Imperial College London

DrJamesBentham

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Research Associate
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2547j.bentham CV

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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18 results found

Pearson-Stuttard J, Zhou B, Kontis V, Bentham J, Gunter MJ, Ezzati Met al., 2018, Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to diabetes and high body-mass index: a comparative risk assessment, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 6, Pages: 95-104, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Zhou B, Kontis V, Bentham J, Gunter MJ, Ezzati Met al., 2018, Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to diabetes and high body-mass index: a comparative risk assessment, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 6, Pages: E6-E15, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Ezzati M, Di Cesare M, Bentham J, 2018, Determining the worldwide prevalence of obesity reply, LANCET, Vol: 391, Pages: 1774-1774, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Zhou B, Kontis V, Bentham J, Gunter M, Ezzati Met al., 2017, Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to diabetes and high body-mass index: a comparative risk assessment, Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vol: 6, Pages: 95-104, ISSN: 2213-8595

BackgroundDiabetes and high body-mass index (BMI) are associated with increased risk of several cancers, and are increasing in prevalence in most countries. We estimated the cancer incidence attributable to diabetes and high BMI as individual risk factors and in combination, by country and sex.MethodsWe estimated population attributable fractions for 12 cancers by age and sex for 175 countries in 2012. We defined high BMI as a BMI greater than or equal to 25 kg/m2. We used comprehensive prevalence estimates of diabetes and BMI categories in 2002, assuming a 10-year lag between exposure to diabetes or high BMI and incidence of cancer, combined with relative risks from published estimates, to quantify contribution of diabetes and high BMI to site-specific cancers, individually and combined as independent risk factors and in a conservative scenario in which we assumed full overlap of risk of diabetes and high BMI. We then used GLOBOCAN cancer incidence data to estimate the number of cancer cases attributable to the two risk factors. We also estimated the number of cancer cases in 2012 that were attributable to increases in the prevalence of diabetes and high BMI from 1980 to 2002. All analyses were done at individual country level and grouped by region for reporting.FindingsWe estimated that 5·6% of all incident cancers in 2012 were attributable to the combined effects of diabetes and high BMI as independent risk factors, corresponding to 792 600 new cases. 187 600 (24·5%) of 766 000 cases of liver cancer and 121 700 (38·4%) of 317 000 cases of endometrial cancer were attributable to these risk factors. In the conservative scenario, about 4·5% (626 900 new cases) of all incident cancers assessed were attributable to diabetes and high BMI combined. Individually, high BMI (544 300 cases) was responsible for twice as many cancer cases as diabetes (280 100 cases). 26·1% of diabetes-related cancers (equating to 77 000 new cases) and 31&mid

Journal article

NCD Risk Factor Collaboration NCD-RisC, Bentham J, NCD Risk Factor Collaboration NCD-RisC, 2017, Worldwide trends in body-mass index, underweight, overweight, and obesity from 1975 to 2016: a pooled analysis of 2416 population-based measurement studies in 128·9 million children, adolescents, and adults., Lancet, Vol: 390, Pages: 2627-2642, ISSN: 0140-6736

BACKGROUND: Underweight, overweight, and obesity in childhood and adolescence are associated with adverse health consequences throughout the life-course. Our aim was to estimate worldwide trends in mean body-mass index (BMI) and a comprehensive set of BMI categories that cover underweight to obesity in children and adolescents, and to compare trends with those of adults. METHODS: We pooled 2416 population-based studies with measurements of height and weight on 128·9 million participants aged 5 years and older, including 31·5 million aged 5-19 years. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2016 in 200 countries for mean BMI and for prevalence of BMI in the following categories for children and adolescents aged 5-19 years: more than 2 SD below the median of the WHO growth reference for children and adolescents (referred to as moderate and severe underweight hereafter), 2 SD to more than 1 SD below the median (mild underweight), 1 SD below the median to 1 SD above the median (healthy weight), more than 1 SD to 2 SD above the median (overweight but not obese), and more than 2 SD above the median (obesity). FINDINGS: Regional change in age-standardised mean BMI in girls from 1975 to 2016 ranged from virtually no change (-0·01 kg/m(2) per decade; 95% credible interval -0·42 to 0·39, posterior probability [PP] of the observed decrease being a true decrease=0·5098) in eastern Europe to an increase of 1·00 kg/m(2) per decade (0·69-1·35, PP>0·9999) in central Latin America and an increase of 0·95 kg/m(2) per decade (0·64-1·25, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. The range for boys was from a non-significant increase of 0·09 kg/m(2) per decade (-0·33 to 0·49, PP=0·6926) in eastern Europe to an increase of 0·77 kg/m(2) per decade (0·50-1·06, PP>0·9999) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Tre

