Imperial College London

DrHelenavan Velthoven

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0788helena.van-velthoven10 Website

 
 
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Location

 

Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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86 results found

Surodina S, Lam C, Grbich S, Milne-Ives M, van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2021, Authors’ Response to Peer Reviews of “Machine Learning for Risk Group Identification and User Data Collection in a Herpes Simplex Virus Patient Registry: Algorithm Development and Validation Study”, JMIRx Med, Vol: 2, Pages: e28917-e28917

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Journal article

Surodina S, Lam C, Grbich S, Milne-Ives M, van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2021, Machine Learning for Risk Group Identification and User Data Collection in a Herpes Simplex Virus Patient Registry: Algorithm Development and Validation Study, JMIRx Med, Vol: 2, Pages: e25560-e25560

<jats:sec> <jats:title>Background</jats:title> <jats:p>Researching people with herpes simplex virus (HSV) is challenging because of poor data quality, low user engagement, and concerns around stigma and anonymity.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Objective</jats:title> <jats:p>This project aimed to improve data collection for a real-world HSV registry by identifying predictors of HSV infection and selecting a limited number of relevant questions to ask new registry users to determine their level of HSV infection risk.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Methods</jats:title> <jats:p>The US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES, 2015-2016) database includes the confirmed HSV type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2, respectively) status of American participants (14-49 years) and a wealth of demographic and health-related data. The questionnaires and data sets from this survey were used to form two data sets: one for HSV-1 and one for HSV-2. These data sets were used to train and test a model that used a random forest algorithm (devised using Python) to minimize the number of anonymous lifestyle-based questions needed to identify risk groups for HSV.</jats:p> </jats:sec> <jats:sec> <jats:title>Results</jats:title> <jats:p>The model selected a reduced number of questions from the NHANES questionnaire that predicted HSV infection risk with high accuracy scores of 0.91 and 0.96 and high recall scores of 0.88 and 0.98 for the HSV-1 and HSV-2 data sets, respectively. The number of questions was reduced from 150 to an average of 40, depending on age and gender. The model, therefore, provided high predictability of risk of infection with minimal required input.</jats:p>

Journal article

Lam C, van Velthoven M, Meinert E, 2020, Developing a blockchain-based supply chain system for advanced therapies: study protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 1929-0748

Advanced therapies, including cell and gene therapies, have shown therapeutic promise in curing life-threatening diseases such as leukaemia and lymphoma. However, they can be complicated and expensive to deliver due to their sensitivity to environment, troublesome tissue, cell, or genetic material sourcing and complicated regulatory requirements.

Journal article

Wu Q, Huang Y, Liao Z, van Velthoven MH, Wang W, Zhang Yet al., 2020, Effectiveness of WeChat for Improving Exclusive Breastfeeding in Huzhu County China: Randomized Controlled Trial, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1438-8871

Journal article

Milne-Ives M, Lam C, van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, The impact of Brexit on the UK pharmaceutical supply chain: a scoping review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 1929-0748

The continuing uncertainty around Brexit has caused concern in the pharmaceutical industry and among healthcare professionals and patients. The exact consequences of Brexit on the UK pharmaceutical supply chain will depend on whether a deal is reached and what it entails, but it is likely to be affected by the withdrawal of the UK from the EU. Regulatory issues and delays in supply have the potential to seriously negatively affect the ability of UK residents to receive an adequate and timely supply of necessary medicines.

Journal article

Milne-Ives M, Lam C, Van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Mobile fitness and weight management apps: an evaluation protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 1929-0748

Obesity is a large contributing factor for many non-communicable diseases and is a growing problem worldwide. Many mobile apps have been developed to help users improve their fitness and weight management behaviours. However, the speed at which apps are created and updated means that it is important to periodically assess their quality.

