Imperial College London

DrIanMaconochie

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Infectious Disease

Professor of Practice (Paediatric Emergency Medicine)
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 3729i.maconochie

 
 
//

Location

 

Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

286 results found

Ben T, Goodacre S, Lee E, Sutton L, Bursnall M, Loban A, Waterhouse S, Simmonds R, Biggs K, Marincowitz C, Schutter J, Connelly S, Sheldon E, Hall J, Young E, Bentley A, Challen K, Fitzsimmons C, Harris T, Lecky F, Lee A, Maconochie I, Walter Det al., 2021, Prognostic accuracy of emergency department triage tools for adults with suspected COVID-19: the PRIEST observational cohort study, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 38, Pages: 587-+, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Nijman R, Oostenbrink R, Moll HA, Casals-Pascual C, von Both U, Cunnington A, De T, Eleftheriou I, Emonts M, Fink C, Van Der Flier M, de Groot R, Kaforou M, Kohlmaier B, Kuijpers TW, Lim E, Maconochie I, Paulus S, Martinon-Torres F, Pokorn M, Romaine S, Rivero Calle I, Schlapbach L, Smit FJ, Tsolia M, Usuf E, Wright V, Yeung S, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Levin M, Herberg J, Carrol EDet al., 2021, A novel framework for phenotyping children with suspected or confirmed infection for future biomarker studies, Frontiers in Pediatrics, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 2296-2360

Background: The limited diagnostic accuracy of biomarkers in children at risk of a serious bacterial infection (SBI) might be due to the imperfect reference standard of SBI. We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of a new classification algorithm for biomarker discovery in children at risk of SBI.Methods: We used data from five previously published, prospective observational biomarker discovery studies, which included patients aged 0– <16 years: the Alder Hey emergency department (n = 1,120), Alder Hey pediatric intensive care unit (n = 355), Erasmus emergency department (n = 1,993), Maasstad emergency department (n = 714) and St. Mary's hospital (n = 200) cohorts. Biomarkers including procalcitonin (PCT) (4 cohorts), neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin-2 (NGAL) (3 cohorts) and resistin (2 cohorts) were compared for their ability to classify patients according to current standards (dichotomous classification of SBI vs. non-SBI), vs. a proposed PERFORM classification algorithm that assign patients to one of eleven categories. These categories were based on clinical phenotype, test outcomes and C-reactive protein level and accounted for the uncertainty of final diagnosis in many febrile children. The success of the biomarkers was measured by the Area under the receiver operating Curves (AUCs) when they were used individually or in combination.Results: Using the new PERFORM classification system, patients with clinically confident bacterial diagnosis (“definite bacterial” category) had significantly higher levels of PCT, NGAL and resistin compared with those with a clinically confident viral diagnosis (“definite viral” category). Patients with diagnostic uncertainty had biomarker concentrations that varied across the spectrum. AUCs were higher for classification of “definite bacterial” vs. “definite viral” following the PERFORM algorithm than using the “SBI” vs. “non-SBI” c

Journal article

Nijman R, Borensztajn D, Zachariasse J, Hajema C, Freitas P, Greber-Platzer S, Smit F, Alves C, van der Lei J, Steyerberg E, Maconochie I, Moll Het al., 2021, A clinical prediction model to identify children at risk for revisits with serious illness to the emergency department: a prospective multicentre observational study, PLoS One, Vol: 16, Pages: 1-19, ISSN: 1932-6203

BackgroundTo develop a clinical prediction model to identify children at risk for revisits with serious illness to the emergency department.Methods and findingsA secondary analysis of a prospective multicentre observational study in five European EDs (the TRIAGE study), including consecutive children aged <16 years who were discharged following their initial ED visit (‘index’ visit), in 2012–2015. Standardised data on patient characteristics, Manchester Triage System urgency classification, vital signs, clinical interventions and procedures were collected. The outcome measure was serious illness defined as hospital admission or PICU admission or death in ED after an unplanned revisit within 7 days of the index visit. Prediction models were developed using multivariable logistic regression using characteristics of the index visit to predict the likelihood of a revisit with a serious illness. The clinical model included day and time of presentation, season, age, gender, presenting problem, triage urgency, and vital signs. An extended model added laboratory investigations, imaging, and intravenous medications. Cross validation between the five sites was performed, and discrimination and calibration were assessed using random effects models. A digital calculator was constructed for clinical implementation. 7,891 children out of 98,561 children had a revisit to the ED (8.0%), of whom 1,026 children (1.0%) returned to the ED with a serious illness. Rates of revisits with serious illness varied between the hospitals (range 0.7–2.2%). The clinical model had a summary Area under the operating curve (AUC) of 0.70 (95% CI 0.65–0.74) and summary calibration slope of 0.83 (95% CI 0.67–0.99). 4,433 children (5%) had a risk of > = 3%, which was useful for ruling in a revisit with serious illness, with positive likelihood ratio 4.41 (95% CI 3.87–5.01) and specificity 0.96 (95% CI 0.95–0.96). 37,546 (39%) had a risk <0.5%, whi

Journal article

Borenzstajn D, Hagedoorn N, Carrol ED, von Both U, Dewez JE, Emonts M, Van Der Flier M, de Groot R, Herberg J, Kohlmaier B, Lim E, Maconochie IK, Martinon-Torres F, Nieboer D, Nijman R, Oostenbrink R, Pokorn M, Rivero Calle I, Strle F, Tsolia M, Vermont CL, Yeung S, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Levin M, Moll HAet al., 2021, A NICE combination for predicting hospitalisation at the Emergency Department: a European multicentre observational study of febrile children., The Lancet Regional Health - Europe, ISSN: 2666-7762

