Imperial College London

MrJamesPotts

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Statistician/Data Manager
 
 
 
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+44 (0)20 7594 7953j.potts

 
 
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Location

 

G61Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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95 results found

Pan H, Fuertes E, Potts J, Casas L, Nowak D, Heinrich J, Garcia-Aymerich J, Urrutia I, Martinez-Moratalla J, Gullón J-A, Pereira-Vega A, Raherison C, Chanoine S, Demoly P, Leynaert B, Gislason T, Probst N, Abramson MJ, Jõgi R, Norbäck D, Sigsgaard T, Olivieri M, Svanes C, Jarvis Det al., 2024, Gas cooking indoors and respiratory symptoms in the ECRHS cohort, International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health, Vol: 256, ISSN: 1092-5732

Background:Gas cooking is an important source of indoor air pollutants, and there is some limited evidence that it might adversely be associated with respiratory health. Using repeated cross-sectional data from the multi-centre international European Community Respiratory Health Survey, we assessed whether adults using gas cookers have increased risk of respiratory symptoms compared to those using electric cookers and tested whether there was effect modification by a priori selected factors.Methods:Data on respiratory symptoms and gas cooking were collected from participants at 26–55 and 38–67 years (median time between examinations 11.4 years) from interviewer-led questionnaires. Repeated associations between gas cooking (versus electric) and respiratory symptoms were estimated using multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression models adjusted for age, sex, study arm, smoking status, education level, and included random intercepts for participants within study centres. Analyses were repeated using a 3-level variable for type of cooker and gas source. Effect modification by ventilation habits, cooking duration, sex, age atopy, asthma, and study arm were examined.Results:The sample included 4337 adults (43.7% males) from 19 centres in 9 countries. Gas cooking increased the risk of “shortness of breath whilst at rest” (OR = 1.38; 95%CI: 1.06–1.79) and “wheeze with breathlessness” (1.32; 1.00–1.74). For several other symptoms, effect estimates were larger in those who used both gas hobs and ovens, had a bottled gas source and cooked for over 60 min per day. Stratifying results by sex and age found stronger associations in females and younger adults.Conclusion:This multi-centre international study, using repeat data, suggested using gas cookers in the home was more strongly associated than electric cookers with certain respiratory symptoms in adults. As gas cooking is common, these results may play an important role in

Journal article

Nafees AA, Allana A, Kadir MM, Potts J, Minelli C, Semple S, De Matteis S, Burney P, Cullinan Pet al., 2024, A cluster randomised controlled trial to reduce respiratory effects of cotton dust exposure among textile workers: the MultiTex RCT study., Eur Respir J, Vol: 63

BACKGROUND: We determined the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce cotton dust-related respiratory symptoms and improve lung function of textile workers. METHODS: We undertook a cluster randomised controlled trial at 38 textile mills in Karachi, Pakistan. The intervention comprised: training in occupational health for workers and managers, formation of workplace committees to promote a health and safety plan that included wet mopping and safe disposal of cotton dust, provision of simple face masks, and further publicity about the risks from cotton dust. Participating mills were randomised following baseline data collection. The impact of the intervention was measured through surveys at 3, 12 and 18 months using questionnaires, spirometry and dust measurements. The primary outcomes were 1) changes in prevalence of a composite respiratory symptom variable, 2) changes in post-bronchodilator percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and 3) changes in cotton dust levels. These were assessed using two-level mixed effects linear and logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 2031 participants recruited at baseline, 807 (40%) were available at the third follow-up. At that point, workers in the intervention arm were more likely to report an improvement in respiratory symptoms (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.06-2.36) and lung function (FEV1 % pred: β 1.31%, 95% CI 0.04-2.57%). Personal dust levels decreased, more so in intervention mills, although we did not observe this in adjusted models due to the small number of samples. CONCLUSION: We found the intervention to be effective in improving the respiratory health of textile workers and recommend scaling-up of such simple and feasible interventions in low- and middle-income countries.

Journal article

Accordini S, Lando V, Calciano L, Bombieri C, Malerba G, Margagliotti A, Minelli C, Potts J, van der Plaat DA, Olivieri Met al., 2024, SNPs in FAM13A and IL2RB genes are associated with FeNO in adult subjects with asthma, Journal of Breath Research: volatiles for medical diagnosis, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1752-7155

Nitric oxide has different roles in asthma as both an endogenous modulator of airway function and a pro-inflammatory mediator. Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) is a reliable, quantitative, non-invasive, simple, and safe biomarker for assessing airways inflammation in asthma. Previous genome-wide and genetic association studies have shown that different genes and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are linked to FeNO. We aimed at identifying SNPs in candidate genes or gene regions that are associated with FeNO in asthma. We evaluated 264 asthma cases (median age 42.8 years, female 47.7%) who had been identified in the general adult population within the Gene Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases survey in Verona (Italy; 2008–2010). Two hundred and twenty-one tag-SNPs, which are representative of 50 candidate genes, were genotyped by a custom GoldenGate Genotyping Assay. A two-step association analysis was performed without assuming an a priori genetic model: step (1) a machine learning technique [gradient boosting machine (GBM)] was used to select the 15 SNPs with the highest variable importance measure; step (2) the GBM-selected SNPs were jointly tested in a linear regression model with natural log-transformed FeNO as the normally distributed outcome and with age, sex, and the SNPs as covariates. We replicated our results within an independent sample of 296 patients from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey III. We found that SNP rs987314 in family with sequence similarity 13 member A (FAM13A) and SNP rs3218258 in interleukin 2 receptor subunit beta (IL2RB) gene regions are significantly associated with FeNO in adult subjects with asthma. These genes are involved in different mechanisms that affect smooth muscle constriction and endothelial barrier function responses (FAM13A), or in immune response processes (IL2RB). Our findings contribute to the current knowledge on FeNO in asthma by identifying two novel SNPs associated with