Journal article

Kengne AP, Bentham J, Zhou B, Taddei C, Chan Q, Elliott P, Ezzati M, Mbanya JCN, Kenge AP, Bentham J, Zhou B, Bixby H, Taddei C, Chan Q, Elliott P, Ezzati M, Mbanya JCN, Kengne AP, Bentham J, Zhou B, Peer N, Matsha TE, Bixby H, Di Cesare M, Hajifathalian K, Lu Y, Taddei C, Bovet P, Kyobutungi C, Danaei G, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Ezzati M, Mbanya JCN, bentham J, Zhou B, bixby H, taddei C, Chan Q, Elliott P, Ezzati Met al., 2017, Trends in obesity and diabetes across regions in Africa from 1980 to 2014: an analysis of pooled population-based studies., International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 46, Pages: 1421-1432, ISSN: 1464-3685

Background: The 2016 Dar Es Salaam Call to Action on Diabetes and other NCDs advocates national multi-sectoral NCD strategies and action plans based on available data and information from countries of sub-Saharan Africa and beyond. We estimated trends, from 1980 to 2014, in age-standardised mean body mass index (BMI) and diabetes prevalence in these countries in order to assess the co-progression and assist policy formulation. Methods: We pooled data from African and world-wide population-based studies which measured height, weight, and biomarkers to assess diabetes status in adults aged >18 years. A Bayesian hierarchical model was used to estimate trends, by sex, for 200 countries and territories including 53 countries across five African regions, (central, eastern, northern, southern and western) in mean BMI and diabetes prevalence (defined as either fasting plasma glucose of >7.0 mmol/L, history of diabetes diagnosis, or use of insulin or oral glucose control agents). Results African data came from 245 population-based surveys (1.2 million participants) for BMI and 76 surveys (182 000 participants) for diabetes prevalence estimates. Countries with the highest number of data sources for BMI were South Africa (n=17), Nigeria (n=15) and Egypt (n=13); and for diabetes estimates, Tanzania (n=8), Tunisia (n=7), Cameroon, Egypt and South Africa (all n=6). The age-standardised mean BMI increased from 21.0 kg/m2 (95% credible interval: 20.3-21.7) to 23.0 kg/m2 (22.7-23.3) in men, and from 21.9 kg/m2 (21.3-22.5) to 24.9 kg/m2 (24.6-25.1) in women. The age-standardised prevalence of diabetes increased from 3.4% (1.5-6.3) to 8.5% (6.5-10.8) in men, and from 4.1% (2.0-7.5) to 8.9 % (6.9-11.2) in women. Estimates in northern and southern regions were mostly higher than the global average; those in central, eastern and western regions were lower than global averages. A positive association (correlation coefficient ≃0.9) was observed between mean BMI and diabetes prevalenc

Journal article

Ueda P, Woodward M, Lu Y, Hajifathalian K, Al-Wotayan R, Aguilar-Salinas CA, Ahmadvand A, Azizi F, Bentham J, Cifkova R, Di Cesare M, Eriksen L, Farzadfar F, Ferguson TS, Ikeda N, Khalili D, Khang YH, Lanska V, León-Muñoz L, Magliano DJ, Margozzini P, Msyamboza KP, Mutungi G, Oh K, Oum S, Rodríguez-Artalejo F, Rojas-Martinez R, Valdivia G, Wilks R, Shaw JE, Stevens GA, Tolstrup JS, Zhou B, Salomon JA, Ezzati M, Danaei Get al., 2017, Laboratory-based and office-based risk scores and charts to predict 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease in 182 countries: a pooled analysis of prospective cohorts and health surveys., Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology, Vol: 5, Pages: 196-213, ISSN: 2213-8595

