Imperial College London

DrJonathanPinto

Business School

Associate Professor Organizational Behaviour & Negotiation
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8543j.pinto

 
 
//

Location

 

282Business School BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

15 results found

Pinto J, sharma P, lee C-C, chung T-Tet al., 2021, National culture and occupational fraud magnitude: The moderating role of fraud type, Journal of Forensic Accounting Research

Journal article

Cruz KS, Pinto J, 2019, Team focus in focus: its implications for real teams and their members, Journal of Work and Organizational Psychology-Revista de Psicologia del Trabajo y de las Organizaciones, Vol: 35, Pages: 123-133, ISSN: 1576-5962

We develop and test a cross-level model of team focus on positive and negative discretionary team member behaviors. Using data collected from 405 team members across 76 teams and 15 organizations, we find that team focus is positively associated with interpersonal and organizational citizenship behaviors, and negatively associated with interpersonal deviance. We also find that team focus is positively associated with team members’ level of action identification. Exploratory analyses suggest that team members’ level of action identification might mediate the relationships between team focus, organizational citizenship, interpersonal deviance, and organizational deviance, respectively. We also find that real teams do not distinguish between outcome and process focus like lab and student teams do. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed.

Journal article

Pinto J, Bui HTM, Srivastava A, 2019, Sexualization of the work environment and emotional exhaustion: The case of India, International Journal of Manpower, Vol: 40, Pages: 558-573, ISSN: 0143-7720

Purpose – This study explores the relationship between sexualization of the work environment and emotional exhaustion, and develops some key antecedents of sexualization of the work environment. It was conducted in an emerging society, India, with high rate of crime against women, particularly related to sexual harassment and sexual assault.Design/methodology/approach - To test hypotheses, structural equation modelling was performed. The hypotheses were tested with data from 1101 white collar workers in India in three ways. Findings - Contact with other gender and flexible work arrangements were positively associated with sexualization of the work environment; and sexualization of the work environment waspositively associated with emotional exhaustion. In addition, sexualization of the work environment mediated the relationship between the two antecedent variables and emotional exhaustion.Research limitations/implications - There is a possible bias arising from the use of cross-sectional data. However, a number of methods were implemented to minimize it, including survey design and data analysis.Practical implications - The study offers some important suggestions for workplaces with a greater proportion of young male employees, particularly in a societal context like India.Originality/value –The paper provides evidence of the negative impact of sexualization of the work environment, and thereby contributes to current understanding of the “dark side” of behavior at work that might have significant impact on society.

Journal article

Nekovee M, Pinto J, 2019, Modeling the impact of organization structure and whistle-blowers on intra-organizational corruption contagion, Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and its Applications, Vol: 522, Pages: 339-349, ISSN: 0378-4371

We complement the rich conceptual work on organizational corruption by quantitatively modeling the spread of corruption within organizations. We systematically vary four organizational culture-related parameters, i.e., organization structure, location of bad apples, employees’ propensity to become corrupted (“corruption probability”), and number of whistle-blowers. Our simulation studies find that in organizations with flatter structures, corruption permeates the organization at a lower threshold value of corruption probability compared to those with taller structures. However, the final proportion of corrupted individuals is higher in the latter as compared to the former. Also, we find that for a 1,000-strong organization, 5% of the workforce is a critical threshold in terms of the number of whistle-blowers needed to constrain the spread of corruption, and if this number is around 25%, the corruption contagion is negligible. Implications of our results are discussed.

Journal article

Pinto J, 2019, Key to effective organizational performance management lies at the intersection of paradox theory and stakeholder theory, International Journal of Management Reviews, Vol: 21, Pages: 185-208, ISSN: 1460-8545

One of the fundamental and recurring issues in performance management is the adoption of a simplistic, short-term, narrow, metrics-oriented approach, which often results in unintended negative outcomes, some of which could be disastrous. This paper makes the case that the key to preventing this syndrome lies at the intersection of paradox and stakeholder theories. Both theories encourage a more complex, long-term, holistic, balanced approach to management. Stakeholder theory focuses on addressing the many (sometimes conflicting) goals of multiple stakeholders, and paradox theory provides insights into how this challenging task (i.e. of simultaneously addressing multiple conflicting priorities) can be accomplished. Thus, the former provides the ?what? and the latter the ?how? of effective organizational performance management. Accordingly, the literature at the intersection of both theories (composed of 69 scholarly outputs), was reviewed, and in so doing, identified seven domain areas and 21 constructs, all of which implicitly deal with either performance management or its communication, thereby lending support to this paper's thesis. The implications of this review for both theory and practice, including the role of paradoxical cognitive mechanisms, is discussed.

Journal article

Radicic D, Pinto J, 2019, Collaboration with external organizations and technological innovations: Evidence from Spanish manufacturing firms, Sustainability, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2071-1050

Based on the two knowledge dimensions of availability and accessibility, this study investigates the influence of cooperation with external organizations on technological, product, and process innovations. Using longitudinal data from Spanish manufacturing firms, we estimate dynamic random-effects probit models and thus take into account that technological innovations exhibit persistent behavior. We find that cooperation with suppliers and universities is positively associated with both product and process innovations. However, sectoral analysis according to technological intensity reveals that cooperation with suppliers increases the propensity to technological innovation in industries with a higher degree of technological intensity, while cooperation with universities increases the likelihood of innovation in industries with a lower degree of technological intensity. Moreover, empirical results indicate a high degree of true or genuine state dependence in both types of innovations. Based on these findings, we discuss the theoretical, managerial, and policy implications of the study.