Journal article

Amaral A, Potts J, Knox-Brown B, Bagkeris E, Harrabi I, Cherkaski HH, Agarwal D, Juvekar S, Padukudru Anand M, Gislason T, Nafees AA, Mortimer K, Janson C, Loh LC, Paraguas SN, Denguezli M, Al Ghobain M, Mannino D, Njoroge M, Devereux G, Seemungal T, Barbara C, Kocabas A, Ahmed R, Aquart-Stewart A, Studnicka M, Welte T, Tan WT, van Zyl-Smit RN, Koul P, Garcia Larsen V, Minelli C, Buist AS, Burney Pet al., 2023, Cohort profile: Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study, International Journal of Epidemiology, Vol: 52, Pages: e364-e373, ISSN: 0300-5771

Journal article

Knox-Brown B, Potts J, Quintero Santofimio V, Minelli C, Patel J, Abass N, Agarwal D, Ahmed R, Anand M, BS J, Denguezli M, Franssen F, Gislason T, Janson C, Juvekar S, Koul P, Malinovschi A, Nafees A, Nielsen R, Paraguas S, Buist AS, Burney P, Amaral Aet al., 2023, Isolated small airways obstruction predicts future chronic airflow obstruction: A multinational longitudinal study, BMJ Open Respiratory Research, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2052-4439

Background Chronic airflow obstruction is a key characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We investigated whether isolated small airways obstruction is associated with chronic airflow obstruction later in life.Methods We used longitudinal data from 3957 participants of the multinational Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study. We defined isolated small airways obstruction using the prebronchodilator mean forced expiratory flow rate between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FVC) (FEF25–75) if a result was less than the lower limit of normal (<LLN) in the presence of a normal forced expiratory volume in 1 s to FVC ratio (FEV1/FVC). We also used the forced expiratory volume in 3 s to FVC ratio (FEV3/FVC) to define small airways obstruction. We defined chronic airflow obstruction as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC<LLN. We performed mixed effects regression analyses to model the association between baseline isolated small airways obstruction and chronic airflow obstruction at follow-up. We assessed discriminative and predictive ability by calculating the area under the receiver operating curve (AUC) and Brier score. We replicated our analyses in 26 512 participants of the UK Biobank study.Results Median follow-up time was 8.3 years. Chronic airflow obstruction was more likely to develop in participants with isolated small airways obstruction at baseline (FEF25-75 less than the LLN, OR: 2.95, 95% CI 1.02 to 8.54; FEV3/FVC less than the LLN, OR: 1.94, 95% CI 1.05 to 3.62). FEF25-75 was better than the FEV3/FVC ratio to discriminate future chronic airflow obstruction (AUC: 0.764 vs 0.692). Results were similar among participants of the UK Biobank study.Conclusion Measurements of small airways obstruction can be used as early markers of future obstructive lung disease.

Journal article

Zhao T, Markevych I, Fuertes E, de Hoogh K, Accordini S, Boudier A, Casas L, Forsberg B, Garcia Aymerich J, Gnesi M, Holm M, Janson C, Jarvis D, Johannessen A, Jörres RA, Karrasch S, Leynaert B, Maldonado Perez JA, Malinovschi A, Martínez-Moratalla J, Modig L, Nowak D, Potts J, Probst-Hensch N, Sánchez-Ramos JL, Siroux V, Urrutia Landa I, Vienneau D, Villani S, Jacquemin B, Heinrich Jet al., 2023, Impact of long-term exposure to ambient ozone on lung function over a course of 20 years (The ECRHS study): a prospective cohort study in adults, The Lancet Regional Health. Europe, Vol: 34, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2666-7762

BackgroundWhile the adverse effects of short-term ambient ozone exposure on lung function are well-documented, the impact of long-term exposure remains poorly understood, especially in adults.MethodsWe aimed to investigate the association between long-term ozone exposure and lung function decline. The 3014 participants were drawn from 17 centers across eight countries, all of which were from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Spirometry was conducted to measure pre-bronchodilation forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) at approximately 35, 44, and 55 years of age. We assigned annual mean values of daily maximum running 8-h average ozone concentrations to individual residential addresses. Adjustments were made for PM2.5, NO2, and greenness. To capture the ozone-related change in spirometric parameters, our linear mixed effects regression models included an interaction term between long-term ozone exposure and age.FindingsMean ambient ozone concentrations were approximately 65 μg/m³. A one interquartile range increase of 7 μg/m³ in ozone was associated with a faster decline in FEV1 of −2.08 mL/year (95% confidence interval: −2.79, −1.36) and in FVC of −2.86 mL/year (−3.73, −1.99) mL/year over the study period. Associations were robust after adjusting for PM2.5, NO2, and greenness. The associations were more pronounced in residents of northern Europe and individuals who were older at baseline. No consistent associations were detected with the FEV1/FVC ratio.InterpretationLong-term exposure to elevated ambient ozone concentrations was associated with a faster decline of spirometric lung function among middle-aged European adults over a 20-year period.