Journal article

Meinert E, Rahman E, Potter A, Lawrence W, Stenfors T, van Velthoven Met al., 2020, Usability of the mobile digital health ‘NoObesity’ app for families and healthcare professionals: a feasibility study, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background: Almost a quarter or more than a fifth of children in the United Kingdom (UK) are overweight or obese by the time they start school. The UK Department of Health and Social Care has updated national policy for combating childhood obesity in 2018, with critical outcomes centred on sugar and caloric consumption reduction. Health Education England has developed two digital apps for families with children up to 15 and for their associated health care professionals (HCPs) to provide a digital learning resource and tool aimed at encouraging healthy lifestyles to prevent obesity.Objective: This feasibility study assesses Health Education England’s NoObesity app usability and acceptability to undertake activities to improve families’ diet and physical activity. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the app’s influence on self-efficacy and goal setting and to determine what can be learned to improve its design for future studies, should there be evidence of adoption and sustainability. Methods: The study population will include 20-40 families and their linked health care professionals. Recognising issues related to digital access associated with socioeconomic status (SES) and impact on information technology (IT) use, study recruitment will be regionally focused on a low SES area. The study will last nine-months; three months intervention period and six months follow up. The evaluation of feasibility, acceptability, and usability will be conducted using the following scales and theoretical frameworks: 1. The system usability scale; 2. The Reach Effectiveness Adoption Implementation Maintenance (RE-AIM) framework; 3. Bandura’s model of health promotion; and 4. The Nonadoption, Abandonment, and Challenges to the Scale-up, Spread, and Suitability (NASSS) framework. App use will be captured and quantitatively analysed for net use patterns (e.g. number of screens viewed, number of logins, cumulative minutes using the app, number of plans made

Journal article

de Cock C, van Velthoven M, Milne-Ives M, Mooney M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Use of apps to promote childhood vaccination: a systematic review, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2291-5222

Vaccination is a critical step to reducing child mortality; however, vaccination rates have declined in many countries in recent years. This decrease has been associated with an increase in outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. The potential for leveraging mobile platforms to promote vaccination coverage has been investigated in the development of numerous mobile apps. Whilst many are available for public use, there is little robust evaluation of these applications.

Journal article

Alturkistani A, Lam C, Foley K, Stenfors T, Van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) evaluation methods: A systematic review, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol: 22, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 1438-8871

Background: Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have the potential for broad education impact due to many learners undertaking these courses. Despite their reach, there is a lack of knowledge about which methods are used for evaluating these courses.Objective: This review aims to identify current MOOC evaluation methods in order to inform future study designs.Methods: We systematically searched the following databases: (1) SCOPUS; (2) Education Resources Information Center (ERIC); (3) IEEE Xplore; (4) Medline/PubMed; (5) Web of Science; (6) British Education Index and (7) Google Scholar search engine for studies from January 2008 until October 2018. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and titles of the studies. Published studies in English that evaluated MOOCs were included. The study design of the evaluations, the underlying motivation for the evaluation studies, data collection and data analysis methods were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. The quality of the included studies was appraised using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool for RCTs, the NIH - National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute quality assessment tool for cohort observational studies, and for “Before-After (Pre-Post) Studies With No Control Group”.Results: The initial search resulted in 3275 studies, and 33 eligible studies were included in this review. Studies mostly had a cross-sectional design evaluating one version of a MOOC. We found that studies mostly had a learner-focused, teaching-focused or platform-focused motivation to evaluate the MOOC. The most used data collection methods were surveys, learning management system data and quiz grades and the most used data analysis methods were descriptive and inferential statistics. The methods for evaluating the outcomes of these courses were diverse and unstructured. Most studies with cross-sectional design had a low-quality assessment, whereas randomized controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies receiv