BACKGROUND: Worldwide implementation of risk-based cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention requires risk prediction tools that are contemporarily recalibrated for the target country and can be used where laboratory measurements are unavailable. We present two cardiovascular risk scores, with and without laboratory-based measurements, and the corresponding risk charts for 182 countries to predict 10-year risk of fatal and non-fatal CVD in adults aged 40-74 years. METHODS: Based on our previous laboratory-based prediction model (Globorisk), we used data from eight prospective studies to estimate coefficients of the risk equations using proportional hazard regressions. The laboratory-based risk score included age, sex, smoking, blood pressure, diabetes, and total cholesterol; in the non-laboratory (office-based) risk score, we replaced diabetes and total cholesterol with BMI. We recalibrated risk scores for each sex and age group in each country using country-specific mean risk factor levels and CVD rates. We used recalibrated risk scores and data from national surveys (using data from adults aged 40-64 years) to estimate the proportion of the population at different levels of CVD risk for ten countries from different world regions as examples of the information the risk scores provide; we applied a risk threshold for high risk of at least 10% for high-income countries (HICs) and at least 20% for low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) on the basis of national and international guidelines for CVD prevention. We estimated the proportion of men and women who were similarly categorised as high risk or low risk by the two risk scores. FINDINGS: Predicted risks for the same risk factor profile were generally lower in HICs than in LMICs, with the highest risks in countries in central and southeast Asia and eastern Europe, including China and Russia. In HICs, the proportion of people aged 40-64 years at high risk of CVD ranged from 1% for South Korean women to 42% for

Journal article

Zhou B, Bentham J, Di Cesare M, Bixby H, Danaei G, Cowan MJ, Paciorek CJ, Singh G, Hajifathalian K, Bennett JE, Taddei C, Bilano V, Carrillo-Larco RM, Djalalinia S, Khatibzadeh S, Lugero C, Peykari N, Zhang WZ, Lu Y, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Bovet P, Elliott P, Gu D, Ikeda N, Jackson RT, Joffres M, Kengne AP, Laatikainen T, Lam TH, Laxmaiah A, Liu J, Miranda JJ, Mondo CK, Neuhauser HK, Sundstrom J, Smeeth L, Soric M, Woodward M, Ezzati Met al., 2016, Worldwide trends in blood pressure from 1975 to 2015: a pooled analysis of 1,479 population-based measurement studies with 19.1 million participants, The Lancet, Vol: 389, Pages: 37-55, ISSN: 0140-6736

BackgroundRaised blood pressure is an important risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney disease. We estimated worldwide trends in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of, and number of people with, raised blood pressure, defined as systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher.MethodsFor this analysis, we pooled national, subnational, or community population-based studies that had measured blood pressure in adults aged 18 years and older. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends from 1975 to 2015 in mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure, and the prevalence of raised blood pressure for 200 countries. We calculated the contributions of changes in prevalence versus population growth and ageing to the increase in the number of adults with raised blood pressure.FindingsWe pooled 1479 studies that had measured the blood pressures of 19·1 million adults. Global age-standardised mean systolic blood pressure in 2015 was 127·0 mm Hg (95% credible interval 125·7–128·3) in men and 122·3 mm Hg (121·0–123·6) in women; age-standardised mean diastolic blood pressure was 78·7 mm Hg (77·9–79·5) for men and 76·7 mm Hg (75·9–77·6) for women. Global age-standardised prevalence of raised blood pressure was 24·1% (21·4–27·1) in men and 20·1% (17·8–22·5) in women in 2015. Mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressure decreased substantially from 1975 to 2015 in high-income western and Asia Pacific countries, moving these countries from having some of the highest worldwide blood pressure in 1975 to the lowest in 2015. Mean blood pressure also decreased in women in central and eastern Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and, more recently, central Asia, Middle East, and north Africa, but the es