Journal article

Markevych I, Zhao T, Fuertes E, Marcon A, Dadvand P, Vienneau D, Aymerich JG, Nowak D, de Hoogh K, Jarvis D, Abramson M, Accordini S, Amaral A, Bentouhami H, Bertelsen RJ, Boudier A, Bono R, Bowatte G, Casas L, Dharmage S, Forsberg B, Gislason T, Gnesi M, Holm M, Jacquemin B, Janson C, Jogi R, Johannessen A, Keidel D, Leynaert B, Maldonado Perez JA, Marchetti P, Migliore E, Martínez-Moratalla J, Orru H, Pin I, Potts J, Probst-Hensch N, Ranzi A, Sánchez-Ramos JL, Siroux V, Soussan D, Sunyer J, Urrutia Landa I, Villani S, Heinrich Jet al., 2023, Residential greenspace and lung function decline over 20 years in a prospective cohort: the ECRHS study, Environment International, Vol: 178, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0160-4120

BackgroundThe few studies that have examined associations between greenspace and lung function in adulthood have yielded conflicting results and none have examined whether the rate of lung function decline is affected.ObjectiveWe explored the association between residential greenspace and change in lung function over 20 years in 5559 adults from 22 centers in 11 countries participating in the population-based, international European Community Respiratory Health Survey.MethodsForced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) were measured by spirometry when participants were approximately 35 (1990–1994), 44 (1999–2003), and 55 (2010–2014) years old. Greenness was assessed as the mean Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) in 500 m, 300 m, and 100 m circular buffers around the residential addresses at the time of lung function measurement. Green spaces were defined as the presence of agricultural, natural, or urban green spaces in a circular 300 m buffer. Associations of these greenspace parameters with the rate of lung function change were assessed using adjusted linear mixed effects regression models with random intercepts for subjects nested within centers. Sensitivity analyses considered air pollution exposures.ResultsA 0.2-increase (average interquartile range) in NDVI in the 500 m buffer was consistently associated with a faster decline in FVC (−1.25 mL/year [95% confidence interval: −2.18 to −0.33]). These associations were especially pronounced in females and those living in areas with low PM10 levels. We found no consistent associations with FEV1 and the FEV1/FVC ratio. Residing near forests or urban green spaces was associated with a faster decline in FEV1, while agricultural land and forests were related to a greater decline in FVC.ConclusionsMore residential greenspace was not associated with better lung function in middle-aged European adults. Instead, we observed slight but consistent declin

Journal article

Lando V, Calciano L, Minelli C, Bombieri C, Ferrari M, Malerba G, Margagliotti A, Murgia N, Nicolis M, Olivieri M, Potts J, Tardivo S, Accordini Set al., 2023, <i>IL18</i> Gene Polymorphism Is Associated with Total IgE in Adult Subjects with Asthma, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, Vol: 12

Journal article

Knox-Brown B, Patel J, Potts J, Ahmed R, Aquart-Stewart A, Barbara C, Buist AS, Cherkaski HH, Denguezli M, Elbiaze M, Erhabor G, Franssen F, Al Ghobain M, Gislasson T, Janson C, Kocabas A, Mannino D, Marks G, Mortimer K, Nafees AA, Obaseki D, Paraguas S, Loh LC, Rashid A, Salvi S, Seemungal T, Studnicka M, Tan W, Wouters E, Abozid H, Mueller A, Burney P, Amaral Aet al., 2023, The association of spirometric small airways obstruction with respiratory symptoms, cardiometabolic diseases, and quality of life: Results from the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study, Respiratory Research, Vol: 24, ISSN: 1465-9921

Background:Spirometric small airways obstruction (SAO) is common in the general population. Whether spirometric SAO is associated with respiratory symptoms, cardiometabolic diseases, and quality of life (QoL) is unknown.Methods:Using data from the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study (N = 21,594), we defined spirometric SAO as the mean forced expiratory flow rate between 25 and 75% of the FVC (FEF25-75) less than the lower limit of normal (LLN) or the forced expiratory volume in 3 s to FVC ratio (FEV3/FVC) less than the LLN. We analysed data on respiratory symptoms, cardiometabolic diseases, and QoL collected using standardised questionnaires. We assessed the associations with spirometric SAO using multivariable regression models, and pooled site estimates using random effects meta-analysis. We conducted identical analyses for isolated spirometric SAO (i.e. with FEV1/FVC ≥ LLN).Results:Almost a fifth of the participants had spirometric SAO (19% for FEF25-75; 17% for FEV3/FVC). Using FEF25-75, spirometric SAO was associated with dyspnoea (OR = 2.16, 95% CI 1.77–2.70), chronic cough (OR = 2.56, 95% CI 2.08–3.15), chronic phlegm (OR = 2.29, 95% CI 1.77–4.05), wheeze (OR = 2.87, 95% CI 2.50–3.40) and cardiovascular disease (OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.11–1.52), but not hypertension or diabetes. Spirometric SAO was associated with worse physical and mental QoL. These associations were similar for FEV3/FVC. Isolated spirometric SAO (10% for FEF25-75; 6% for FEV3/FVC), was also associated with respiratory symptoms and cardiovascular disease.Conclusion:Spirometric SAO is associated with respiratory symptoms, cardiovascular disease, and QoL. Consideration should be given to the measurement of FEF25-75 and FEV3/FVC, in addition to traditional spirometry parameters.