Journal article

Lam C, Milne-Ives M, van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, IoT-enabled technologies for weight management in children and young people: a systematic review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background:Childhood obesity is a serious global issue, leading to greater medical spending in obesity-related diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. There is a need for healthcare services that link health behaviour, such as diet and physical activity, to risk factors and provides better advice and feedback to users, which Internet of Things-enabled technologies could facilitate.Objective:The objective of the systematic review will be to identify available Internet of Things-enabled technologies for weight management of children and young people (users below the age of 18). Also it will aim to understand the use, effectiveness and feasibility of these technologies.Methods:We will search Medline, PubMed, Web of Science, Scopus, ProQuest Central and the IEEE Xplore Digital Library for studies published after 2010 using a combination of keywords and subject headings related to health activity tracking, youth and Internet of Things. In addition, a Google search to identify grey literature will be conducted. Two authors will independently screen the titles and abstracts identified from the search and accept or reject the studies according to the study inclusion criteria. Any discrepancies will then be discussed and resolved. The quality of the included studies will be assessed using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) checklists. Data from included studies will be extracted into a predesigned form to identify the types of devices or apps, Internet of Things applications and health outcomes related to weight management.Results:A preliminary search on Medline returned 484 results. The full systematic review will be conducted within the next 12 months and the publication of the final review and meta-analysis is expected at the beginning of the year 2020.Conclusions:The effectiveness and feasibility of physical activity trackers and consumer wearables for different patient groups have been well reviewed but there are currently no published reviews

Journal article

Lam C, van Velthoven M, Meinert E, 2020, Application of “Internet of Things” in cell-based therapy delivery: a systematic review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 1929-0748

Internet of Things (IoT) or Industry 4.0, represents a ‘smart’ shift to more interconnected manufacturing processes where individual entities within the supply chain communicate with each other in order to achieve greater flexibility and responsiveness in manufacturing and leaner manufacturing to reduce cost of production. IoT has proven itself instrumental in driving leaner manufacturing and more efficient systems in other industries such as transportation and logistics. While cell-based therapeutic products hold the promise of transforming various diseases, the delivery of these products is complex and challenging. This review aims to understand the applicability of IoT in cell-based product supply chain and delivery.

Journal article

Milne-Ives M, Lam C, De Cock C, Van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Mobile apps for health behaviour change in physical activity, diet, drug and alcohol use, and mental health: a systematic review, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 2291-5222

Background: With a growing focus on patient interaction with health management, mobile apps are increasingly used to deliver behavioural health interventions. The large variation in these mobile health apps - their target patient group, health behaviour, and behavioural change strategies - has resulted in a large but incohesive body of literature.Objective: The purpose of this systematic review was to assess the effectiveness of mobile apps at improving health behaviours and outcomes, and to examine the inclusion and effectiveness of Behaviour Change Techniques in mobile health apps.Methods: Medline, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science were systematically searched for articles published between 2014 and 2019 that evaluated mobile apps for health behaviour change. Two authors independently screened and selected studies according to the eligibility criteria. Data was extracted and risk of bias assessed by one reviewer and validated by a second reviewer.Results: 52 randomized controlled trials met the inclusion criteria and were included in analysis - 37 studies focused on physical activity, diet, or a combination of both, 11 on drug and alcohol use, and 4 on mental health. Participant perceptions were generally positive - only one app was rated as less helpful and satisfactory than the control - and the studies that measured engagement and usability found relatively high study completion rates (mean = 83.3%, n = 18) and ease of use ratings (3 significantly better than control, 9/15 rated >70%) . However, there was little evidence of changed behaviour or health outcomes.Conclusions: There was not strong evidence found to support the effectiveness of mobile apps at improving health behaviours or outcomes because few studies found significant differences between the app and control groups. Further research is needed to identify the behaviour change techniques that are most effective at promoting behaviour change. Improved reporting is necessary to accurately evaluate t

Journal article

van Velthoven M, Lam C, de Cock C, Stenfors T, Chaudhury H, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Development of an innovative real world evidence registry for the herpes simplex Virus: a case study, JMIR Dermatology, Vol: 3, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2562-0959

