Imperial College London

Dr Jo Horsburgh

Central FacultyCentre for Higher Education Research and Scholarship

Principal Teaching Fellow in Medical Education
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8848j.horsburgh

 
 
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Location

 

S508Sherfield BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

19 results found

Murray OM, Chiu Y-LT, Wong B, Horsburgh Jet al., 2022, Deindividualising Imposter Syndrome: Imposter Work among Marginalised STEMM Undergraduates in the UK, SOCIOLOGY-THE JOURNAL OF THE BRITISH SOCIOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION, ISSN: 0038-0385

Journal article

Wong B, Chiu Y-LT, Murray ÓM, Horsburgh J, Copsey-Blake Met al., 2022, ‘Biology is easy, physics is hard’: Student perceptions of the ideal and the typical student across STEM higher education, International Studies in Sociology of Education, Pages: 1-22, ISSN: 0962-0214

This paper draws upon in-depth interviews with 89 students from two UK universities to explore how students from Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) degrees describe the ideal as well as the typical student in their respective disciplines. We provide a comparative insight into the similarities and differences between disciplinary identities based on student perceptions. More specifically, we consider how undergraduates from biology, engineering, mathematics and physics construct the ideal and the typical student in their degree, highlighting the popular discourses and desirable traits that appear to characterise students in these disciplines. In addition to a masculinised construction of students in engineering, mathematics and physics, we found a social hierarchy within STEM degrees where biology was perceived as the easier STEM subject. We conclude with a discussion of the impact of such hierarchies on student identities in STEM, and potential implications for equality, diversity and inclusion.

Journal article

Brown MEL, Lim JH, Horsburgh J, Pistoll C, Thakerar V, Maini A, Johnson C, Beaton L, Mahoney C, Kumar Set al., 2022, Identity Development in Disorientating Times: the Experiences of Medical Students During COVID-19, MEDICAL SCIENCE EDUCATOR, Vol: 32, Pages: 995-1004

Journal article

Wong B, Chiu Y-LT, Murray OM, Horsburgh Jet al., 2022, End of the road? The career intentions of under-represented STEM students in higher education, International Journal of STEM Education, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 2196-7822

BackgroundThe analogy of the leaky pipeline has been used to describe STEM education, with lower student diversity from compulsory to post-compulsory education and beyond. Although extensive research has explored the views and experiences of school-aged children about STEM, fewer studies have examined the career intentions of STEM students at university, especially those from under-represented backgrounds (e.g., racial/ethnic minority, women and working class students). This paper draws on a large qualitative study that interviewed 110 under-represented STEM undergraduates in the UK. We focus on students’ STEM career intentions and the likely directions of their post-degree trajectories, drawing on the lenses of science identity and Social Cognitive Career Theory.ResultsThree pathways were identified. The first group plans to pursue a career in or from STEM. While social inequalities may persist, the potential impact of these challenges may be neutralised by the personal drive and passion of STEM career-oriented students, who seem committed to drive into an STEM future. The second group stated intentions for non-STEM-related careers, leaving the STEM pipeline. The reasons students gave for their imminent departure from STEM are the better financial reward on offer in some non-STEM sectors, especially in finance and business, as well as wider social inequalities and stereotypes. The third group was undecided, those who are uncertain or unclear about their futures. Students described a general lack of direction or clear career pathway, from a complete lack of career ideas to an overload of options.ConclusionsWe conclude with a reminder that the STEM pipeline is far from secured or equitable, despite apparent progress in participation and representation. We reiterate the importance of fostering a diverse, inclusive and supportive learning environment that maximises the participation, strengths and potential of all students, especially those from under-represented

Journal article

Moula Z, Horsburgh J, Scott K, Durley T, Kumar Set al., 2022, The impact of Covid-19 on Professional Identity Formation: An international qualitative study of medical students’ reflective entries in a Global Creative Competition, BMC Medical Education, Vol: 22, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 1472-6920