Journal article

Feary J, Quintero Santofimio V, Potts J, Vermeulen R, Kromhout H, Knox-Brown B, Amaral Aet al., 2023, Occupational exposures and small airways obstruction in the UK Biobank Cohort, ERJ Open Research, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2312-0541

Background Small airways obstruction (SAO) is a key feature of both Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and asthma, which have been associated with workplace exposures. Whether SAO, which may occur early in the development of obstructive lung disease and without symptoms, also associates with occupational exposures is unknown.Methods Using UK Biobank data, we derived measurements of SAO from the 65,145 participants with high quality spirometry and lifetime occupational histories. The ALOHA+ Job Exposure Matrix was used to assign lifetime occupational exposures to each participant. The association between SAO and lifetime occupational exposures was evaluated using a logistic regression model adjusted for potential confounders. A second logistic regression model was run to also account for potential co-exposures.Results SAO was present in varying proportions of the population depending on definition used: 5.6% (FEF25–75<LLN)and 21.4% (FEV3/FEV6<LLN). After adjustment for confounders and co-exposures, people in the highest category of exposure to pesticides were significantly more likely to have SAO (FEV3/FEV6<LLN: OR 1.24, 95%CI 1.06–1.44). The association between pesticides and SAO showed an exposure-response pattern. SAO was also less likely among people in the highest exposure categories of aromatic solvents (FEV3/FEV6<LLN: OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.73–0.99) and metals (FEV3/FEV6<LLN: OR 0.77, 95%CI 0.62–0.94).Conclusion Our findings suggest that occupational exposure to pesticides play a role in the SAO. However, further work is needed to determine causality, and identify the specific component(s) responsible and the underlying mechanisms involved.

Journal article

Knox-Brown B, Patel J, Potts J, Ahmed R, Aquart-Stewart A, Cherkaski HH, Denguezli M, Elbiaze M, Elsony A, Franssen F, Al Ghobain M, Harrabi I, Janson C, Jogi R, Juvekar S, Lawin H, Mannino D, Mortimer K, Nafees A, Nielsen R, Obaseki D, Paraguas S, Rashid A, Loh LC, Salvi S, Seemungal T, Studnicka M, Tan W, Wouters E, Barbara C, Gislason T, Gunasekera K, Burney P, Amaral Aet al., 2023, Prevalence of small airways obstruction and its risk factors in the multinational Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study, The Lancet Global Health, Vol: 11, Pages: e69-e82, ISSN: 2214-109X

Background:Small Airways Obstruction (SAO) is a common feature of obstructive lung diseases. There is limited research on SAO, its global prevalence and risk factors.Methods:Using data from 41 sites in the cross-sectional Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study (N=26,448), we defined SAO as either: 1) mean forced expiratory flow rate between 25% and 75% of the forced vital capacity (FEF25-75) less than lower limit of normal (LLN), or 2) forced expiratory volume in three seconds to forced vital capacity ratio (FEV3/FVC) less than the LLN. We estimated the prevalence of pre- and post-bronchodilator SAO for each site. To identify risk factors for SAO, we performed multivariable regression analyses within each site, and pooled estimates using random effects meta-analysis.Findings:Prevalence of pre-bronchodilator SAO ranged from 5% (34/624) in Tartu (Estonia) to 34% (189/555) in Mysore (India) for FEF25-75, while for FEV3/FVC it ranged from 5% (31/667) in Riyadh (Saudi Arabia) to 31% (287/981) in Salzburg (Austria). Prevalence of post-bronchodilator SAO was universally lower. Risk factors associated with FEV3/FVC included increasing age, low body mass index, active and passive smoking, low level of education, working in a dusty job for more than 10 years, and previous tuberculosis. Results were similar for FEF25-75, except for increasing age, which was associated with reduced odds of SAO.Interpretation:Despite the wide geographical variation, SAO is common and more prevalent than chronic airflow obstruction worldwide. SAO shows the same risk factors as chronic airflow obstruction. However, further research is required to investigate whether it also associates with respiratory symptoms and lung function decline.Funding:National Heart and Lung Institute; Wellcome Trust (085790/Z/08/Z).