Background: Infection with the Herpes Simplex Virus is common but is not well understood and stigmatised. Whilst a considerable number of people experience mild to severe physical symptoms after infection, only one sub-effective drug is available for treatment. A registry collecting real world data reported by people with the Herpes Simplex Virus could help them manage their condition, facilitate research into a vaccine, better treatment, and the impact of herpes on other conditions.Objective: This paper reports on the development a registry to collect real world data reported by people with the Herpes Simplex Virus.Methods: A case study design was selected to support a systematic means of observing the subject of investigation. The case study followed seven stages: plan, design, prepare, collect, analyse, create and share. We carried out semi-structured interviews with experts, thematically analysed the findings and built use cases. These will be used to generate detailed models of how a real world evidence registry might look, feel, and operate for different users.Results: We found the following key themes in the interviews: 1) stigma and anonymity; 2) selection bias; 3) understanding treatment and outcome gaps; 4) lifestyle factors; 5) individualised vs population-level; and 6) severe complications of herpes simplex virus. We developed use cases for different types of patients, members of the public, researchers and clinicians for a herpes simplex virus registry.Conclusions: This case study showed insights for the development of an appropriate registry to collect real world data reported by people with the Herpes Simplex Virus. Further research is needed on developing and testing the registry with different users and evaluate its feasibility and effectiveness of collecting data to support symptom management, and the development of vaccines and better treatment.

Journal article

Fawcett E, van Velthoven M, Brindley D, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Long-term weight management using wearable technology in overweight and obese adults: A systematic review, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2291-5222

Background:Whilst there are many wearable devices available to help people losing weight and decrease the rising obesity prevalence, their effectiveness in long-term weight management has not been established.Objective:To systematically review the literature on using wearable technology for long-term weight loss in overweight and obese adults.Methods:We searched the following databases: Medline, Embase, Compendex - ScienceDirect, Cochrane Central, and Scopus. Studies were included that took measurements over a period of ≥1 year (long-term) and had adult participants with a BMI > 24. Two reviewers screened titles and abstracts and assessed selected full text papers for eligibility. Risk of bias assessment was done through the following tools appropriate for different study types: The Cochrane Risk of Bias Tool, ROBINS-I, AMSTAR, ‘6 Questions to Trigger Critical Thinking’. The results of the studies are provided in a narrative summary. Results: We included five intervention studies: four randomised controlled trials, and one non-randomized study. Also, we used insights from six systematic reviews, four commentary papers and a dissertation. The interventions delivered by wearable devices did not show a benefit over comparator interventions, but overweight and obese participants still lost weight over time. The included intervention studies were likely to suffer from bias. There was a range of conclusions between the included studies, due to differences in their objectives, methods, and results. Therefore, it was not possible to conduct a meta-analysis. Conclusions:This review showed some evidence that wearable devices can improve long-term physical activity and weight loss outcomes, but there was not enough evidence to show a benefit over comparator methods. A major issue is the challenge to separate the effect of decreasing use of wearable devices over time from the effect of the wearable devices on outcomes. Consistency in study methods is needed i

Journal article

de Cock C, Milne-Ives M, van Velthoven M, Alturkistani A, Lam C, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Effectiveness of conversational agents (virtual assistants) in healthcare: protocol for a systematic review, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background:Conversational agents have evolved in recent decades to become multimodal, multifunctional platforms that have the potential to automate a diverse range of health-related activities, supporting the general public, patients and physicians. Multiple studies have reported the development of these agents and recent systematic reviews have described the scope of use of conversational agents in healthcare. However, there is little focus on the effectiveness of these systems, thus the viability and applicability of these systems is unclear.Objective:The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of conversational agents in healthcare and to identify limitations, adverse events and areas for future investigation of these agents.Methods:The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols will be used to structure this protocol. The focus of the systematic review is guided by a population, intervention, comparator, and outcome framework . A systematic search of PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science will be conducted. Two authors will independently screen the titles and abstracts of identified references and select studies according to the eligibility criteria. Any discrepancies will then be discussed and resolved. Two reviewers will extract and validate data, respectively, from included studies into a standardised form and conduct quality appraisal.Results:At the time of writing, we have begun a preliminary literature search and piloting of the study selection process.Conclusions:This systematic review aims to clarify the effectiveness, limitations and future applications of conversational agents in healthcare. Our findings may be used to inform future development of conversational agents and further the personalisation of care.