Journal article

Pinto J, 2017, A multifocal framework for developing intentionally sustainable organizations, Current Opinion in Environmental Sustainability, Vol: 28, Pages: 17-23, ISSN: 1877-3443

This paper briefly reviews recent interesting work in the field of sustainable organizations research, encompassing domains such as institutional theory, resource-based view, stakeholder theory, framing, and paradox theory. Drawing on these it develops a Multifocal framework for developing Intentionally Sustainable Organizations (ISO), which, inter alia, incorporates and applies new concepts such as balanced bifocal stakeholder management and paradox approach to organization design to this field. It makes the case that the Icehotel in Jukkasjarvi, Sweden, is an ISO and presents evidence that it manifests all aspects of the theorizing in this paper.

Journal article

Pinto J, 2017, Viewing team selection through a temporal lens, Organizational Psychology Review, Vol: 7, Pages: 171-194, ISSN: 2041-3874

This paper builds synthesized coherence (Locke & Golden-Biddle, 1997) across disciplines such as organizational behavior, personnel psychology, entrepreneurship, project management, and strategic management by developing a temporal team selection framework that delineates three temporal team selection processes (i.e., simultaneous selection, sequential selection, and substitution selection). Of these three processes, sequential selection, which could either be constraint-driven or coevolution-driven, is a new conceptualization. This framework speaks to the broader research stream on membership dynamics, and therefore its key constructs such as arithmetic of membership change (Arrow & McGrath, 1993) and temporal patterning of membership change (Arrow & McGrath, 1993), have been systematically applied to the temporal team selection processes. Finally, the implications of this theorizing for both research and practice are discussed.

Journal article

Pinto J, 2016, “Wow! That's so cool!” The Icehotel as organizational trope, Human Relations, Vol: 69, Pages: 891-914, ISSN: 1741-282X

This article introduces the Icehotel, the world’s first and largest hotel to be constructed entirely of ice and snow, as a unique and generative organizational trope. As a trope (and metaphor, in particular), it both supplements and complements Morgan’s seminal book, The Images of Organization, and generates unique insights with regard to surprise, unifinality, purity, eco-coreness and rebirth. The Icehotel also serves as a lens for examining organizations through each master trope, that is, metaphor, metonymy, synecdoche and irony. Evidence of metonymy in language describing the Icehotel is presented. The case for synecdoche is made by arguing that the Icehotel is a species of two genera, that is, temporary organizations and paradoxical organizations. Also, the Icehotel is not only paradoxical (i.e. a form of irony), but also generates four other paradoxes, namely, the ways that organizations are evolutionary yet revolutionary, negative as well as positive, different yet similar and unsustainably sustainable. The Icehotel also exemplifies serious play – a particular approach for managing paradoxes. Finally, the article discusses implications for research and practice.

Journal article

Pinto J, 2014, Entrepreneurs' Cognitive Biases and Heuristics in Entrepreneurial Team Recruitment., Academy of Management Proceedings, Vol: 2014

The bulk of the cognition-related research has largely focused on the first step of venturecreation, i.e., opportunity recognition (Ozgen & Baron, 2007). This paper focuses on asubsequent step, i.e., recruitment of the entrepreneurial team. The entrepreneurial team is core toany new venture (Cooper & Daily, 1997) and a venture’s success is influenced by the team thatan entrepreneur has been able to put together to exploit an opportunity (Cooper & Bruno, 1977;Zacharakis & Meyer, 1998). Thus, the composition of new venture teams is a highly relevant andinteresting question (Ruef, Aldrich, & Carter, 2003) and is the subject of this paper.What role cognitive biases, errors and heuristics play in the thinking of entrepreneurs isone of the questions that entrepreneurship scholars have attempted to address (e.g., Alvarez &Busenitz, 2001; Busenitz & Barney, 1997). Cognitive biases and heuristics are mental shortcutsand simplifying strategies used to make judgments and take decisions under uncertain conditions(Bazerman, 1998; Busenitz & Lau, 1996; Simon, Houghton, & Aquino, 2000). Research findsthat entrepreneurs may be more prone to some biases and heuristics than non-entrepreneurs(Baron, 1998) due to either dispositions (e.g., Markman & Baron, 2003) or the entrepreneurialcontext (Duhaime & Schwenk, 1985; Hansen & Allen, 1992) or both (Forbes, 2005).

Journal article

Pinto J, 2013, Expanding the Content Domain of Workplace Aggression: A Three-level Aggressor-target Taxonomy, International Journal of Management Reviews, Vol: n/a, ISSN: 1460-8545

Journal article

Stein M, Pinto J, 2011, The Dark Side of Groups: A "Gang at Work" in Enron, GROUP & ORGANIZATION MANAGEMENT, Vol: 36, Pages: 692-721, ISSN: 1059-6011

Journal article

Pinto J, Stacey P, 2010, What’s in a name? Just the essence of one’s professional identity, Industrial and Organizational Psychololgy: Perspectives on Science and Practice, Vol: 3

Journal article

Beenen G, Pinto J, Watkins S, 2009, Resisting Organizational-Level Corruption: An Interview With Sherron Watkins, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT LEARNING & EDUCATION, Vol: 8, Pages: 275-289, ISSN: 1537-260X

Journal article

Pinto J, Leana CR, Pil FK, 2008, Corrupt organizations or organizations of corrupt individuals? Two types of organization-level corruption, ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT REVIEW, Vol: 33, Pages: 685-709, ISSN: 0363-7425

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00574334&limit=30&person=true