Imperial College London

Dr Yiannis Kountouris

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9316i.kountouris

 
 
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Location

 

106Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

21 results found

Ford A, Harrison S, Kountouris I, Millington J, Mistry J, Perkins O, Rabin S, Rein G, Schreckenberg K, Smith C, Smith T, Yadav Ket al., 2021, Modelling human-fire interactions: combining alternative perspectives and approaches, Frontiers in Environmental Science, ISSN: 2296-665X

Journal article

Kountouris Y, 2021, An assessment of the relationship between daylight saving time, disruptions in sleep patterns and dwelling fires, Fire Technology, Vol: 57, Pages: 123-144, ISSN: 0015-2684

Residential fires pose threats to living environments, generating costs to health and property. Understanding the roles of human behavior and social organization in determining fire occurrence is important for developing strategies to manage fire risk. This paper tests the impact of daylight saving time (DST) transitions on dwelling fire occurrence. DST transitions affect sleep patterns, impairing human cognitive and motor performance, potentially influencing the incidence of dwelling fires. Employing a regression discontinuity design with time as the running variable and using data from over 260,000 primary dwelling fires that took place in the U.K. over 8 years we do not find evidence suggesting that DST transitions impact on dwelling fire occurrence. For both the start of DST and end of DST transitions, estimated effects is quantitatively small and statistically insignificant. Results suggest that disruptions in sleep patterns induced by DST are not a driver of dwelling fires in the U.K.

Journal article

Harris ZM, Kountouris Y, 2020, Vertical Farming as a Game Changer for BECCS Technology Deployment, SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 12

Journal article

Kountouris Y, 2020, Higher education and fertility: evidence from reforms in Greece., Economics of Education Review, ISSN: 0272-7757

Journal article

Kountouris Y, 2020, Examining the Relationship between Elections and Wildfires, International Journal of Wildland Fire, ISSN: 1049-8001

Journal article

Kountouris Y, 2020, Human activity, daylight saving time and wildfire occurrence, Science of The Total Environment, Vol: 727, ISSN: 0048-9697

Wildfires shape landscapes and ecosystems, affecting health and infrastructure. Understanding the complex interactions between social organization, human activity and the natural environment that drive wildfire occurrence is becoming increasingly important as changing global environmental conditions combined with the expanding human-wildland interface, are expected to increase wildfire frequency and severity. This paper examines the anthropogenic drivers of wildfire, and the relationship between the organization of human activity in time and wildfire occurrence focusing on the effects of transitions into and out of Daylight Saving Time (DST). DST transitions shift activity in relation to natural wildfire risk within a solar day, induce changes in the time allocated to wildfire-causing activities and disrupt sleep patterns. The paper estimates short and medium run effects of DST-induced changes in the temporal organization of human activity through a Regression Discontinuity Design with time as the running variable and Fixed Effects models, using data from over 1.88 million non-prescribed ignitions recorded in the contiguous US over 23 years. Estimates suggest that DST has a quantitatively and statistically significant immediate and medium-run effect on wildfire occurrence. Wildfire occurrence jumps by around 30% in the immediate aftermath of transitions into DST, adding about 98 human-caused wildfires across the contiguous US per year, while the transition's effect is detectable for 3 weeks. Transitions induce within-day temporal displacement of wildfires in a pattern compatible with the shifting of human activity mechanism, while the result cannot be attributed exclusively on disruptions in sleep patterns. Naturally arising lightning-strike wildfires do not respond to changes in civil time, while the results are robust to changes in assumptions. Results suggest that wildfire policy should account for the temporal organization of human activity.

Journal article

Kountouris Y, 2020, Ambient PM2.5 influences productive activities in public sector bureaucracies., Environmental Research Communications, Vol: 2, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2515-7620

Fine particles (PM2.5) can penetrate buildings through ventilation and air conditioning systems, exposing indoors workers to pollution levels similar to those prevailing outdoors. This letter investigates the immediate influence of fine particle pollution on the productive activity of local government bureaucracies, linking novel data on the daily output of local governments in municipalities of the Athens metropolitan area, Greece, to PM2.5 levels recorded nearby. To address biases introduced by omitted variables and measurement error, I use the plausibly exogenous variation introduced by the basin's horizontal ventilation, instrumenting PM2.5 levels with local wind strength. Estimates suggest a statistically and quantitatively significant negative effect from PM2.5 on the output of public administrations. Increasing PM2.5 levels by 1% decreases the activity proxy by around 0.25%. Results point to the influence PM2.5 can have on activities that are mentally but not physically demanding and suggest that costs from PM2.5 will increase with the share of global income produced by office workers.