Journal article

Van Velthoven M, Milne-Ives M, de Cock C, Mooney M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Use of apps to promote childhood vaccination: a systematic review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-6, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background:The decline in the uptake of routine childhood vaccinations has resulted in outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases. Vaccination apps can be used as a tool to promote immunization through the provision of reminders, dissemination of information, peer-support and feedback.Objective:The aim of this review is to systematically review the evidence on the use of apps to support childhood vaccination uptake, information storage and record sharing. Methods:We will identify relevant papers by searching electronic databases: PubMed, EMBASE (Ovid), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ERIC and ClinicalTrials.gov. We will review the reference lists of those studies that we include to identify relevant additional papers not initially identified using our search strategy. In addition to the use of electronic databases, we will search for grey literature on the topic. The search strategy will include only terms relating to or describing the intervention, which is app use. As almost all titles and abstracts are in English, 100% of these will be reviewed, but retrieval will be confined to those in the English language. We will record the search outcome on a specifically designed record sheet. Two reviewers will select observational and intervention studies, appraise the quality of the studies and extract the relevant data.

Journal article

Boylan A-M, Turk A, van Velthoven MH, Powell Jet al., 2020, Online patient feedback as a measure of quality in primary care: a multimethod study using correlation and qualitative analysis, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Lam C, van Velthoven M, Chaudhury H, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Teaching real world evidence: a systematic review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-5, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background: Real world evidence refers to observational healthcare data beyond clinical trial data. It holds promise of transforming healthcare as a new form of evidence to support decision-makers in making decisions in developing and regulating medicines. As the importance of real world evidence is recognized by industry and regulatory bodies, teaching real world evidence becomes an important matter to evaluate and refine in order to develop future researchers and stakeholders who can better integrate RWE into the routine development of medicine.Objective: The aim of this review is to understand how real world evidence is currently being taught. From this landscape study, the insufficiencies of current education of real world evidence can be identified and subsequently inform future education policies around RWE and its sub-facets.Methods: We will search Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, HMIC, Cochrane and Web of Science for published studies using a combination of keywords and subject headings related to real world evidence and education. In addition, a Google search to identify grey literature will be conducted. Two authors will independently screen the titles and abstracts identified from the search and accept or reject the studies according to the study inclusion criteria, and any discrepancies will then be discussed and resolved. The quality of the included literature will be assessed using the CASP Systematic Review checklist. Results: Data from eligible publications will be abstracted into a predesigned form in order to better understand the current state of education of RWE and inform future real world evidence education directions and policies.Conclusions: The subsequent systematic review will be published in a peer-reviewed journal.

Journal article

Milne-Ives M, Lam C, van Velthoven M, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Mobile apps for health behaviour change: a systematic review protocol, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 1929-0748

The popularity and ubiquity of mobile apps has rapidly expanded in the past decade. With a growing focus on patient interaction with health management, mobile apps are increasingly used to monitor health and deliver behavioural interventions. The large variation in these mobile health apps - their target patient group, health behaviour, and behavioural change strategy - has resulted in a large but incohesive body of literature.