BackgroundProlonged Emergency Department (ED) stay causes crowding and negatively impacts quality of care. We developed and validated a prediction model for early identification of febrile children with a high risk of hospitalisation in order to improve ED flow.MethodsThe MOFICHE study prospectively collected data on febrile children (0–18 years) presenting to 12 European EDs. A prediction models was constructed using multivariable logistic regression and included patient characteristics available at triage. We determined the discriminative values of the model by calculating the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC).FindingsOf 38,424 paediatric encounters, 9,735 children were admitted to the ward and 157 to the PICU. The prediction model, combining patient characteristics and NICE alarming, yielded an AUC of 0.84 (95%CI 0.83-0.84).The model performed well for a rule-in threshold of 75% (specificity 99.0% (95%CI 98.9-99.1%, positive likelihood ratio 15.1 (95%CI 13.4-17.1), positive predictive value 0.84 (95%CI 0.82-0.86)) and a rule-out threshold of 7.5% (sensitivity 95.4% (95%CI 95.0-95.8), negative likelihood ratio 0.15 (95%CI 0.14-0.16), negative predictive value 0..95 (95%CI 0.95-9.96)). Validation in a separate dataset showed an excellent AUC of 0.91 (95%CI 0.90- 0.93). The model performed well for identifying children needing PICU admission (AUC 0.95, 95%CI 0.93-0.97). A digital calculator was developed to facilitate clinical use.InterpretationPatient characteristics and NICE alarming signs available at triage can be used to identify febrile children at high risk for hospitalisation and can be used to improve ED flow.FundingEuropean Union, NIHR, NHS.

Journal article

Deluca P, Coulton S, Alam MF, Boniface S, Cohen D, Donoghue K, Gilvarry E, Kaner E, Maconochie I, McArdle P, McGovern R, Newbury-Birch D, Patton R, Pellatt-Higgins T, Phillips C, Phillips T, Pockett RD, Russell I, Strang J, Drummond Cet al., 2021, Brief interventions to prevent excessive alcohol use in adolescents at low-risk presenting to Emergency Departments: Three-arm, randomised trial of effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DRUG POLICY, Vol: 93, ISSN: 0955-3959

Journal article

Hagedoorn NN, Zachariasse JM, Borensztajn D, Adriaansens E, von Both U, Carrol ED, Eleftheriou I, Emonts M, van der Flier M, de Groot R, Herberg JA, Kohlmaier B, Lim E, Maconochie I, Martinón-Torres F, Nijman RG, Pokorn M, Rivero-Calle I, Tsolia M, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Levin M, Vermont C, Moll HA, PERFORM consortiumet al., 2021, Shock Index in the early assessment of febrile children at the emergency department: a prospective multicentre study, Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN: 0003-9888

OBJECTIVE: (1) To derive reference values for the Shock Index (heart rate/systolic blood pressure) based on a large emergency department (ED) population of febrile children and (2) to determine the diagnostic value of the Shock Index for serious illness in febrile children. DESIGN/SETTING: Observational study in 11 European EDs (2017-2018). PATIENTS: Febrile children with measured blood pressure. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Serious bacterial infection (SBI), invasive bacterial infection (IBI), immediate life-saving interventions (ILSIs) and intensive care unit (ICU) admission. The association between high Shock Index (>95th centile) and each outcome was determined by logistic regression adjusted for age, sex, referral, comorbidity and temperature. Additionally, we calculated sensitivity, specificity and negative/positive likelihood ratios (LRs). RESULTS: Of 5622 children, 461 (8.2%) had SBI, 46 (0.8%) had IBI, 203 (3.6%) were treated with ILSI and 69 (1.2%) were ICU admitted. High Shock Index was associated with SBI (adjusted OR (aOR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.3 to 1.9)), ILSI (aOR 2.5 (95% CI 2.0 to 2.9)), ICU admission (aOR 2.2 (95% CI 1.4 to 2.9)) but not with IBI (aOR: 1.5 (95% CI 0.6 to 2.4)). For the different outcomes, sensitivity for high Shock Index ranged from 0.10 to 0.15, specificity ranged from 0.95 to 0.95, negative LRs ranged from 0.90 to 0.95 and positive LRs ranged from 1.8 to 2.8. CONCLUSIONS: High Shock Index is associated with serious illness in febrile children. However, its rule-out value is insufficient which suggests that the Shock Index is not valuable as a screening tool for all febrile children at the ED.

Journal article

Hagedoorn N, Borensztajn D, Nijman R, Nieboer D, Herberg J, Balode A, von Both U, Carroll E, Eleftheriou I, Emonts M, Van Der Flier M, de Groot R, Kohlmaier B, Lim E, Maconochie I, Martinon-Torres F, Pokorn M, Strle F, Tsolia M, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Levin M, Vermont C, Moll Het al., 2021, Development and validation of a prediction model for invasive bacterial infections in febrile children at European Emergency Departments: MOFICHE a prospective observational study, Archives of Disease in Childhood, Vol: 106, Pages: 641-647, ISSN: 0003-9888