Journal article

Elfadaly FG, Adamson A, Patel J, Potts L, Potts J, Blangiardo M, Thompson J, Minelli Cet al., 2021, BIMAM-a tool for imputing variables missing across datasets using a Bayesian imputation and analysis model, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 50, Pages: 1419-1425, ISSN: 0300-5771

Journal article

Lyons SA, Knulst AC, Burney PGJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ballmer-Weber BK, Barreales L, Bieli C, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kummeling I, Kralimarkova T, Mustakov TB, van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Potts J, Versteeg SA, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Mills C, van Ree R, Le T-Met al., 2021, Predicting food allergy: The value of patient history reinforced, ALLERGY, Vol: 76, Pages: 1454-1462, ISSN: 0105-4538

Journal article

Charles D, Gethings LA, Potts JF, Burney PGJ, Garcia-Larsen Vet al., 2021, Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics for the discovery of candidate markers of flavonoid and polyphenolic intake in adults, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2045-2322

Robust biological markers of dietary exposure are essential in improving the understanding of the link between diet and health outcomes. Polyphenolic compounds, including flavonoids, have been proposed to mitigate the risk of chronic diseases where oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role. Biomarkers can provide objective measurement of the levels of polyphenolic compounds. In this study, we provide methodology to identify potential candidate markers of polyphenol intake in human serum. Seventeen participants from the UK arm of the Global Allergy and Asthma Network of Excellence (GA2LEN) had their dietary intake estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and serum samples were assessed using mass spectrometry to identify potential candidate markers. 144 features were assigned identities, of these we identified four biologically relevant compounds (rhamnazin 3-rutinoside, 2-galloyl-1,4-galactarolactone methyl ester, 2″,32″-di-O-p-coumaroylafzelin and cyclocommunin), which were significantly increased in the serum of participants with high predicted level of fruit and vegetable intake. 2-galloyl-1,4-galactarolactone methyl ester was strongly correlated with total flavonoids (r = 0.62; P = 0.005), flavan-3-ols (r = 0.67; P = 0.002) as well as with other four subclasses. Rhamnazin 3-rutinoside showed strong correlation with pro-anthocyanidins (r = 0.68; P = 0.001), flavones (r = 0.62; P = 0.005). Our results suggest that serum profiling for these compounds might be an effective way of establishing the relative intake of flavonoids and could contribute to improve the accuracy of epidemiological methods to ascertain flavonoid intake.

Journal article

Lyons SA, Knulst AC, Burney PGJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ballmer-Weber BK, Barreales L, Bieli C, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Potts J, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Mills ENC, van Ree R, Thuy-My Let al., 2020, Predictors of Food Sensitization in Children and Adults Across Europe, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 8, Pages: 3074-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Axson E, Lewis A, Potts J, Pang M, Dickenson S, Vioix H, Quint Jet al., 2020, Inhaled therapies for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis, BMJ Open, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives To integrate evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies on the efficacy of inhaled treatments for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using network meta-analyses.Methods Systematic searches MEDLINE and Embase based on predetermined criteria. Network meta-analyses of RCTs investigated efficacy on exacerbations (long-term: ≥20 weeks of treatment; short-term: <20 weeks), lung function (≥12 weeks), health-related quality of life, mortality and adverse events. Qualitative comparisons of efficacies between RCTs and observational studies.Results 212 RCTs and 19 observational studies were included. Compared with combined long-acting beta-adrenoceptor agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LABA+LAMA), triple therapy (LABA+LAMA+inhaled corticosteroid) was significantly more effective at reducing exacerbations (long-term 0.85 (95% CI: 0.78 to 0.94; short-term 0.67 (95% CI: 0.49 to 0.92)) and mortality (0.72 (95% CI: 0.59 to 0.89)) but was also associated with increased pneumonia (1.35 (95% CI: 1.10 to 1.67)). No differences in lung function (0.02 (95% CI: −0.10 to 0.14)), health-related quality of life (−1.12 (95% CI: −3.83 to 1.59)) or other adverse events (1.02 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.08)) were found. Most of the observational evidence trended in the same direction as pooled RCT data.Conclusion Further evidence, especially pragmatic trials, are needed to fully understand the characteristics of patient subgroups who may benefit from triple therapy and for those whom the extra risk of adverse events, such as pneumonia, may outweigh any benefits.

Journal article

Lyons SA, Clausen M, Knulst AC, Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Barreales L, Bieli C, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kralimarkova T, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Potts J, Mills ENC, van Ree R, Burney PGJ, Thuy-My Let al., 2020, Prevalence of Food Sensitization and Food Allergy in Children Across Europe, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 8, Pages: 2736-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Lyons SA, Clausen M, Knulst AC, Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Barreales L, Bieli C, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kralimarkova T, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Potts J, Mills ENC, Van Ree R, Burney PG, Le TTMet al., 2020, Prevalence of food sensitisation and food allergy in children across Europe, European-Academy-of-Allergology-and-Clinical-Immunology Digital Congress (EAACI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 89-90, ISSN: 0105-4538

Conference paper

Lyons SA, Knulst AC, Burney PGJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ballmer-Weber BK, Barreales L, Bieli C, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, Van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Potts J, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Mills ENC, Van Ree R, Le TTMet al., 2020, Predictors of food sensitisation in European children and adults, European-Academy-of-Allergology-and-Clinical-Immunology Digital Congress (EAACI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 250-251, ISSN: 0105-4538

Conference paper

Sundaram V, Rothnie K, Bloom C, Zakeri R, Sahadevan J, Singh A, Nagai T, Potts J, Wedzicha J, Smeeth L, Simon D, Timmis A, Rajagopalan S, Quint JKet al., 2020, Impact of comorbidities on peak troponin levels and mortality in acute myocardial infarction, Heart, Vol: 106, Pages: 677-685, ISSN: 1355-6037