Journal article

Alturkistani A, Lam C, Foley K, Stenfors T, Blum ER, Van Velthoven MH, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Massive open online course evaluation methods: systematic review (Preprint), Publisher: JMIR Publications

Background:Massive open online courses (MOOCs) have the potential to make a broader educational impact because many learners undertake these courses. Despite their reach, there is a lack of knowledge about which methods are used for evaluating these courses.Objective:The aim of this review was to identify current MOOC evaluation methods to inform future study designs.Methods:We systematically searched the following databases for studies published from January 2008 to October 2018: (1) Scopus, (2) Education Resources Information Center, (3) IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers) Xplore, (4) PubMed, (5) Web of Science, (6) British Education Index, and (7) Google Scholar search engine. Two reviewers independently screened the abstracts and titles of the studies. Published studies in the English language that evaluated MOOCs were included. The study design of the evaluations, the underlying motivation for the evaluation studies, data collection, and data analysis methods were quantitatively and qualitatively analyzed. The quality of the included studies was appraised using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the National Institutes of Health—National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute quality assessment tool for cohort observational studies and for before-after (pre-post) studies with no control group.Results:The initial search resulted in 3275 studies, and 33 eligible studies were included in this review. In total, 16 studies used a quantitative study design, 11 used a qualitative design, and 6 used a mixed methods study design. In all, 16 studies evaluated learner characteristics and behavior, and 20 studies evaluated learning outcomes and experiences. A total of 12 studies used 1 data source, 11 used 2 data sources, 7 used 3 data sources, 4 used 2 data sources, and 1 used 5 data sources. Overall, 3 studies used more than 3 data sources in their evaluation. In terms of the data analysis methods

Working paper

Hu R, Velthoven M, Brindley D, Meinert Eet al., 2020, Perspectives of overweight and obese people on using wearable technology for weight management: a systematic review, JMIR mHealth and uHealth, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2291-5222

Background: Obesity is a large contributor to preventable chronic diseases and healthcare costs. The efficacy of wearable devices for weight management has been researched, however, there is limited knowledge on how these devices are perceived by users. Objective: To review user perspectives on wearable technology for weight management in overweight and obese people. Methods: We searched the online databases Pubmed, Scopus, Embase and the Cochrane library for literature published from 2008 onwards. We included all types of studies using a wearable device for delivering weight-loss interventions in overweight or obese adults when qualitative data were collected about participant’s perspectives on the device. We performed a quality assessment using criteria relevant to different study types. The Cochrane risk of bias tool was used for randomized controlled trials. The Risk of Bias in Non-randomised Studies – of Interventions (ROBINS-I) was used for non-randomised studies. The Oxman and Guyatt Criteria was used for systematic reviews. We used the Critical appraisal checklist for qualitative studies. Data were extracted into a data extraction sheet and thematically analyzed. Results: We included 19 studies: 5 randomized controlled trials, 6 non-randomised studies, 5 qualitative studies, and 3 reviews. Mixed perceptions existed for different constructs of wearable technologies, which reflects on differences in the suitability of wearable technology interventions for different individuals in different contexts. This also indicates that interventions were not often tailored to participant’s motivations. In addition, very few wearable technology interventions included a thorough qualitative analysis of the participant’s view on important features of the intervention that made it successful. Conclusions: This study highlighted the importance of determining the type of intervention most suitable for an individual before the intervention is used. This c

Journal article

de Cock C, Milne-Ives M, van Velthoven MH, Alturkistani A, Lam C, Meinert Eet al., 2019, Effectiveness of conversational agents (virtual assistants) in health care: protocol for a systematic review (Preprint), Publisher: JMIR Publications Inc.

Background:Conversational agents have evolved in recent decades to become multimodal, multifunctional platforms that have the potential to automate a diverse range of health-related activities, supporting the general public, patients and physicians. Multiple studies have reported the development of these agents and recent systematic reviews have described the scope of use of conversational agents in healthcare. However, there is little focus on the effectiveness of these systems, thus the viability and applicability of these systems is unclear.Objective:The objective of this systematic review is to assess the effectiveness of conversational agents in healthcare and to identify limitations, adverse events and areas for future investigation of these agents.Methods:The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Protocols will be used to structure this protocol. The focus of the systematic review is guided by a population, intervention, comparator, and outcome framework . A systematic search of PubMed (Medline), EMBASE, CINAHL, and Web of Science will be conducted. Two authors will independently screen the titles and abstracts of identified references and select studies according to the eligibility criteria. Any discrepancies will then be discussed and resolved. Two reviewers will extract and validate data, respectively, from included studies into a standardised form and conduct quality appraisal.Results:At the time of writing, we have begun a preliminary literature search and piloting of the study selection process.Conclusions:This systematic review aims to clarify the effectiveness, limitations and future applications of conversational agents in healthcare. Our findings may be used to inform future development of conversational agents and further the personalisation of care.