Objectives To develop and cross-validate a multivariable clinical prediction model to identify invasive bacterial infections (IBI) and to identify patient groups who might benefit from new biomarkers.Design Prospective observational study.Setting 12 emergency departments (EDs) in 8 European countries.Patients Febrile children aged 0–18 years.Main outcome measures IBI, defined as bacteraemia, meningitis and bone/joint infection. We derived and cross-validated a model for IBI using variables from the Feverkidstool (clinical symptoms, C reactive protein), neurological signs, non-blanching rash and comorbidity. We assessed discrimination (area under the receiver operating curve) and diagnostic performance at different risk thresholds for IBI: sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratios (LRs).Results Of 16 268 patients, 135 (0.8%) had an IBI. The discriminative ability of the model was 0.84 (95% CI 0.81 to 0.88) and 0.78 (95% CI 0.74 to 0.82) in pooled cross-validations. The model performed well for the rule-out threshold of 0.1% (sensitivity 0.97 (95% CI 0.93 to 0.99), negative LR 0.1 (95% CI 0.0 to 0.2) and for the rule-in threshold of 2.0% (specificity 0.94 (95% CI 0.94 to 0.95), positive LR 8.4 (95% CI 6.9 to 10.0)). The intermediate thresholds of 0.1%–2.0% performed poorly (ranges: sensitivity 0.59–0.93, negative LR 0.14–0.57, specificity 0.52–0.88, positive LR 1.9–4.8) and comprised 9784 patients (60%).Conclusions The rule-out threshold of this model has potential to reduce antibiotic treatment while the rule-in threshold could be used to target treatment in febrile children at the ED. In more than half of patients at intermediate risk, sensitive biomarkers could improve identification of IBI and potentially reduce unnecessary antibiotic prescriptions.

Journal article

Van de Voorde P, Turner NM, Djakow J, de Lucas N, Martinez-Mejias A, Biarent D, Bingham R, Brissaud O, Hoffmann F, Johannesdottir GB, Lauritsen T, Maconochie Iet al., 2021, Paediatric Life Support European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2021, NOTFALL & RETTUNGSMEDIZIN, Vol: 24, Pages: 650-719, ISSN: 1434-6222

Journal article

Perkins GD, Gräsner JT, Semeraro F, Olasveengen T, Soar J, Lott C, Van de Voorde P, Madar J, Zideman D, Mentzelopoulos S, Bossaert L, Greif R, Monsieurs K, Svavarsdóttir H, Nolan JP, Ainsworth S, Deakin CD, Lippert F, Sandroni C, Akin S, Delchef J, Lockey AS, Sari F, Alfonzo A, Dirks B, Scapigliati A, Andres J, Djakow J, Lulic I, Schilder S, Attard Montalto S, Djarv T, Maas M, Schlieber J, Barelli A, Druwe P, Maconochie I, Schnaubelt S, Baubin M, Eldin G, Madar J, Semeraro F, Behringer W, Ersdal H, Martinez-Mejias A, Shammet S, Bein B, Friberg H, Masterson S, Singletary EM, Biarent D, Genbrugge C, Skåre C, Bingham R, Georgiou M, Meyran D, Skrifvars MB, Blom M, Goemans E, Monsieurs KG, Smyth M, Boccuzzi A, González-Salvado V, Morley C, Soar J, Borra V, Gradisek P, Moulaert VRM, Bossaert L, Gräsner JT, Mpotos N, Szczapa T, Böttiger BW, Greif R, Nikolaou N, Taccone F, Breckwoldt J, Handley AJ, Nolan JP, Tageldin Mustafa M, Brissaud O, Hassager C, Olasveengen TM, Te Pas A, Burkart R, Haywood K, Oliver E, Thies KC, Cariou A, Heltne JK, Paal P, Tjelmeland IBM, Carli P, Hendrickx D, Pellis T, Trevisanuto D, Carmona Fet al., 2021, Corrigendum to “European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2021: Executive summary” [Resuscitation (2021) 1–60] (Resuscitation (2021) 161 (1–60), (S0300957221000551), (10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.02.003)), Resuscitation, Vol: 163, Pages: 97-98, ISSN: 0300-9572

The authors regret that the list of the ERC 2021 Guidelines Collaborators which were included in Appendix A was incomplete. The complete list of collaborators is provided below: [Table presented] The authors would like to apologise for any inconvenience caused.

Journal article

Li E, Dewez JE, Luu Q, Emonts M, Maconochie I, Nijman R, Yeung Set al., 2021, Role of point-of-care tests in the management of febrile children: a qualitative study of hospital-based doctors and nurses in England, BMJ Open, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives The use of rapid point-of-care tests (POCTs) has been advocated for improving patient management and outcomes and for optimising antibiotic prescribing. However, few studies have explored healthcare workers’ views about their use in febrile children. The aim of this study was to explore the perceptions of hospital-based doctors and nurses regarding the use of POCTs in England.Study design Qualitative in-depth interviews with purposively selected hospital doctors and nurses. Data were analysed thematically.Setting Two university teaching hospitals in London and Newcastle.Participants 24 participants (paediatricians, emergency department doctors, trainee paediatricians and nurses).Results There were diverse views about the use of POCTs in febrile children. The reported advantages included their ease of use and the rapid availability of results. They were seen to contribute to faster clinical decision-making; the targeting of antibiotic use; improvements in patient care, flow and monitoring; cohorting (ie, the physical clustering of hospitalised patients with the same infection to limit spread) and enhancing communication with parents. These advantages were less evident when the turnaround for results of laboratory tests was 1–2 hours. Factors such as clinical experience and specialty, as well as the availability of guidelines recommending POCT use, were also perceived as influential. However, in addition to their perceived inaccuracy, participants were concerned about POCTs not resolving diagnostic uncertainty or altering clinical management, leading to a commonly expressed preference for relying on clinical skills rather than test results solely.Conclusion In this study conducted at two university teaching hospitals in England, participants expressed mixed opinions about the utility of current POCTs in the management of febrile children. Understanding the current clinical decision-making process and the specific needs and preferences of clinici

Journal article

Honeyford K, Coughlan C, Nijman R, Expert P, Burcea G, Maconochie I, Kinderlerer A, Cooke G, Costelloe Cet al., 2021, Changes in emergency department activity and the first COVID-19 lockdown; a cross sectional study, Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health, Vol: 22, Pages: 603-607, ISSN: 1936-900X

