Imperial College London

DrJonathanPearson-Stuttard

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Clinical Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

j.pearson-stuttard

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

11 results found

Ezzati M, Pearson-Stuttard J, Bennett J, Mathers CDet al., Acting on non-communicable diseases in low- and middle-income tropical countries, Nature, ISSN: 0028-0836

The classical portrayal of poor health in tropical countries is one of infections and parasites, contrasting with wealthy western countries, where unhealthy diet and behaviours cause non-communicable diseases (NCDs) like heart disease and cancer. Using international mortality data, we show that most NCDs cause more deaths at any age in low- and middle-income tropical countries than in high-income western countries. Causes of NCDs in low- and middle-income countries include poor nutrition and living environment, infections, insufficient regulation of tobacco and alcohol, and under-resourced and inaccessible healthcare. We identify a comprehensive set of actions across health, social, economic and environmental sectors that can confront NCDs in low- and middle-income tropical countries and reduce global health inequalities.

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Zhou B, Kontis V, Bentham J, Gunter MJ, Ezzati Met al., 2018, Worldwide burden of cancer attributable to diabetes and high body-mass index: a comparative risk assessment, LANCET DIABETES & ENDOCRINOLOGY, Vol: 6, Pages: E6-E15, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

d'Arcy JL, Coffey S, Loudon MA, Kennedy A, Pearson-Stuttard J, Birks J, Frangou E, Farmer AJ, Mant D, Wilson J, Myerson SG, Prendergast BDet al., 2016, Large-scale community echocardiographic screening reveals a major burden of undiagnosed valvular heart disease in older people: the OxVALVE Population Cohort Study, European Heart Journal, Vol: 37, Pages: 3515-3522, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Hooton W, Critchley J, Capewell S, Collins M, Mason H, Guzman-Castillo M, O'Flaherty Met al., Cost-effectiveness analysis of eliminating industrial and all trans fats in England and Wales: modelling study, Journal of Public Health, ISSN: 1741-3842

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Blundell S, Harris T, Cook DG, Critchley Jet al., 2016, Diabetes and infection: assessing the association with glycaemic control in population-based studies, The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology, Vol: 4, Pages: 148-158, ISSN: 2213-8587

Journal article

Afshin A, Penalvo J, Del Gobbo L, Kashaf M, Micha R, Morrish K, Pearson-Stuttard J, Rehm C, Shangguan S, Smith JD, Mozaffarian Det al., 2015, CVD Prevention Through Policy: a Review of Mass Media, Food/Menu Labeling, Taxation/Subsidies, Built Environment, School Procurement, Worksite Wellness, and Marketing Standards to Improve Diet, Current Cardiology Reports, Vol: 17, ISSN: 1523-3782

Journal article

Allen K, Pearson-Stuttard J, Hooton W, Diggle P, Capewell S, OFlaherty Met al., Potential of trans fats policies to reduce socioeconomic inequalities in mortality from coronary heart disease in England: cost effectiveness modelling study, BMJ, Pages: h4583-h4583

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Critchley J, Capewell S, OFlaherty Met al., 2015, Quantifying the socio-economic benefits of reducing industrial dietary trans fats: modelling study, PLoS One, Vol: 10, Pages: e0132524-e0132524, ISSN: 1932-6203

Background:Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) remains a leading cause of UK mortality, generating a large and unequal burden of disease. Dietary trans fatty acids (TFA) represent a powerful CHD risk factor, yet to be addressed in the UK (approximately 1% daily energy) as successfully as in other nations. Potential outcomes of such measures, including effects upon health inequalities, have not been well quantified. We modelled the potential effects of specific reductions in TFA intake on CHD mortality, CHD related admissions, and effects upon socioeconomic inequalities.Methods & Results:We extended the previously validated IMPACTsec model, to estimate the potential effects of reductions (0.5% & 1% reductions in daily energy) in TFA intake in England and Wales, stratified by age, sex and socioeconomic circumstances. We estimated reductions in expected CHD deaths in 2030 attributable to these two specific reductions. Output measures were deaths prevented or postponed, life years gained and hospital admissions. A 1% reduction in TFA intake energy intake would generate approximately 3,900 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3,300–4,500) fewer deaths, 10,000 (8,800–10,300) (7% total) fewer hospital admissions and 37,000 (30,100–44,700) life years gained. This would also reduce health inequalities, preventing five times as many deaths and gaining six times as many life years in the most deprived quintile compared with the most affluent. A more modest reduction (0.5%) would still yield substantial health gains.Conclusions:Reducing intake of industrial TFA could substantially decrease CHD mortality and hospital admissions, and gain tens of thousands of life years. Crucially, this policy could also reduce health inequalities. UK strategies should therefore aim to minimise industrial TFA intake.

Journal article

Spiers L, Singh Mohal J, Pearson-Stuttard J, Greenlee H, Carmichael J, Busher Ret al., 2015, Recognition of the deteriorating patient, BMJ Quality Improvement Reports, Vol: 4, Pages: u206777.w2734-u206777.w2734

Journal article

Pearson-Stuttard J, Bajekal M, Scholes S, O'Flaherty M, Hawkins NM, Raine R, Capewell Set al., 2012, Recent UK trends in the unequal burden of coronary heart disease, Heart, Vol: 98, Pages: 1573-1582, ISSN: 1355-6037

Journal article

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