Journal article

Bentham J, Di Cesare M, Stevens GA, Zhou B, Bixby H, Cowan M, Fortunato L, Bennett J, Danaei G, Hajifathalian K, Lu Y, Riley LM, Laxmaiah A, Kontis V, Paciorek CJ, Riboli E, Ezzati M, Chan Q, Elliott P, Gunter M, Hihtaniemi IT, Murphy N, Norat T, Riboli E, Vineis P, NCD Risk Factor Collaboration NCD-RisCet al., 2016, A century of trends in adult human height, eLife, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2050-084X

Being taller is associated with enhanced longevity, and higher education and earnings. We reanalysed 1472 population-based studies, with measurement of height on more than 18.6 million participants to estimate mean height for people born between 1896 and 1996 in 200 countries. The largest gain in adult height over the past century has occurred in South Korean women and Iranian men, who became 20.2 cm (95% credible interval 17.5–22.7) and 16.5 cm (13.3–19.7) taller, respectively. In contrast, there was little change in adult height in some sub-Saharan African countries and in South Asia over the century of analysis. The tallest people over these 100 years are men born in the Netherlands in the last quarter of 20th century, whose average heights surpassed 182.5 cm, and the shortest were women born in Guatemala in 1896 (140.3 cm; 135.8–144.8). The height differential between the tallest and shortest populations was 19-20 cm a century ago, and has remained the same for women and increased for men a century later despite substantial changes in the ranking of countries.

Journal article

Morris DL, Sheng Y, Zhang Y, Wang Y-F, Zhu Z, Tombleson P, Chen L, Cunninghame Graham DS, Bentham J, Roberts AL, Chen R, Zuo X, Wang T, Wen L, Yang C, Liu L, Yang L, Li F, Huang Y, Yin X, Yang S, Rönnblom L, Fürnrohr BG, Voll RE, Schett G, Costedoat-Chalumeau N, Gaffney PM, Lau YL, Zhang X, Yang W, Cui Y, Vyse TJet al., 2016, Genome-wide association meta-analysis in Chinese and European individuals identifies ten new loci associated with systemic lupus erythematosus., Nature Genetics, Vol: 48, Pages: 940-946, ISSN: 1546-1718

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; OMIM 152700) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease. Over 50 loci have been found to be robustly associated by GWAS in single ethnicities. We combined three GWAS’ datasets from two ethnicities: Chinese (1,659 cases and 3,398 controls) and European (4,036 cases and 6,959controls). A meta–analysis of these studies found that over half of the published SLE genetic associations are present in both populations. A replication study in the Chinese (3,043 cases and 5,074 controls) and Europeans (2,643 cases and 9,032 controls) found 10 novel SLE loci. Our study reveals further evidence that the majorityof genetic polymorphisms exerting risk for SLE are contained within the same regions across the Chinese and European populations. Furthermore, comparing risk allele frequencies and genetic risk scores suggests that the increased prevalence of SLE in non–Europeans (including Asians) has a genetic basis.