BackgroundEmergency Department (ED) attendances fell across the UK after the ‘lockdown’ introduced on 23rd March 2020 to limit the spread of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We hypothesised that reductions would vary by patient age and disease type. We examined pre- and in-lockdown ED attendances for two COVID-19 unrelated diagnoses; one likely to be affected by lockdown measures (gastroenteritis) and one likely to be unaffected (appendicitis). MethodsRetrospective cross-sectional study conducted across two EDs in one London hospital Trust. We compared all adult and paediatric ED attendances, before (January 2020) and during lockdown (March/April 2020). Key patient demographics, method of arrival and discharge location were compared. We used SNOMED codes to define attendances for gastroenteritis and appendicitis. ResultsED attendances fell from 1129 per day before lockdown to 584 in-lockdown; 51.7% of pre-lockdown rates. In-lockdown attendances were lowest for under-18s (16.0% of pre-lockdown). The proportion of patients admitted to hospital increased from 17.3% to 24.0% and the proportion admitted to intensive care increased four-fold. Attendances for gastroenteritis fell from 511 to 103; 20.2% of pre-lockdown rates. Attendances for appendicitis also decreased, from 144 to 41; 28.5% of pre-lockdown rates.ConclusionED attendances fell substantially following lockdown implementation. The biggest reduction was for under-18s. We observed reductions in attendances for gastroenteritis and appendicitis. This may reflect lower rates of infectious disease transmission, though the fall in appendicitis-related attendances suggests that behavioural factors are also important. Larger studies are urgently needed to understand changing patterns of ED use and access to emergency care during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Journal article

Borensztajn D, Zachariasse JM, Greber-Platzer S, Alves CF, Freitas P, Smit FJ, van der Lei J, Steyerberg EW, Maconochie I, Moll HAet al., 2021, Shortness of breath in children at the emergency department: Variability in management in Europe, PLOS ONE, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Hagedoorn N, Wagenaar J, Nieboer D, Bath D, von Both U, Carrol E, Eleftheriou I, Emonts M, Van Der Flier M, de Groot R, Herberg J, Kohlmaier B, Levin M, Lim E, Maconochie I, Martinon-Torres F, Nijman R, Pokorn M, Rivero Calle I, Tsolia M, Yeung S, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Vermont C, Oostenbrink R, Moll Het al., 2021, Impact of a clinical decision rule on antibiotic prescription for children with suspected lower respiratory tract infections presenting to European emergency departments: a simulation study based on routine data, Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy, Vol: 76, Pages: 1349-1357, ISSN: 0305-7453

Background: Discriminating viral from bacterial lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children is challenging thus commonly resulting in antibiotic overuse. The Feverkidstool, a validated clinical decision rule including clinical symptoms and C-reactive protein, safely reduced antibiotic use in children at low/intermediate risk for bacterial LRTIs in a multicentre trial at emergency departments (EDs) in the Netherlands.Objectives: Using routine data from an observational study, we simulated the impact of the Feverkidstool on antibiotic prescriptions compared with observed antibiotic prescriptions in children with suspected LRTIs at 12 EDs in eight European countries.Methods: We selected febrile children aged 1 month to 5 years with respiratory symptoms and excluded upper respiratory tract infections. Using the Feverkidstool, we calculated individual risks for bacterial LRTI retrospectively. We simulated antibiotic prescription rates under different scenarios: (1) applying effect estimates on antibiotic prescription from the trial; and (2) varying both usage (50%–100%) and compliance (70%–100%) with the Feverkidstool’s advice to withhold antibiotics in children at low/intermediate risk for bacterial LRTI (≤10%).Results: Of 4938 children, 4209 (85.2%) were at low/intermediate risk for bacterial LRTI. Applying effect estimates from the trial, the Feverkidstool reduced antibiotic prescription from 33.5% to 24.1% [pooled risk difference: 9.4% (95% CI: 5.7%–13.1%)]. Simulating 50%–100% usage with 90% compliance resulted in risk differences ranging from 8.3% to 15.8%. Our simulations suggest that antibiotic prescriptions would be reduced in EDs with high baseline antibiotic prescription rates or predominantly (>85%) low/intermediate-risk children.Conclusions: Implementation of the Feverkidstool could reduce antibiotic prescriptions in children with suspected LRTIs in European EDs.

Journal article

Topjian AA, Scholefield BR, Pinto NP, Fink EL, Buysse CMP, Haywood K, Maconochie I, Nadkarni VM, de Caen A, Escalante-Kanashiro R, Ng K-C, Nuthall G, Reis AG, Van de Voorde P, Suskauer SJ, Schexnayder SM, Hazinski MF, Slomine BSet al., 2021, P-COSCA (Pediatric Core Outcome Set for Cardiac Arrest) in Children: An Advisory Statement From the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation., Resuscitation, Vol: 162, Pages: 351-364

Studies of pediatric cardiac arrest use inconsistent outcomes, including return of spontaneous circulation and short-term survival, and basic assessments of functional and neurological status. In 2018, the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation sponsored the COSCA initiative (Core Outcome Set After Cardiac Arrest) to improve consistency in reported outcomes of clinical trials of adult cardiac arrest survivors and supported this P-COSCA initiative (Pediatric COSCA). The P-COSCA Steering Committee generated a list of potential survival, life impact, and economic impact outcomes and assessment time points that were prioritized by a multidisciplinary group of healthcare providers, researchers, and parents/caregivers of children who survived cardiac arrest. Then expert panel discussions achieved consensus on the core outcomes, the methods to measure those core outcomes, and the timing of the measurements. The P-COSCA includes assessment of survival, brain function, cognitive function, physical function, and basic daily life skills. Survival and brain function are assessed at discharge or 30 days (or both if possible) and between 6 and 12 months after arrest. Cognitive function, physical function, and basic daily life skills are assessed between 6 and 12 months after cardiac arrest. Because many children have prearrest comorbidities, the P-COSCA also includes documentation of baseline (ie, prearrest) brain function and calculation of changes after cardiac arrest. Supplementary outcomes of survival, brain function, cognitive function, physical function, and basic daily life skills are assessed at 3 months and beyond 1 year after cardiac arrest if resources are available.