Introduction: The Covid-19 pandemic, which affected medical students globally, could be viewed as a disorientating dilemma with the potential to offer opportunities for transformative learning. In 2021 the Medical Education Innovation and Research Centre at Imperial College London launched a Global Creative Competition as a platform for medical students to reflect on their experiences during the pandemic. Methods: 648 creative pieces with written reflections were submitted by medical students from 52 countries. 155 students from 28 countries consented for their entries to be included in this study. The reflections were analysed thematically and independently by three reviewers to explore how the pandemic impacted students’ professional identity formation (PIF).Results: The pandemic increased students’ awareness of the social and global role of doctors in addressing health inequities. Students felt part of a wider healthcare community and showed greater appreciation towards person-centred care. Students also became more aware of their personal needs, priorities, and the importance of self-care.Discussion: In agreement with Mezirow’s theory of transformative learning (2003), the pandemic led students to re-examine pre-existing epistemic and sociocultural assumptions concerning the role of doctors and explore new perspectives of what it means to be a doctor. In accordance with Cheng’s theory of coping flexibility (2021), students developed both emotion-focused coping strategies (e.g., arts engagement) and problem-solving strategies (e.g., volunteering), suggesting they were able to adjust psychologically and develop agency. However, students experienced tension between their sense of duty and sense of wellbeing, highlighting the need for medical educators to design into programmes formal support systems where medical students have the space and time they need to reflect on their emergent identities as a doctor.Conclusion: Medical educators shoul

Journal article

Gajria C, Gunning E, Horsburgh J, Kumar Set al., 2022, Using vlogging to facilitate medical student reflection, Education for Primary Care, Vol: 33, Pages: 244-247, ISSN: 1367-8523

Reflection is a critical skill for medical professionals, however medical students often find it difficult to grasp and engage with. During a special choice module on yoga and mindfulness, students practised mindfulness at home and posted their reflections on the activities in text and vlogs in a closed WhatsApp group. Semi-structured focus groups investigated student perspectives on the acceptability and impact of v-logging on their reflective practice. We thematically analysed transcripts of the WhatsApp conversations and two focus groups.Students felt v-logging was more engaging and convenient than written reflections. V-logging was found to enhance emotional content that is commonly lacking in written reflection, which is has importance as emotional recognition promotes a higher quality of reflection. Although some students were concerned about their appearance in videos, they appeared to overcome this, finding v-logging facilitated deeper reflection compared with traditional written reflections due to accessibility and ease of expression. Furthermore, there was additional learning through watching other students’ emotive vlogs which fits with the phenomenon of reflective vicarious learning.Sharing vlogs within a WhatsApp group appeared to be an accessible way for facilitating greater engagement with affective and expressive aspects of reflection.

Journal article

Dutta N, Scott K, Horsburgh J, Jamil F, Chandauka R, Meiring SJ, Kumar Set al., 2022, WATCCH: a multiprofessional approach to widening participation in healthcare careers., Educ Prim Care, Vol: 33, Pages: 102-108

BACKGROUND: Students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are underrepresented in higher education and healthcare careers. Whilst most healthcare-related widening participation schemes focus on one healthcare profession, the Widening Access to Careers in Community Healthcare (WATCCH) programme at Imperial College London supports participation in a range of community healthcare careers. We aim to evaluate the impact of WATCCH on students' perceptions and aspirations towards community healthcare careers. METHOD: WATCCH provides educational and application support to 16-18 year-old students interested in a variety of community healthcare careers via work experience, educational workshops and mentoring. The programme was evaluated by focus groups using semi-structured questions to explore the impact of WATCCH on students' healthcare career perceptions and aspirations. RESULTS: Five themes were identified from the focus groups: increased awareness and understanding of a range of community healthcare careers; improved insight into the realities of healthcare careers enabling reflection on career aspirations; altered perceptions of healthcare professionals and acquisition of new role models; increased confidence in achieving a career in healthcare; and valued access to previously inaccessible work experience. DISCUSSION: WATCCH is a multi-professional widening participation programme that has supported students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds interested in entering healthcare careers by increasing insights into varied healthcare careers, provision of role models, and increasing students' confidence of ability to enter healthcare careers. Similar programmes in other institutions could support large numbers of aspiring students to enter varied community healthcare careers in the future.

Journal article

Fyfe M, Horsburgh J, Blitz J, Chiavaroli N, Kumar S, Cleland Jet al., 2021, The do's, don'ts and don't knows of redressing differential attainment related to race/ethnicity in medical schools, PERSPECTIVES ON MEDICAL EDUCATION, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 2212-2761

Journal article

Brown MEL, Horsburgh J, 2021, I and thou: Challenging the barriers to adopting a relational approach to medical education, MEDICAL EDUCATION, Vol: 56, Pages: 14-16, ISSN: 0308-0110