Journal article

Collins C, Vaskou P, Kountouris I, 2019, Insect food products in the Western world: assessing the potential of a new ‘green’ market, Annals of the Entomological Society of America, Vol: 112, Pages: 518-528, ISSN: 0013-8746

Although two billion people already eat insects in the world and the benefits of edible insects are well known, these ‘green’ sources of protein are neither treated as conventional food products nor widely incorporatedinto Western diets. Using a school-based investigation surveying 161 children, aged 6–15, and 114 of theirparents in London, and an online consumer survey with mainly British and French consumers (N = 1,020), this research provides insights into the potential of the insect market in the West. This work supports the idea that incorporating insect food into our diets makes not only environmental but also business sense.A nonnegligible segment of the population surveyed is willing to pay for mealworm minced meat and young children and pre-teens could represent a substantial market segment, as yet unexplored. This analysis points to multiple marketing strategies, such as early exposure, education, reducing the visibility of insect parts, celebrity endorsement, or peer-to-peer marketing, all of which could facilitate the adoption of insect food in the ‘mainstream’ arena, according to the consumer segment being targeted. Generalizations from these results are restricted to an educated and youthful subset of the potential consumer pool and further work remains to understand the patterns of Western consumer acceptance for the range of insect foods.

Journal article

Kountouris I, Remoundou K, 2016, Cultural Influence on Preferences and Attitudes for Environmental Quality, Kyklos, Vol: 69, Pages: 369-397, ISSN: 1467-6435

We investigate national culture's influence on preferences for and attitudes to environmental quality. We use the cultural diversity of immigrants in European countries to isolate the effect of culture from the confounding effect of the economic and institutional environment. Results suggest that culture is a significant determinant of migrants' individual environmental preferences and attitudes. Migrants from countries with higher levels of environmental preferences are more willing to trade off income for environmental quality when controlling for individual characteristics, country of residence, and country of origin macroeconomic and environmental conditions. Furthermore, culture significantly influences individual beliefs about limits to growth, the fragility of the balance of nature, and the likelihood of an ecological crisis. The result is robust to alternative definitions of the cultural proxy and points to the significance of accounting for cultural influences in the design of domestic and international environmental policy and the application of environmental valuation techniques.

Journal article

Kountouris Y, Nakic Z, Sauer J, 2015, Political instability and non-market valuation: Evidence from Croatia, Resource and Energy Economics, Vol: 41, Pages: 19-39, ISSN: 1873-0221

We examine the effect of political instability on willingness to pay estimates (WTP) from nonmarket valuation, using data from a choice experiment implemented in Zagreb, Croatia to value groundwater quality and quantity. To evaluate the sensitivity of preferences for environmental quality to instability, we use the timing of a period of public protest that occurred in the city during the data collection and compare preferences before and during the protest. We find some evidence that WTP is lower in the period of political instability, but the result is sensitive to the specification used.

Journal article

Kountouris Y, Remoundou K, 2014, About time: Daylight Saving Time transition and individual well-being, ECONOMICS LETTERS, Vol: 122, Pages: 100-103, ISSN: 0165-1765

Journal article

Kountouris Y, Remoundou K, 2013, Is there a cultural component in tax morale? Evidence from immigrants in Europe, JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC BEHAVIOR & ORGANIZATION, Vol: 96, Pages: 104-119, ISSN: 0167-2681

Journal article

Remoundou K, Kountouris Y, Koundouri P, 2012, Is the value of an environmental public good sensitive to the providing institution?, Resource and Energy Economics

Journal article

Kountouris Y, Remoundou K, 2011, Valuing the Welfare Cost of Forest Fires: a Life Satisfaction Approach, Kyklos

Journal article

Kountouris Y, Remoundou K, 2011, Valuing the Welfare Cost of Forest Fires: a Life Satisfaction Approach, Kyklos, Vol: 64, Pages: 556-578

Journal article

Selassie GG, Kountouris Y, 2010, Fishing permit price and wetland conservation: A choice experiment on the value of improved environmental quality of lake awassa, Ethiopia, Choice Experiments in Developing Countries: Implementation, Challenges and Policy Implications, Pages: 50-66, ISBN: 9781848440036

Book chapter

Birol E, Koundouri P, Kountouris Y, 2010, Assessing the economic viability of alternative water resources in water-scarce regions: Combining economic valuation, cost-benefit analysis and discounting, Ecological Economics, Pages: 839-847

Journal article

Koundouri P, Kountouris Y, Remoundou K, 2009, Valuing a wind farm construction: A contingent valuation study in Greece, Energy Policy, Pages: 1939-1944

Journal article

Birol E, Hanley N, Koundouri P, Kountouris Yet al., 2009, Optimal management of wetlands: Quantifying trade-offs between flood risks, recreation, and biodiversity conservation, Water Resources Research

Journal article

Birol E, Koundouri P, Kountouris Y, 2008, Integrating wetland management into sustainable water resources allocation: The case of akrotiri wetland in Cyprus, Journal of Environmental Planning and Management

Journal article

Birol E, Koundouri P, Kountouris Y, 2008, Evaluating farmers' preferences for wastewater: Quantity and quality aspects, International Journal of Water

Journal article

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