Journal article

Dainty KN, Atkins DL, Breckwoldt J, Maconochie I, Schexnayder SM, Skrifvars MB, Tijssen J, Wyllie J, Furuta M, Aickin R, Acworth J, Atkins D, Couto TB, Guerguerian A-M, Kleinman M, Kloeck D, Nadkarni V, Ng K-C, Nuthall G, Ong Y-KG, Reis A, Rodriguez-Nunez A, Schexnayder S, Scholefield B, Tijssen J, Voorde PVD, Wyckoff M, Liley H, El-Naggar W, Fabres J, Fawke J, Foglia E, Guinsburg R, Hosono S, Isayama T, Kawakami M, Kapadia V, Kim H-S, McKinlay C, Roehr C, Schmolzer G, Sugiura T, Trevisanuto D, Weiner G, Greif R, Bhanji F, Bray J, Breckwoldt J, Cheng A, Duff J, Eastwood K, Gilfoyle E, Hsieh M-J, Lauridsen K, Lockey A, Matsuyama T, Patocka C, Pellegrino J, Sawyer T, Schnaubel S, Yeung J, International Liaison Committee on Resuscitations ILCOR Pediatric, Neonatal Life Support Task Force, Education, Implementation and Teams Task Forceet al., 2021, Family presence during resuscitation in paediatric and neonatal cardiac arrest: A systematic review., Resuscitation, Vol: 162, Pages: 20-34

CONTEXT: Parent/family presence at pediatric resuscitations has been slow to become consistent practice in hospital settings and has not been universally implemented. A systematic review of the literature on family presence during pediatric and neonatal resuscitation has not been previously conducted. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of the published evidence related to family presence during pediatric and neonatal resuscitation. DATA SOURCES: Six major bibliographic databases was undertaken with defined search terms and including literature up to June 14, 2020. STUDY SELECTION: 3200 titles were retrieved in the initial search; 36 ultimately included for review. DATA EXTRACTION: Data was double extracted independently by two reviewers and confirmed with the review team. All eligible studies were either survey or interview-based and as such we turned to narrative systematic review methodology. RESULTS: The authors identified two key sets of findings: first, parents/family members want to be offered the option to be present for their child's resuscitation. Secondly, health care provider attitudes varied widely (ranging from 15% to >85%), however, support for family presence increased with previous experience and level of seniority. LIMITATIONS: English language only; lack of randomized control trials; quality of the publications. CONCLUSIONS: Parents wish to be offered the opportunity to be present but opinions and perspectives on the family presence vary greatly among health care providers. This topic urgently needs high quality, comparative research to measure the actual impact of family presence on patient, family and staff outcomes. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42020140363.

Journal article

Charlton NP, Goolsby CA, Zideman DA, Maconochie IK, Morley PT, Singletary EMet al., 2021, Appropriate Tourniquet Types in the Pediatric Population: A Systematic Review, CUREUS, Vol: 13

Journal article

Van de Voorde P, Turner NM, Djakow J, de Lucas N, Martinez-Mejias A, Biarent D, Bingham R, Brissaud O, Hoffmann F, Johannesdottir GB, Lauritsen T, Maconochie Iet al., 2021, European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2021: Paediatric Life Support, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 161, Pages: 327-387, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Ohshimo S, Wang C-H, Couto TB, Bingham R, Mok YH, Kleinman M, Aickin R, Ziegler C, DeCaen A, Atkins DL, Maconochie I, Rabi Y, Morrison Let al., 2021, Pediatric timing of epinephrine doses: A systematic review, RESUSCITATION, Vol: 160, Pages: 106-117, ISSN: 0300-9572

Journal article

Jones MD, Clarke J, Feather C, Franklin BD, Sinha R, Maconochie I, Darzi A, Appelbaum Net al., 2021, Use of Pediatric Injectable Medicines Guidelines and Associated Medication Administration Errors: A Human Reliability Analysis, Annals of Pharmacotherapy, Pages: 106002802199964-106002802199964, ISSN: 1060-0280

<jats:sec><jats:title>Background:</jats:title><jats:p> In a recent human reliability analysis (HRA) of simulated pediatric resuscitations, ineffective retrieval of preparation and administration instructions from online injectable medicines guidelines was a key factor contributing to medication administration errors (MAEs). </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Objective:</jats:title><jats:p> The aim of the present study was to use a specific HRA to understand where intravenous medicines guidelines are vulnerable to misinterpretation, focusing on deviations from expected practice ( discrepancies) that contributed to large-magnitude and/or clinically significant MAEs. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods:</jats:title><jats:p> Video recordings from the original study were reanalyzed to identify discrepancies in the steps required to find and extract information from the NHS Injectable Medicines Guide (IMG) website. These data were combined with MAE data from the same original study. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results:</jats:title><jats:p> In total, 44 discrepancies during use of the IMG were observed across 180 medication administrations. Of these discrepancies, 21 (48%) were associated with an MAE, 16 of which (36% of 44 discrepancies) made a major contribution to that error. There were more discrepancies (31 in total, 70%) during the steps required to access the correct drug webpage than there were in the steps required to read this information (13 in total, 30%). Discrepancies when using injectable medicines guidelines made a major contribution to 6 (27%) of 22 clinically significant and 4 (15%) of 27 large-magnitude MAEs. </jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusion and Relevance:</jats:title><jats:p> Discrepancies during the use of an online injectable medici