Journal article

Zhou B, Lu Y, Hajifathalian K, Bentham J, Di Cesare M, Danaei G, Bixby H, Cowan MJ, Ali MK, Taddei C, Lo W-C, Reis-Santos B, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Miranda JJ, Bjerregaard P, Rivera JA, Fouad HM, Ma G, Mbanya JCN, McGarvey ST, Mohan V, Onat A, Ramachandran A, Ben Romdhane H, Paciorek CJ, Bennett JE, Ezzati M, Abdeen ZA, Kadir KA, Abu-Rmeileh NM, Acosta-Cazares B, Adams R, Aekplakorn W, Aguilar-Salinas CA, Agyemang C, Ahmadvand A, Al-Othman AR, Alkerwi A, Amouyel P, Amuzu A, Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Anjana RM, Aounallah-Skhiri H, Aris T, Arlappa N, Arveiler D, Assah FK, Avdicova M, Azizi F, Balakrishna N, Bandosz P, Barbagallo CM, Barcelo A, Batieha AM, Baur LA, Ben Romdhane H, Benet M, Bernabe-Ortiz A, Bharadwaj S, Bhargava SK, Bi Y, Bjerregaard P, Bjertness E, Bjertness MB, Bjorkelund C, Blokstra A, Bo S, Boehm BO, Boissonnet CP, Bovet P, Brajkovich I, Breckenkamp J, Brenner H, Brewster LM, Brian GR, Bruno G, Bugge A, Cabrera de Leon A, Can G, Candido APC, Capuano V, Carlsson AC, Carvalho MJ, Casanueva FF, Casas J-P, Caserta CA, Castetbon K, Chamukuttan S, Chaturvedi N, Chen C-J, Chen F, Chen S, Cheng C-Y, Chetrit A, Chiou S-T, Cho Y, Chudek J, Cifkova R, Claessens F, Concin H, Cooper C, Cooper R, Costanzo S, Cottel D, Cowell C, Crujeiras AB, D'Arrigo G, Dallongeville J, Dankner R, Dauchet L, de Gaetano G, De Henauw S, Deepa M, Dehghan A, Deschamps V, Dhana K, Di Castelnuovo AF, Djalalinia S, Doua K, Drygas W, Du Y, Dzerve V, Egbagbe EE, Eggertsen R, El Ati J, Elosua R, Erasmus RT, Erem C, Ergor G, Eriksen L, Escobedo-de la Pena J, Fall CH, Farzadfar F, Felix-Redondo FJ, Ferguson TS, Fernandez-Berges D, Ferrari M, Ferreccio C, Feskens EJM, Finn JD, Foeger B, Foo LH, Forslund A-S, Fouad HM, Francis DK, Franco MDC, Franco OH, Frontera G, Furusawa T, Gaciong Z, Garnett SP, Gaspoz J-M, Gasull M, Gates L, Geleijnse JM, Ghasemian A, Ghimire A, Giampaoli S, Gianfagna F, Giovannelli J, Giwercman A, Gonzalez Gross M, Gonzalez Rivas JP, Bonet Gorbea M, Gottrand F, Grafnetteet al., 2016, Worldwide trends in diabetes since 1980: a pooled analysis of 751 population-based studies with 4·4 million participants, Lancet, Vol: 387, Pages: 1513-1530, ISSN: 1474-547X

BackgroundOne of the global targets for non-communicable diseases is to halt, by 2025, the rise in the age-standardised adult prevalence of diabetes at its 2010 levels. We aimed to estimate worldwide trends in diabetes, how likely it is for countries to achieve the global target, and how changes in prevalence, together with population growth and ageing, are affecting the number of adults with diabetes.MethodsWe pooled data from population-based studies that had collected data on diabetes through measurement of its biomarkers. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate trends in diabetes prevalence—defined as fasting plasma glucose of 7·0 mmol/L or higher, or history of diagnosis with diabetes, or use of insulin or oral hypoglycaemic drugs—in 200 countries and territories in 21 regions, by sex and from 1980 to 2014. We also calculated the posterior probability of meeting the global diabetes target if post-2000 trends continue.FindingsWe used data from 751 studies including 4 372 000 adults from 146 of the 200 countries we make estimates for. Global age-standardised diabetes prevalence increased from 4·3% (95% credible interval 2·4–7·0) in 1980 to 9·0% (7·2–11·1) in 2014 in men, and from 5·0% (2·9–7·9) to 7·9% (6·4–9·7) in women. The number of adults with diabetes in the world increased from 108 million in 1980 to 422 million in 2014 (28·5% due to the rise in prevalence, 39·7% due to population growth and ageing, and 31·8% due to interaction of these two factors). Age-standardised adult diabetes prevalence in 2014 was lowest in northwestern Europe, and highest in Polynesia and Micronesia, at nearly 25%, followed by Melanesia and the Middle East and north Africa. Between 1980 and 2014 there was little change in age-standardised diabetes prevalence in adult women in continental western Europe, although crude prevalenc