OBJECTIVES: To characterise peak cardiac troponin levels, in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to their comorbid condition and determine the influence of peak cardiac troponin (cTn) levels on mortality. METHODS: We included patients with the first admission for AMI in the UK. We used linear regression to estimate the association between eight common comorbidities (diabetes mellitus, previous angina, peripheral arterial disease, previous myocardial infarction (MI), chronic kidney disease (CKD), cerebrovascular disease, chronic heart failure (CHF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)) and peak cTn. Peak cTn levels were adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and comorbidities. Logistic regression and restricted cubic spline models were employed to investigate the association between peak cTn and 180-day mortality for each comorbidity. RESULTS: 330 367 patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction and non-ST elevation myocardial infarction were identified. Adjusted peak cTn levels were significantly higher in patients with CKD (adjusted % difference in peak cTnT for CKD=42%, 95% CI 13.1 to 78.4) and significantly lower for patients with COPD, previous angina, previous MI and CHF when compared with patients without the respective comorbidities (reference group) (cTnI; COPD=-21.7%, 95% CI -29.1 to -13.4; previous angina=-24.2%, 95% CI -29.6 to -8.3; previous MI=-13.5%, 95% CI -20.6 to -5.9; CHF=-28%, 95% CI -37.2 to -17.6). Risk of 180-day mortality in most of the comorbidities did not change substantially after adjusting for peak cTn. In general, cTnI had a stronger association with mortality than cTnT. CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide analysis of patients presenting with AMI, comorbidities substantially influenced systemic concentrations of peak cTn. Comorbid illness is a significant predictor of mortality regardless of peak cTn levels and should be taken into consideration while interpr

Journal article

Li J, Ogorodova LM, Mahesh PA, Wang MH, Fedorova OS, Leung TF, Fernandez-Rivas M, Mills ENC, Potts J, Kummeling I, Versteeg SA, van Ree R, Yazdanbakhsh M, Burney PGJ, Wong GWKet al., 2020, Comparative Study of Food Allergies in Children from China, India, and Russia: The EuroPrevall-INCO Surveys, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 8, Pages: 1349-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Studnicka M, Horner A, Sator L, Buist AS, Lamprecht B, Zhong N, Liu S, Lu J, Ran P, Wang D, Zheng J, Zhou Y, Kocabas A, Hancioglu A, Hanta I, Kuleci S, Turkyilmaz AS, Umut S, Unalan T, Dawes T, Bateman E, Jithoo A, Adams D, Barnes E, Freeman J, Hayes A, Hlengwa S, Johannisen C, Koopman M, Louw I, Ludick I, Olckers A, Ryck J, Storbeck J, Gislason T, Benedikdtsdottir B, Jorundsdottir K, Gudmundsdottir L, Gudmundsdottir S, Gundmundsson G, Nizankowska-Mogilnicka E, Frey J, Harat R, Mejza F, Nastalek P, Pajak A, Skucha W, Szczeklik A, Twardowska M, Welte T, Bodemann I, Geldmacher H, Schweda-Linow A, Gulsvik A, Endresen T, Svendsen L, Tan WC, Wang W, Mannino DM, Cain J, Copeland R, Hazen D, Methvin J, Renato, Amarillo L, Berratio LU, Fernandez LC, Francisco NA, Garcia GS, de Guia TS, Idolor LF, Naval SS, Reyes T, Roa CC, Sanchez F, Simpao LP, Jenkins C, Marks G, Bird T, Espinel P, Hardaker K, Toelle B, Burney PGJ, Amor C, Potts J, Tumilty M, McLean F, Wouters EFM, Wesseling GJ, Barbara C, Rodrigues F, Dias H, Cardoso J, Almeida J, Matos MJ, Simao P, Santos M, Ferreira R, Janson C, Olafsdottir IS, Nisser K, Spetz-Nystrom U, Hagg G, Lund G-M, Jogi R, Laja H, Ulst K, Zobel V, Lill T-J, Koul PA, Malik S, Hakim NA, Khan UH, Chowgule R, Shetye V, Raphael J, Almeda R, Tawde M, Tadvi R, Katkar S, Kadam M, Dhanawade R, Ghurup U, Harrabi I, Denguezli M, Tabka Z, Daldoul H, Boukheroufa Z, Chouikha F, Khalifa WB, Idolor LF, de Guia TS, Francisco NA, Roa CC, Ayuyao FG, Tady CZ, Tan DT, Banal-Yang S, Balanag VM, Reyes MTN, Dantes RB, Juvekar S, Hirve S, Sambhudas S, Chaidhary B, Tambe M, Pingale S, Umap A, Umap A, Shelar N, Devchakke S, Chaudhary S, Bondre S, Walke S, Gawhane A, Sapkal A, Argade R, Gaikwad V, Salvi S, Brashier B, Londhe J, Madas S, Obaseki D, Erhabor G, Awopeju O, Adewole Oet al., 2020, COPD Should Diagnosis Match Physiology?, CHEST, Vol: 157, Pages: 473-+, ISSN: 0012-3692