Journal article

Honeyford C, Costelloe C, Expert P, Nijman R, Maconochie I, Burcea G, Kinderlerer A, Cooke G, Coughlan Cet al., 2021, Changes in Emergency Department attendances before and after COVID-19 lockdown implementation: a cross sectional study of one urban NHS Hospital Trust, Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : Integrating Emergency Care with Population Health, ISSN: 1936-900X

Journal article

Zachariasse J, Maconochie I, Nijman R, Greber-Platzer S, Smit F, Nieboer D, van der Lei J, Alves C, Moll Het al., 2021, Improving the prioritization of children at the emergency department: updating the Manchester Triage System using vital signs, PLoS One, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-6203

Background:Vital signs are used in emergency care settings in the first assessment of children to identify those that need immediate attention. We aimed to develop and validate vital sign based Manchester Triage System (MTS) discriminators to improve triage of children at the emergency department.Methods and findings:The TrIAGE project is a prospective observational study based on electronic health record data from five European EDs (Netherlands (n = 2), United Kingdom, Austria, and Portugal). In the current study, we included 117,438 consecutive children <16 years presenting to the ED during the study period (2012–2015). We derived new discriminators based on heart rate, respiratory rate, and/or capillary refill time for specific subgroups of MTS flowcharts. Moreover, we determined the optimal cut-off value for each vital sign. The main outcome measure was a previously developed 3-category reference standard (high, intermediate, low urgency) for the required urgency of care, based on mortality at the ED, immediate lifesaving interventions, disposition and resource use. We determined six new discriminators for children <1 year and ≥1 year: “Very abnormal respiratory rate”, “Abnormal heart rate”, and “Abnormal respiratory rate”, with optimal cut-offs, and specific subgroups of flowcharts. Application of the modified MTS reclassified 744 patients (2.5%). Sensitivity increased from 0.66 (95%CI 0.60–0.72) to 0.71 (0.66–0.75) for high urgency patients and from 0.67 (0.54–0.76) to 0.70 (0.58–0.80) for high and intermediate urgency patients. Specificity decreased from 0.90 (0.86–0.93) to 0.89 (0.85–0.92) for high and 0.66 (0.52–0.78) to 0.63 (0.50–0.75) for high and intermediate urgency patients. These differences were statistically significant. Overall performance improved (R2 0.199 versus 0.204).Conclusions:Six new discriminators based on vital signs lead to a small but rel

Journal article

Goodacre S, Thomas B, Lee E, Sutton L, Loban A, Waterhouse S, Simmonds R, Biggs K, Marincowitz C, Schutter J, Connelly S, Sheldon E, Hall J, Young E, Bentley A, Challen K, Fitzsimmons C, Harris T, Lecky F, Lee A, Maconochie I, Walter Det al., 2021, Post-exertion oxygen saturation as a prognostic factor for adverse outcome in patients attending the emergency department with suspected COVID-19: a substudy of the PRIEST observational cohort study, EMERGENCY MEDICINE JOURNAL, Vol: 38, Pages: 88-93, ISSN: 1472-0205

Journal article

Drennan IR, Geri G, Brooks S, Couper K, Hatanaka T, Kudenchuk P, Olasveengen T, Pellegrino J, Schexnayder SM, Morley P, Basic Life Support BLS, Pediatric Life Support PLS and Education, Implementation and Teams EIT Taskforces of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation ILCOR, BLS Task Force, Pediatric Task Force, EIT Task Forceet al., 2021, Diagnosis of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest by emergency medical dispatch: A diagnostic systematic review., Resuscitation, Vol: 159, Pages: 85-96

INTRODUCTION: Cardiac arrest is a time-sensitive condition requiring urgent intervention. Prompt and accurate recognition of cardiac arrest by emergency medical dispatchers at the time of the emergency call is a critical early step in cardiac arrest management allowing for initiation of dispatcher-assisted bystander CPR and appropriate and timely emergency response. The overall accuracy of dispatchers in recognizing cardiac arrest is not known. It is also not known if there are specific call characteristics that impact the ability to recognize cardiac arrest. METHODS: We performed a systematic review to examine dispatcher recognition of cardiac arrest as well as to identify call characteristics that may affect their ability to recognize cardiac arrest at the time of emergency call. We searched electronic databases for terms related to "emergency medical dispatcher", "cardiac arrest", and "diagnosis", among others, with a focus on studies that allowed for calculating diagnostic test characteristics (e.g. sensitivity and specificity). The review was consistent with Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) method for evidence evaluation. RESULTS: We screened 2520 article titles, resulting in 47 studies included in this review. There was significant heterogeneity between studies with a high risk of bias in 18 of the 47 which precluded performing meta-analyses. The reported sensitivities for cardiac arrest recognition ranged from 0.46 to 0.98 whereas specificities ranged from 0.32 to 1.00. There were no obvious differences in diagnostic accuracy between different dispatching criteria/algorithms or with the level of education of dispatchers. CONCLUSION: The sensitivity and specificity of cardiac arrest recognition at the time of emergency call varied across dispatch centres and did not appear to differ by dispatch algorithm/criteria used or education of the dispatcher, although comparisons were hampered by he