Journal article

Di Cesare M, Bentham J, Stevens GA, Zhou B, Danaei G, Lu Y, Bixby H, Cowan MJ, Riley LM, Hajifathalian K, Fortunato L, Taddei C, Bennett JE, Ikeda N, Khang Y-H, Kyobutungi C, Laxmaiah A, Li Y, Lin H-H, Miranda JJ, Mostafa A, Turley ML, Paciorek CJ, Gunter M, Ezzati M, Abdeen ZA, Hamid ZA, Abu-Rmeileh NM, Acosta-Cazares B, Adams R, Aekplakorn W, Aguilar-Salinas CA, Ahmadvand A, Ahrens W, Ali MM, Alkerwi A, Alvarez-Pedrerol M, Aly E, Amouyel P, Amuzu A, Andersen LB, Anderssen SA, Andrade DS, Anjana RM, Aounallah-Skhiri H, Ariansen I, Aris T, Arlappa N, Arveiler D, Assah FK, Avdicova M, Azizi F, Babu BV, Balakrishna N, Bandosz P, Banegas JR, Barbagallo CM, Barcelo A, Barkat A, Barros MV, Bata I, Batieha AM, Batista RL, Baur LA, Beaglehole R, Ben Romdhane H, Benet M, Bernabe-Ortiz A, Bernotiene G, Bettiol H, Bhagyalaxmi A, Bharadwaj S, Bhargava SK, Bhatti Z, Bhutta ZA, Bi H, Bi Y, Bjerregaard P, Bjertness E, Bjertness MB, Bjorkelund C, Blake M, Blokstra A, Bo S, Bobak M, Boddy LM, Boehm BO, Boeing H, Boissonnet CP, Bongard V, Bovet P, Braeckman L, Bragt MCE, Brajkovich I, Branca F, Breckenkamp J, Brenner H, Brewster LM, Brian GR, Bruno G, Bueno-de-Mesquita HBA, Bugge A, Burns C, Cabrera de Leon A, Cacciottolo J, Cama T, Cameron C, Camolas J, Can G, Candido APC, Capuano V, Cardoso VC, Carvalho MJ, Casanueva FF, Casas J-P, Caserta CA, Castetbon K, Chamukuttan S, Chan AW, Chan Q, Chaturvedi HK, Chaturvedi N, Chen C-J, Chen F, Chen H, Chen S, Chen Z, Cheng C-Y, Chetrit A, Chiolero A, Chiou S-T, Chirita-Emandi A, Cho Y, Christensen K, Chudek J, Cifkova R, Claessens F, Clays E, Concin H, Cooper C, Cooper R, Coppinger TC, Costanzo S, Cottel D, Cowell C, Craig CL, Crujeiras AB, D'Arrigo G, d'Orsi E, Dallongeville J, Damasceno A, Damsgaard CT, Danaei G, Dankner R, Dauchet L, De Backer G, De Bacquer D, de Gaetano G, De Henauw S, De Smedt D, Deepa M, Deev AD, Dehghan A, Delisle H, Delpeuch F, Dhana K, Di Castelnuovo AF, Dias-da-Costa JS, Diaz A, Djalalinia S, Do HTP, Dobson AJ, Doet al., 2016, Trends in adult body-mass index in 200 countries from 1975 to 2014: a pooled analysis of 1698 population-based measurement studies with 19.2 million participants, Lancet, Vol: 387, Pages: 1377-1396, ISSN: 1474-547X