Journal article

Sundaram V, Rothnie K, Bloom C, Zakeri R, Sahadevan J, singh A, Nagai T, Potts J, Wedzicha J, smeeth L, simon D, timmis A, Rajagopalan S, Quint Jet al., 2019, The impact of co-morbidities on peak troponin levels and mortality in acute myocardial infarction: A population based, nationwide study, Heart, ISSN: 1355-6037

Objectives: To characterize peak cardiac troponin levels, in patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), according to their comorbid condition and determine the influence of peak troponin (cTn) levels on mortality. Methods: We included patients with the first admission for AMI in the United Kingdom. We used linear regression to estimate the association between eight common co-morbidities {diabetes mellitus(DM), previous angina, peripheral arterial disease(PAD), previous myocardial infarction(MI), chronic kidney disease(CKD), cerebrovascular disease(CVD), chronic heart failure(CHF), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease(COPD)} and peak cTn. Peak cTn levels were adjusted for age, sex, smoking status and co-morbidities. Logistic regression and restricted cubic spline models were employed to investigate the association between peak cTn and 180-day mortality for each co-morbidity. Results: 330,367 patients with AMI were identified. Adjusted peak cTn levels were significantly higher in patients with CKD[adjusted % difference in peak cTnT for CKD=42%, 95%CI 13.1 to 78.4] and significantly lower for patients with COPD, previous angina, previous MI and CHF when compared to patients without the respective co-morbidities (reference group) [cTnI;COPD=-21.7%,95%CI -29.1 to -13.4;previous angina=-24.2%, 95%CI -29.6 to -8.3;previous MI=-13.5%, 95%CI -20.6 to -5.9;CHF=-28% 95%CI -37.2 to -17.6]. Risk of 180-day mortality in most of the co-morbidities did not change substantially after adjusting for peak cTn. In general, cTnI had a stronger association with mortality than cTnT.Conclusions: In this nationwide analyses of patients presenting with acute myocardial infarction, co-morbidities substantially influenced systemic concentrations of peak cTn. Comorbid illness is a significant predictor of mortality regardless of peak cTn levels and should be taken into consideration while interpreting cTn both as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker.

Journal article

van der Plaat D, Pereira M, Pesce G, Potts J, Amaral A, Dharmage S, Garcia-Aymerich J, Thompson J, Gomez-Real F, Jarvis D, Minelli C, Leynaert Bet al., 2019, Age at menopause and lung function: a mendelian randomization study, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 54, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0903-1936

In observational studies, early menopause is associated with lower FVC and a higher risk of spirometric restriction, but not airflow obstruction. It is however unclear if this association is causal. We therefore used a Mendelian randomization (MR) approach, which is not affected by classical confounding, to assess the effect of age at natural menopause on lung function. We included 94,742 naturally post-menopausal women from UK Biobank and performed MR analyses on the effect of age at menopause on FEV1, FVC, FEV1/FVC, spirometric restriction (FVC<LLN) and airflow obstruction (FEV1/FVC<LLN). We used the inverse variance-weighted (IVW) method, as well as methods that adjust for pleiotropy, and compared MR with observational analyses. The MR analyses showed higher FEV1/FVC and a 15% lower risk of airflow obstruction for women with early (<45 years) compared to normal (45-55) menopause. Despite some evidence of pleiotropy, the results were consistent when using MR methods robust to pleiotropy. Similar results were found among never- and ever-smokers, while the protective effect seemed less strong in women ever using menopause hormone treatment and in overweight women. There was no strong evidence of association with FVC or spirometric restriction. In observational analyses of the same dataset, early menopause was associated with a pronounced reduction in FVC and a 13% higher spirometric restriction risk.Our MR results suggest that early menopause has a protective effect on airflow obstruction. Further studies are warranted to better understand the inconsistency with observational findings, and to investigate the underlying mechanisms and role of female sex hormones.

Journal article

Lenoir A, Potts J, Quint J, Jarvis Det al., 2019, Who do we exclude if we only consider subjects with excellent quality spirometry? Analysis of UK Biobank longitudinal data, International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Markevych I, Fuertes E, Marcon A, Dadvand P, Nowak D, Aymerich JG, Vienneau D, De Hoogh K, Jarvis D, Abramson MJ, Accordini S, Amaral A, Bentouhami H, Bertelsen RJ, Boudier A, Bono R, Bowatte G, Carsin A-E, Dharmage SC, Forsberg B, Gislason T, Gnesi M, Holm M, Jacquemin B, Janson C, Jogi R, Johannessen A, Keidel D, Leynaert B, Perez JAM, Marchetti P, Migliore E, Martinez Moratalla J, Olsson D, Orru H, Pin I, Potts J, Probst-Hensch N, Ranzi A, Luis Sanchez-Ramos J, Siroux V, Schindler C, Soussan D, Sunyer J, Svanes C, Urrutia Landa I, Villani S, Weyler J, Heinrich Jet al., 2019, Residential greenness and lung function in a prospective cohort of European adults: The ECRHS study, International Congress of the European-Respiratory-Society (ERS), Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Lyons SA, Burney PGJ, Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Barreales L, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Fritsche P, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kralimarkova T, Kummeling I, Lebens AFM, Mustakov T, Van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Sakellariou A, Welsing PMJ, Potts J, Mills ENC, Van Ree R, Knulst AC, Le TTMet al., 2019, Substantial variation in food allergy prevalence and causative foods in adults across Europe, Congress of the European-Academy-of-Allergy-and-Clinical-Immunology (EAACI), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 503-503, ISSN: 0105-4538