Journal article

Goodacre S, Thomas B, Sutton L, Burnsall M, Lee E, Bradburn M, Loban A, Waterhouse S, Simmonds R, Biggs K, Marincowitz C, Schutter J, Connelly S, Sheldon E, Hall J, Young E, Bentley A, Challen K, Fitzsimmons C, Harris T, Lecky F, Lee A, Maconochie I, Walter Det al., 2021, Derivation and validation of a clinical severity score for acutely ill adults with suspected COVID-19: The PRIEST observational cohort study, PLOS ONE, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Borensztajn D, Hagedoorn N, Rivero Calle I, Maconochie I, von Both U, Carrol E, Dewez J, Emonts M, Van Der Flier M, de Groot R, Herberg J, Kohlmaier B, Lim E, Martinon-Torres F, Nieboer D, Nijman R, Pokorn M, Strle F, Tsolia M, Vermont C, Yeung S, Zavadska D, Zenz W, Levin M, Moll Het al., 2021, Variation in hospital admission in febrile children evaluated at the Emergency Department (ED) in Europe: PERFORM, a multicentre prospective observational study, PLoS One, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-6203

ObjectivesHospitalisation is frequently used as a marker of disease severity in observational Emergency Department (ED) studies. The comparison of ED admission rates is complex in potentially being influenced by the characteristics of the region, ED, physician and patient. We aimed to study variation in ED admission rates of febrile children, to assess whether variation could be explained by disease severity and to identify patient groups with large variation, in order to use this to reduce unnecessary health care utilization that is often due to practice variation.DesignMOFICHE (Management and Outcome of Fever in children in Europe, part of the PERFORM study, www.perform2020.org), is a prospective cohort study using routinely collected data on febrile children regarding patient characteristics (age, referral, vital signs and clinical alarming signs), diagnostic tests, therapy, diagnosis and hospital admission.Setting and participantsData were collected on febrile children aged 0–18 years presenting to 12 European EDs (2017–2018).Main outcome measuresWe compared admission rates between EDs by using standardised admission rates after adjusting for patient characteristics and initiated tests at the ED, where standardised rates >1 demonstrate higher admission rates than expected and rates <1 indicate lower rates than expected based on the ED patient population.ResultsWe included 38,120 children. Of those, 9.695 (25.4%) were admitted to a general ward (range EDs 5.1–54.5%). Adjusted standardised admission rates ranged between 0.6 and 1.5. The largest variation was seen in short admission rates (0.1–5.0), PICU admission rates (0.2–2.2), upper respiratory tract infections (0.4–1.7) and fever without focus (0.5–2.7). Variation was small in sepsis/meningitis (0.9–1.1).ConclusionsLarge variation exists in admission rates of febrile children evaluated at European EDs, however, this variation is largely reduced after correc

Journal article

Perkins GD, Gräsner JT, Semeraro F, Olasveengen T, Soar J, Lott C, Van de Voorde P, Madar J, Zideman D, Mentzelopoulos S, Bossaert L, Greif R, Monsieurs K, Svavarsdóttir H, Nolan JP, Akin S, Andres J, Baubin M, Behringer W, Boccuzzi A, Böttiger B, Burkart R, Carli P, Cassan P, Christophides T, Cimpoesu D, Clarens C, Delchef J, De Roovere A, Dirks B, Eldin G, Khalifa G, Friberg H, Goemans E, Gradisek P, Hassager C, Heltne JK, Hendrickx D, Hunyadi Anticevic S, Koppl J, Kreimeier U, Kuzovlev A, Maas M, Maconochie I, Attard Montalto S, Mpotos N, Tageldin Mustafa M, Nikolaou N, Pitches K, Raffay V, Renier W, Ristagno G, Safri S, Sanchez Santos L, Schilder S, Truhlar A, Trummer G, Vaahersalo J, Van Grootven H, Wyllie Jet al., 2021, Executive summary: European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2021, Notfall und Rettungsmedizin, ISSN: 1434-6222

Informed by a series of systematic reviews, scoping reviews and evidence updates from the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, the 2021 European Resuscitation Council Guidelines present the most up to date evidence-based guidelines for the practice of resuscitation across Europe. The guidelines cover the epidemiology of cardiac arrest; the role that systems play in saving lives, adult basic life support, adult advanced life support, resuscitation in special circumstances, post resuscitation care, first aid, neonatal life support, paediatric life support, ethics and education.

Journal article

Zachariasse JM, Espina PR, Borensztajn DM, Nieboer D, Maconochie IK, Steyerberg EW, van der Lei J, Greber-Platzer S, Moll HAet al., 2021, Improving triage for children with comorbidity using the ED-PEWS: An observational study, Archives of Disease in Childhood, ISSN: 0003-9888

To assess the value of the Emergency Department–Pediatric Early Warning Score (ED-PEWS) for triage of children with comorbidity. Secondary analysis of a prospective cohort. 53 829 consecutive ED visits of children <16 years in three European hospitals (Netherlands, UK and Austria) participating in the TrIAGE (Triage Improvements Across General Emergency departments) project in different periods (2012–2015). ED-PEWS, a score consisting of age and six physiological parameters. A three-category reference standard as proxy for true patient urgency. We assessed discrimination and calibration of the ED-PEWS for children with comorbidity (complex and non-complex) and without comorbidity. In addition, we evaluated the value of adding the ED-PEWS to the routinely used Manchester Triage System (MTS). 5053 (9%) children had underlying non-complex morbidity and 5537 (10%) had complex comorbidity. The c-statistic for identification of high-urgency patients was 0.86 (95% prediction interval 0.84–0.88) for children without comorbidity, 0.87 (0.82–0.92) for non-complex and 0.86 (0.84–0.88) for complex comorbidity. For high and intermediate urgency, the c-statistic was 0.63 (0.62–0.63), 0.63 (0.61–0.65) and 0.63 (0.55–0.73) respectively. Sensitivity was slightly higher for children with comorbidity (0.73–0.75 vs 0.70) at the cost of a lower specificity (0.86–0.87 vs 0.92). Calibration was largely similar. Adding the ED-PEWS to the MTS for children with comorbidity improved performance, except in the setting with few high-urgency patients. The ED-PEWS has a similar performance in children with and without comorbidity. Adding the ED-PEWS to the MTS for children with comorbidity improves triage, except in the setting with few high-urgency patients. Through a secondary analysis, the authors assessed the value of the ED-Pediatric Early Warning Score (ED-PEWS) for triage of children with comorbidity. They found that ED-PEWS ha