Working paper

Van Velthoven MH, Adjei F, Vavoulis D, Wells G, Brindley D, Kardos Aet al., 2019, ChroniSense National Early Warning Score Study (CHESS): a wearable wrist device to measure vital signs in hospitalised patients-protocol and study design, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Van Velthoven MH, Cordon C, 2019, Sustainable Adoption of Digital Health Innovations: Perspectives From a Stakeholder Workshop, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1438-8871

Journal article

Meinert E, Alturkistani A, Foley KA, Osama T, Car J, Majeed A, Van Velthoven M, Wells G, Brindley Det al., 2019, Blockchain implementation in health care: Protocol for a systematic review, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 8, Pages: 153-159, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background: A blockchain is a digitized, decentralized, distributed public ledger that acts as a shared and synchronized database that records cryptocurrency transactions. Despite the shift toward digital platforms enabled by electronic medical records, demonstrating a will to reform the health care sector, health systems face issues including security, interoperability, data fragmentation, timely access to patient data, and silos. The application of health care blockchains could enable data interoperability, enhancement of precision medicine, and reduction in prescription frauds through implementing novel methods in access and patient consent.Objective: To summarize the evidence on the strategies and frameworks utilized to implement blockchains for patient data in health care to ensure privacy and improve interoperability and scalability. It is anticipated this review will assist in the development of recommendations that will assist key stakeholders in health care blockchain implementation, and we predict that the evidence generated will challenge the health care status quo, moving away from more traditional approaches and facilitating decision making of patients, health care providers, and researchers.Methods: A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, Scopus, ProQuest Technology Collection and Engineering Index will be conducted. Two experienced independent reviewers will conduct titles and abstract screening followed by full-text reading to determine study eligibility. Data will then be extracted onto data extraction forms before using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Tool to appraise the quality of included randomized studies and the Risk of Bias in nonrandomized studies of Interventions to assess the quality of nonrandomized studies. Data will then be analyzed and synthesized.Results: Database searches will be initiated in September 2018. We expect to complete the review in January 2019.Conclusions: This review will summarize the strategies and fra

Journal article

Meinert E, Van Velthoven M, Brindley D, Alturkistani A, Foley K, Rees S, Wells G, de Pennington Net al., 2018, The internet of things in health care in Oxford: protocol for proof-of-concept projects, JMIR Research Protocols, Vol: 7, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1929-0748

Background:Demands on health services across are increasing because of the combined challenges of an expanding and aging population, alongside complex comorbidities that transcend the classical boundaries of modern health care. Continuing to provide and coordinate care in the current manner is not a viable route to sustain the improvements in health outcomes observed in recent history. To ensure that there continues to be improvement in patient care, prevention of disease, and reduced burden on health systems, it is essential that we adapt our models of delivery. Providers of health and social care are evolving to face these pressures by changing the way they think about the care system and, importantly, how to involve patients in the planning and delivery of services.Objective:The objective of this paper is to provide (1) an overview of the current state of Internet of Things (IoT) and key implementation considerations, (2) key use cases demonstrating technology capabilities, (3) an overview of the landscape for health care IoT use in Oxford, and (4) recommendations for promoting the IoT via collaborations between higher education institutions and industry proof-of-concept (PoC) projects.Methods:This study describes the PoC projects that will be created to explore cost-effectiveness, clinical efficacy, and user adoption of Internet of Medical Things systems. The projects will focus on 3 areas: (1) bring your own device integration, (2) chronic disease management, and (3) personal health records.Results:This study is funded by Research England’s Connecting Capability Fund. The study started in March 2018, and results are expected by the end of 2019.Conclusions:Embracing digital solutions to support the evolution and transformation of health services is essential. Importantly, this should not simply be undertaken by providers in isolation. It must embrace and exploit the advances being seen in the consumer devices, national rollout of high-speed broadband servi