Journal article

Dutta N, Scott K, Horsburgh J, Jamil F, Chandauka R, Meiring SJ, Kumar Set al., 2021, WATCCH: a multiprofessional approach to widening participation in healthcare careers, Education for Primary Care, ISSN: 1367-8523

BackgroundStudents from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are underrepresented in higher education and healthcare careers. Whilst most healthcare-related widening participation schemes focus on one healthcare profession, the Widening Access to Careers in Community Healthcare (WATCCH) programme at Imperial College London supports participation in a range of community healthcare careers. We aim to evaluate the impact of WATCCH on students’ perceptions and aspirations towards community healthcare careers.MethodWATCCH provides educational and application support to 16–18 year-old students interested in a variety of community healthcare careers via work experience, educational workshops and mentoring. The programme was evaluated by focus groups using semi-structured questions to explore the impact of WATCCH on students’ healthcare career perceptions and aspirations.ResultsFive themes were identified from the focus groups: increased awareness and understanding of a range of community healthcare careers; improved insight into the realities of healthcare careers enabling reflection on career aspirations; altered perceptions of healthcare professionals and acquisition of new role models; increased confidence in achieving a career in healthcare; and valued access to previously inaccessible work experience.DiscussionWATCCH is a multi-professional widening participation programme that has supported students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds interested in entering healthcare careers by increasing insights into varied healthcare careers, provision of role models, and increasing students’ confidence of ability to enter healthcare careers. Similar programmes in other institutions could support large numbers of aspiring students to enter varied community healthcare careers in the future.

Journal article

van Lankveld T, Thampy H, Cantillon P, Horsburgh J, Kluijtmans Met al., 2020, Supporting a teacher identity in health professions education: AMEE Guide No. 132, MEDICAL TEACHER, Vol: 43, Pages: 124-136, ISSN: 0142-159X

Journal article

Fyfe MV, Maini A, Horsburgh J, Golding Bet al., 2020, Racism in medical school Widening participation: moving from diversity to inclusion, BMJ: British Medical Journal, Vol: 368, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 0959-535X

Journal article

Craddock P, Maini A, Horsburgh J, Kumar Set al., 2019, Lifetimes of the clinical consultation: the current situation of healthcare consultations, BRITISH JOURNAL OF GENERAL PRACTICE, Vol: 69, Pages: 506-507, ISSN: 0960-1643

Journal article

Hall C, Peleva E, Vithlani RH, Shah S, Bashyam M, Ramadas M, Horsburgh J, Sam AHet al., 2019, FEEDBK: a novel approach for providing feedback., Clin Teach

BACKGROUND: High-quality feedback is fundamental to students' learning. We describe and evaluate FEEDBK, a novel feedback tool that encompasses the focus of learning, student self-evaluation (reflection), the encounter with the patient (professionalism), one task that the student should continue to do (reinforcement), one task that they could do better (improvement) and a key take-home message for self-directed learning. METHODS: Medical students received regular bedside teaching and feedback during a 9-week clinical placement at a teaching hospital. Teaching fellows gave feedback in their usual style during weeks 1-3 and then used the FEEDBK tool during weeks 4-9. Questionnaires and focus groups were used to evaluate the students' experience of feedback before and after the introduction of FEEDBK. RESULTS: FEEDBK significantly enhanced the feedback experience across six domains: identifying learning objectives, chance to reflect, feedback on communication skills/professionalism, specific suggestions for improvement, clear take-home message and personalised feedback. The analysis of the feedback from focus groups yielded four categories: (i) FEEDBK influenced the feedback process (delivering timely feedback); (ii) the nature of the feedback (enhancing both the quantity and the quality of the feedback received); (iii) the structure of the feedback; and (iv) the evolution of teaching and learning. DISCUSSION: FEEDBK may enhance both the quantity and the quality of feedback and has the potential to improve the quality of teaching. It provides teachers with a quick and easy-to-follow framework to signpost curriculum-aligned feedback.