Journal article

Maconochie IK, Aickin R, Hazinski MF, Atkins DL, Bingham R, Bittencourt Couto T, Guerguerian A-M, Nadkarni VM, Ng K-C, Nuthall GA, Ong GYK, Reis AG, Schexnayder SM, Scholefield BR, Tijssen JA, Nolan JP, Morley PT, Van de Voorde P, Zaritsky AL, de Caen AR, Pediatric Life Support Collaboratorset al., 2021, Pediatric Life Support 2020 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations., Pediatrics, Vol: 147

This 2020 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations (CoSTR) for pediatric life support is based on the most extensive evidence evaluation ever performed by the Pediatric Life Support Task Force. Three types of evidence evaluation were used in this review: systematic reviews, scoping reviews, and evidence updates. Per agreement with the evidence evaluation recommendations of the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation, only systematic reviews could result in a new or revised treatment recommendation.Systematic reviews performed for this 2020 CoSTR for pediatric life support included the topics of sequencing of airway-breaths-compressions versus compressions-airway-breaths in the delivery of pediatric basic life support, the initial timing and dose intervals for epinephrine administration during resuscitation, and the targets for oxygen and carbon dioxide levels in pediatric patients after return of spontaneous circulation. The most controversial topics included the initial timing and dose intervals of epinephrine administration (new treatment recommendations were made) and the administration of fluid for infants and children with septic shock (this latter topic was evaluated by evidence update). All evidence reviews identified the paucity of pediatric data and the need for more research involving resuscitation of infants and children.

Journal article

Chang SSY, Lim AZ, Ong GY-K, Piragasam R, Allen JC, Ng KC, Maconochie I, Chong S-Let al., 2021, Predictors of serious bacterial infections using serum biomarkers in an infant population aged 0 to 90 days: a prospective cohort study., BMJ Paediatr Open, Vol: 5

Objective: Young febrile infants represent a vulnerable population at risk for serious bacterial infections (SBI). We aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of components of the complete blood count in comparison with C-reactive protein (CRP) to predict SBI among febrile infants. Design and setting: Prospective cohort study conducted in a tertiary emergency department between December 2018 and November 2019. Patients: We included febrile infants ≤3 months old with complete blood count results. We analysed their white blood cell count (WBC), absolute neutrophil ratio (ANC), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet to lymphocyte ratio, mean platelet volume to platelet count ratio, and compared these to the performance of CRP. Main outcome measures: SBIs were defined as urinary tract infection, bacteraemia, bacterial meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia, skin and soft tissue infection, bacterial enteritis, septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Results: Of the 187 infants analysed, 54 (28.9%) were diagnosed with SBI. Median values of WBC, ANC, NLR and CRP were significantly higher in infants with SBI: WBC (13.8 vs 11.4×109/L, p=0.004), ANC (6.7 vs 4.1×109/L, p<0.001), NLR (1.3 vs 0.9, p=0.001) and CRP (21.0 vs 2.3 mg/L, p<0.001), compared with those without. CRP had the best discriminatory values for SBI, with area under the curve (AUC) of 0.815 (95% CI 0.747 to 0.883), compared with WBC, ANC and NLR. A predictive model consisting of WBC, ANC and NLR in combination with clinical parameters, had an AUC of 0.814 (95% CI 0.746 to 0.883). There was increased discriminative performance when this predictive model was combined with CRP, (AUC of 0.844, 95% CI 0.782 to 0.906). Conclusion: In young febrile infants, CRP was the best discriminatory biomarker for SBI. WBC, ANC and NLR when used in combination have potential diagnostic utility in this population.

Journal article

Bressan S, Buonsenso D, Farrugia R, Parri N, Oostenbrink R, Titomanlio L, Roland D, Nijman RG, Maconochie I, Da Dalt L, Mintegi Set al., 2020, Preparedness and response to Pediatric CoVID-19 in European Emergency Departments: a survey of the REPEM and PERUKI networks, Annals of Emergency Medicine, Vol: 76, Pages: 788-800, ISSN: 0196-0644

Study objectiveWe aimed to describe the variability and identify gaps in preparedness and response to the COVID-19 pandemic in European EDs caring for children.MethodsA cross-sectional point prevalence survey, was developed and disseminated through the pediatric emergency medicine research networks for Europe (REPEM) and the United Kingdom and Ireland (PERUKI). We aimed to include ten EDs for countries with > 20 million inhabitants and five EDs for less populated countries, unless the number of eligible EDs was below five. ED directors or their delegates completed the survey between March 20th and 21st to report practice at that time. We used descriptive statistics to analyse data.ResultsOverall 102 centers from 18 countries (86% response rate) completed the survey: 34% did not have an ED contingency plan for pandemics and 36% had never had simulations for such events. Wide variation on PPE items was shown for recommended PPE use at pre-triage and for patient assessment, with 62% of centers experiencing shortage in one or more PPE items, most frequently FFP2/N95 masks. Only 17% of EDs had negative pressure isolation rooms. COVID-19 positive ED staff was reported in 25% of centers.ConclusionWe found variation and identified gaps in preparedness and response to the COVID-19 epidemic across European referral EDs for children. A lack in early availability of a documented contingency plan, provision of simulation training, appropriate use of PPE, and appropriate isolation facilities emerged as gaps that should be optimized to improve preparedness and inform responses to future pandemics.

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00306323&limit=30&person=true