Journal article

Meinert E, Van Velthoven M, Brindley D, Alturkistani A, Foley K, Rees S, Wells G, de Pennington Net al., 2018, The internet of things in health care in Oxford: protocol for proof-of-concept projects (Preprint), Publisher: JMIR Publications

Background:Demands on health services across are increasing because of the combined challenges of an expanding and aging population, alongside complex comorbidities that transcend the classical boundaries of modern health care. Continuing to provide and coordinate care in the current manner is not a viable route to sustain the improvements in health outcomes observed in recent history. To ensure that there continues to be improvement in patient care, prevention of disease, and reduced burden on health systems, it is essential that we adapt our models of delivery. Providers of health and social care are evolving to face these pressures by changing the way they think about the care system and, importantly, how to involve patients in the planning and delivery of services.Objective:The objective of this paper is to provide (1) an overview of the current state of Internet of Things (IoT) and key implementation considerations, (2) key use cases demonstrating technology capabilities, (3) an overview of the landscape for health care IoT use in Oxford, and (4) recommendations for promoting the IoT via collaborations between higher education institutions and industry proof-of-concept (PoC) projects.Methods:This study describes the PoC projects that will be created to explore cost-effectiveness, clinical efficacy, and user adoption of Internet of Medical Things systems. The projects will focus on 3 areas: (1) bring your own device integration, (2) chronic disease management, and (3) personal health records.Results:This study is funded by Research England’s Connecting Capability Fund. The study started in March 2018, and results are expected by the end of 2019.Conclusions:Embracing digital solutions to support the evolution and transformation of health services is essential. Importantly, this should not simply be undertaken by providers in isolation. It must embrace and exploit the advances being seen in the consumer devices, national rollout of high-speed broadband servi

Working paper

van Velthoven MH, Wyatt JC, Meinert E, Brindley D, Wells Get al., 2018, How standards and user involvement can improve app quality: A lifecycle approach, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INFORMATICS, Vol: 118, Pages: 54-57, ISSN: 1386-5056

Journal article

Van Velthoven MH, Smith J, Wells G, Brindley Det al., 2018, Digital health app development standards: a systematic review protocol., BMJ Open, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2044-6055

INTRODUCTION: There is currently a lack of clear and accepted standards for the development (planning, requirement analysis and research, design and application testing) of apps for medical and healthcare use which poses different risks to developers, providers, patients and the public. The aim of this work is to provide an overview of the current standards, frameworks, best practices and guidelines for the development of digital health apps. This review is a critical 'stepping stone' for further work on producing appropriate standards that can help mitigate risks (eg, clinical, privacy and economic risks). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: A systematic review identifying criteria from applicable standards, guidelines, frameworks and best practices for the development of health apps. We will draw from standards for software for medical devices, clinical information systems and medicine because of their relatedness and hope to apply lessons learnt to apps. We will exclude other types of publications, and those published in languages other than English. We will search websites of relevant regulatory and professional organisations. For health apps, we will also search electronic research databases (eg, MEDLINE, Embase, SCOPUS, ProQuest Technology Collection and Engineering Index) because relevant publications may not be found on other websites. We will hand-search reference lists of included publications. The review will focus on international, USA, European and UK standards because these are the markets of primary interest to the majority of app developers currently. We will provide a narrative overview of findings and tabular summaries of extracted data. Also, we will examine the relationship between different standards and compare USA and European Union standards. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: No ethics approval is required. The review will be disseminated through peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations and inform efforts that aim to improve the quality of health apps

Journal article

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