BackgroundUnderweight and severe and morbid obesity are associated with highly elevated risks of adverse health outcomes. We estimated trends in mean body-mass index (BMI), which characterises its population distribution, and in the prevalences of a complete set of BMI categories for adults in all countries.MethodsWe analysed, with use of a consistent protocol, population-based studies that had measured height and weight in adults aged 18 years and older. We applied a Bayesian hierarchical model to these data to estimate trends from 1975 to 2014 in mean BMI and in the prevalences of BMI categories (<18·5 kg/m2 [underweight], 18·5 kg/m2 to <20 kg/m2, 20 kg/m2 to <25 kg/m2, 25 kg/m2 to <30 kg/m2, 30 kg/m2 to <35 kg/m2, 35 kg/m2 to <40 kg/m2, ≥40 kg/m2 [morbid obesity]), by sex in 200 countries and territories, organised in 21 regions. We calculated the posterior probability of meeting the target of halting by 2025 the rise in obesity at its 2010 levels, if post-2000 trends continue.FindingsWe used 1698 population-based data sources, with more than 19·2 million adult participants (9·9 million men and 9·3 million women) in 186 of 200 countries for which estimates were made. Global age-standardised mean BMI increased from 21·7 kg/m2 (95% credible interval 21·3–22·1) in 1975 to 24·2 kg/m2 (24·0–24·4) in 2014 in men, and from 22·1 kg/m2 (21·7–22·5) in 1975 to 24·4 kg/m2 (24·2–24·6) in 2014 in women. Regional mean BMIs in 2014 for men ranged from 21·4 kg/m2 in central Africa and south Asia to 29·2 kg/m2 (28·6–29·8) in Polynesia and Micronesia; for women the range was from 21·8 kg/m2 (21·4–22·3) in south Asia to 32·2 kg/m2 (31·5–32·8) in Polynesia and Micronesia. Over these four decades, age-standardised global prevalence of un

Journal article

Bentham J, Morris DL, Cunninghame Graham DS, Pinder CL, Tombleson P, Behrens TW, Martin J, Fairfax BP, Knight JC, Chen L, Replogle J, Syvanen A-C, Ronnblom L, Graham RR, Wither JE, Rioux JD, Alarcon-Riquelme ME, Vyse TJet al., 2015, Genetic association analyses implicate aberrant regulation of innate and adaptive immunity genes in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, Nature Genetics, Vol: 47, Pages: 1457-1464, ISSN: 1546-1718

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a genetically complex autoimmune disease characterized by loss of immune tolerance to nuclear and cell surface antigens. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) had modest sample sizes, reducing their scope and reliability. Our study comprised 7,219 cases and 15,991 controls of European ancestry, constituting a new GWAS, a meta-analysis with a published GWAS and a replication study. We have mapped 43 susceptibility loci, including ten new associations. Assisted by dense genome coverage, imputation provided evidence for missense variants underpinning associations in eight genes. Other likely causal genes were established by examining associated alleles for cis-acting eQTL effects in a range of ex vivo immune cells. We found an over-representation (n = 16) of transcription factors among SLE susceptibility genes. This finding supports the view that aberrantly regulated gene expression networks in multiple cell types in both the innate and adaptive immune response contribute to the risk of developing SLE.

Journal article

Ezzati M, Danaei G, Fahimi S, Lu Y, Zhou B, Hajifathalian K, Di Cesare M, Lo W, Reis-Santos B, Cowan MJ, Shaw JE, Bentham J, Lin JK, Bixby H, Magliano D, Bovet P, Miranda JJ, Khang Y, Stevens GA, Riley LM, Ali MKet al., 2015, Effects of diabetes definition on global surveillance of diabetes prevalence and diagnosis: a pooled analysis of 96 population-based studies with 331 288 participants, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Vol: 3, Pages: 624-637, ISSN: 2213-8587

Background: Over time, diabetes has been defined based on different biomarkers, includingfasting plasma glucose (FPG) or 2-hour plasma glucose in an oral glucose tolerance test (2hOGTT) and,more recently, haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). We examined the influence of diagnostic definitions on boththe population prevalence of diabetes and the classification of previously-undiagnosed individuals aswith vs. without diabetes in a pooled analysis of data from population-based health examinationsurveys in different world regions.

Journal article

Bentham J, Vyse TJ, 2013, The development of genome-wide association studies and their application to complex diseases, including lupus, LUPUS, Vol: 22, Pages: 1205-1213, ISSN: 0961-2033

Journal article

Bentham J, Hand DJ, 2012, Data mining from a patient safety database: the lessons learned, DATA MINING AND KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY, Vol: 24, Pages: 195-217, ISSN: 1384-5810

Journal article

Bentham J, Hand DJ, 2009, Detecting New Kinds of Patient Safety Incidents, 12th International Conference on Discovery Science, Publisher: SPRINGER-VERLAG BERLIN, Pages: 51-65, ISSN: 0302-9743

Conference paper

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Journal article

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