Imperial College London

DrJohannesHattula

Business School

Assistant Professor of Marketing
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7571j.hattula Website

 
 
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Location

 

389Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

11 results found

Herzog W, Hattula J, Dahl D, 2021, Marketers Project Their Personal Preferences onto Consumers: Overcoming the Threat of Egocentric Decision Making, Journal of Marketing Research, ISSN: 0022-2437

Journal article

Hattula J, Herzog W, Dhar R, 2018, When Touch Interfaces Boost Consumer Confidence: The Role of Instrumental Need for Touch, Advances in Consumer Research, ISSN: 0098-9258

Journal article

Hattula JD, Herzog W, Dhar R, 2016, When Multi-Touch Interfaces Facilitate Judgment Confidence: The Role of Instrumental Need for Touch, Society for Consumer Psychology

Conference paper

Schmidt, Martin, Hattula, Johannes, Schmitz, Christian, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2016, Marketing Department’s Influence and Information Dissemination Within in a Firm: Evidence for an Inverted U-Shaped Relationship, 16th Biennial World Marketing Congress, Publisher: Springer, Pages: 22-22, ISSN: 2363-6173

Conference paper

Hattula JD, Herzog W, Dhar R, 2015, When Multi-Touch Interfaces Facilitate Judgment Confidence: The Role of Instrumental Need for Touch, 0th Triennial Invitational Choice Symposium 2016

Conference paper

Hattula, Johannes D, Schmitz, Christian, Schmidt, Martin, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2015, Is more always better? An investigation into the relationship between marketing influence and managers’ market intelligence dissemination, accepted for publication, International Journal of Research in Marketing, Vol: 32, Pages: 179-186, ISSN: 0167-8116

How does the influence of the marketing department within an organization affect marketing managers' dissemination of market intelligence (i.e., knowledge about customer needs and competitor activities) to managers of other departments? Three studies with 711 executive managers and integrated survey and experimental data offer insights. Rather than the positive relationship indicated by conventional wisdom, the study results indicate a curvilinear, inverted U-shaped effect of marketing's influence on marketing managers' dissemination of market intelligence. Managers in a marketing department with moderate influence within the organization are significantly more likely to disseminate market intelligence than are those in low and, interestingly, those in high influence departments. This finding adds nuance to the existing body of knowledge showing countervailing effects of a strong marketing department and implies that executives need to carefully manage the organization's culture to ensure well-balanced influences of the marketing department in relation to other corporate functions.

Journal article

Hattula, Johannes D, Herzog, Walter, Dahl, Darren W, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2015, Managerial empathy facilitates egocentric predictions of consumer preferences, Journal of Marketing Research, Vol: 52, Pages: 235-252, ISSN: 1547-7193

Common wisdom suggests that managerial empathy (i.e., the mental process of taking a consumer perspective) helps executives separate their personal consumption preferences from those of consumers, thereby preventing egocentric preference predictions. The results of the present investigation, however, show exactly the opposite. First, the authors find that managerial empathy ironically accelerates self-reference in predictions of consumer preferences. Second, managers’ self-referential tendencies increase with empathy because taking a consumer perspective activates managers’ private consumer identity and, thus, their personal consumption preferences. Third, empathic managers’ self-referential preference predictions make them less likely to use market research results. Fourth, the findings imply that when explicitly instructed to do so, managers are capable of suppressing their private consumer identity in the process of perspective taking, which helps them reduce self-referential preference predictions. To support their conclusions, the authors present four empirical studies with 480 experienced marketing managers and show that incautiously taking the perspective of consumers causes self-referential decisions in four contexts: product development, communication management, pricing, and celebrity endorsement.

Journal article

Hattula, Johannes D, 2015, Interview: Putting Yourself in the Customer's Shoes Doesn't Work, Harvard Business Review, Vol: 93, Pages: 34-35, ISSN: 0017-8012

Journal article

Hattula, Johannes, Schmidt, Martin, Schmitz, Christian, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2013, How does Marketing Department’s Influence Affect the Dissemination of Market Intelligence across the Firm? Evidence for an Inverted U-Shaped Relationship, EMAC European Marketing Academy Conference, Istanbul, Turkey

Conference paper

Hattula, Johannes, Herzog, Walter, Dahl, Darren W, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2012, When Empathic Managers Become Consumers: A Self-Referential Bias, Association for Consumer Research North American Conference, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Conference paper

Hattula, Johannes, Herzog, Walter, Dahl, Darren W, Reinecke, Svenet al., 2011, When Empathic Managers Misunderstand Their Customers: Evidence for a Self-Referential Bias, INFORMS Marketing Science Conference, Boston, Massachusetts, USA

Conference paper

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