Journal article

Cuming T, Horsburgh J, 2019, Constructing Surgical Identities: Becoming a Surgeon Educator, Advancing Surgical Education, Publisher: Springer Singapore, Pages: 133-140, ISBN: 9789811331275

Book chapter

Beckwith H, Kingsbury M, Horsburgh J, 2018, Why do people choose nephrology? Identifying positive motivators to aid recruitment and retention, Clinical Kidney Journal, Vol: 11, Pages: 599-604, ISSN: 2048-8505

Increasing concerns about recruitment and retention of junior doctors have led to renewed interest in how and when trainees choose their specialties. To our knowledge, no study has yet reported what attracts UK applicants to nephrology nor how clinicians develop vocational interests or make occupational choices. With this in mind, we sought to explore the motivation behind current nephrologist's career choices in the UK. We interviewed 11 nephrologists using a semi-structured face-to-face approach and used interpretative phenomenological analysis to conduct and analyse the interviews. We found role models were pivotal in encouraging specialization in nephrology, particularly those encountered in early postgraduate training. The diversity, diagnostic challenge and cross-specialty knowledge was highlighted as well as the ability to 'make a difference to patients' lives'. Nephrologists enjoyed the challenge of managing very sick, acutely unwell patients as well as the holistic continuity of long-term care offered to dialysis patients and their families. Academic and procedural components were attractive motivators to the specialty and the flexibility to have multiple interests was noted, with many nephrologists having 'portfolio' careers. Based on these results, we suggest strategies the specialty can use to aid policy decision making, promote recruitment and improve educational experiences within current training programmes.

Journal article

Horsburgh JL, Ippolito K, 2018, A skill to be worked at: Using social learning theory to explore the process of learning from role models in clinical settings, BMC Medical Education, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1472-6920

Background:Role modelling is widely accepted as being a highly influential teaching and learning method in medical education but little attention is given to understanding how students learn from role models. This study focuses on role modelling as an active, dynamic process, involving observational learning and aims to explore the process involved, including strategies that learners and medical teachers use to support this. Methods:To gain insight into medical students’ and clinical teachers’ understanding of learning through role modelling, a qualitative, interpretative methodology was adopted, using one-to-one semi-structured interviews. Six final year medical students and five clinical teachers were purposefully sampled and interviewed. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. The data were then analysed using open and axial coding before codes were combined to develop broader themes. Results:Students could identify ways in which they learnt from role models but acknowledged that this was complex and haphazard. They described selectively and consciously paying attention, using retention strategies, reproducing observed behaviour and being motivated to imitate. Students evidenced the powerful impact of direct and vicarious reinforcement. Clinical teachers reported using strategies to help students learn, but these were not always consciously or consistently applied or informed by teachers’ understanding of their students’ cognitive processing. ConclusionFindings illustrate in what ways the process of learning from role models in clinical settings is challenging. They also support the relevancy and usefulness of Bandura’s four stage social learning model for understanding this process and informing recommendations to make learning from role modelling more systematic and effective.

Journal article

Ippolito K, Horsburgh J, 2017, On the job learning in clinical settings, Informal Learning Perspectives, Challenges and Opportunities, ISBN: 9781536122503

This book would be of interest to educators and managers alike, and aims to highlight that informal learning occurs all around us, and if we recognise it and its impact, then we can enhance our potential as lifelong learners and make work ...

Book chapter

Moula Z, Horsburgh J, Scott K, Durley T, Kumar Set al., The impact of Covid-19 on Professional Identity Formation: An international qualitative study of medical students’ reflective entries in a Global Creative Competition

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title> <jats:p>Introduction: The Covid-19 pandemic, which affected medical students globally, could be viewed as a disorientating dilemma with the potential to offer opportunities for transformative learning. In 2021 the Medical Education Innovation and Research Centre at Imperial College London launched a Global Creative Competition as a platform for medical students to reflect on their experiences during the pandemic. Methods: 648 creative pieces with written reflections were submitted by medical students from 52 countries. 155 students from 28 countries consented for their entries to be included in this study. The reflections were analysed thematically and independently by three reviewers to explore how the pandemic impacted students’ professional identity formation (PIF).Results: The pandemic increased students’ awareness of the social and global role of doctors in addressing health inequities. Students felt part of a wider healthcare community and showed greater appreciation towards person-centred care. Students also became more aware of their personal needs, priorities, and the importance of self-care.Discussion: In agreement with Mezirow’s theory of transformative learning (2003), the pandemic led students to re-examine pre-existing epistemic and sociocultural assumptions concerning the role of doctors and explore new perspectives of what it means to be a doctor. In accordance with Cheng’s theory of coping flexibility (2021), students developed both emotion-focused coping strategies (e.g., arts engagement) and problem-solving strategies (e.g., volunteering), suggesting they were able to adjust psychologically and develop agency. However, students experienced tension between their sense of duty and sense of wellbeing, highlighting the need for medical educators to facilitate PIF by supporting students with conflicting emotions.Conclusion: Medical educators should encourage students to

Journal article

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