Conference paper

Sator L, Horner A, Studnicka M, Lamprecht B, Kaiser B, McBurnie MA, Buist AS, Gnatiuc L, Mannino DM, Janson C, Bateman ED, Burney P, BOLD Collaborative Research Groupet al., 2019, Overdiagnosis of COPD in subjects with unobstructed spirometry: a BOLD analysis, Chest, Vol: 156, Pages: 277-288, ISSN: 0012-3692

BACKGROUND: There are several reports on underdiagnosis of COPD, while little is known about COPD overdiagnosis and overtreatment. We describe the overdiagnosis and the prevalence of spirometrically defined false positive COPD, as well as their relationship with overtreatment across 23 population samples in 20 countries participating in the BOLD Study between 2003 and 2012. METHODS: A false positive diagnosis of COPD was considered when participants reported a doctor's diagnosis of COPD, but postbronchodilator spirometry was unobstructed (FEV1/FVC > LLN). Additional analyses were performed using the fixed ratio criterion (FEV1/FVC < 0.7). RESULTS: Among 16,177 participants, 919 (5.7%) reported a previous medical diagnosis of COPD. Postbronchodilator spirometry was unobstructed in 569 subjects (61.9%): false positive COPD. A similar rate of overdiagnosis was seen when using the fixed ratio criterion (55.3%). In a subgroup analysis excluding participants who reported a diagnosis of "chronic bronchitis" or "emphysema" (n = 220), 37.7% had no airflow limitation. The site-specific prevalence of false positive COPD varied greatly, from 1.9% in low- to middle-income countries to 4.9% in high-income countries. In multivariate analysis, overdiagnosis was more common among women, and was associated with higher education; former and current smoking; the presence of wheeze, cough, and phlegm; and concomitant medical diagnosis of asthma or heart disease. Among the subjects with false positive COPD, 45.7% reported current use of respiratory medication. Excluding patients with reported asthma, 34.4% of those with normal spirometry still used a respiratory medication. CONCLUSIONS: False positive COPD is frequent. This might expose nonobstructed subjects to possible adverse effects of respiratory medication.

Journal article

Lyons SA, Burney PGJ, Ballmer-Weber BK, Fernandez-Rivas M, Barreales L, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Fritsche P, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kralimarkova T, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, Lebens AFM, van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Sakellariou A, Welsing PMJ, Potts J, Mills ENC, van Ree R, Knulst AC, Le T-Met al., 2019, Food allergy in adults: substantial variation in prevalence and causative foods across Europe, Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology: In Practice, Vol: 7, Pages: 1920-1928.e11, ISSN: 2213-2198

BACKGROUND: The EuroPrevall study showed that prevalence of self-reported food allergy (FA) in adults across Europe ranged from 2-37% for any food and 1-19% for 24 selected foods. OBJECTIVE: To determine prevalence of probable FA (symptoms plus sIgE-sensitisation) and challenge-confirmed FA in European adults, along with symptoms and causative foods. METHODS: In phase I of the EuroPrevall project, a screening questionnaire was sent to a random sample of the general adult population in eight European centres. Phase II consisted of an extensive questionnaire on reactions to 24 pre-selected commonly implicated foods, and measurement of sIgE. Multiple imputation was performed performed to estimate missing symptom and serology information for non-responders. In the final phase, subjects with probable FA were invited for double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge. RESULTS: Prevalence of probable FA in adults in Athens, Reykjavik, Utrecht, Lodz, Madrid and Zurich was respectively 0.3%, 1.4%, 2.1%, 2.8%, 3.3% and 5.6%. Oral allergy symptoms were reported most frequently (81.6%), followed by skin symptoms (38.2%) and rhino-conjunctivitis (29.5%). Hazelnut, peach and apple were the most common causative foods in Lodz, Utrecht and Zurich. Peach was also among the top three causative foods in Athens and Madrid. Shrimp and fish allergies were relatively common in Madrid and Reykjavik. Of the 55 food challenges performed, 72.8% was classified as positive. CONCLUSION: Food allergy shows substantial geographical variation in prevalence and causative foods across Europe. Although probable FA is less common than self-reported FA, prevalence still reaches 6% in parts of Europe.

Journal article

Feary JR, Schofield SJ, Canizales J, Fitzgerald B, Potts J, Jones M, Cullinan Pet al., 2019, Laboratory animal allergy is preventable in modern research facilities, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 53, ISSN: 0903-1936

BACKGROUND: Historical data suggest 15% of laboratory animal workers develop IgE sensitisation and 10% symptoms of laboratory animal allergy (LAA), including occupational asthma. Individually ventilated cages (IVC) are replacing conventional open cages; we sought to evaluate their impact on the development of LAA. METHODS: We surveyed 750 laboratory animal workers and measured airborne Mus m 1 (mouse allergen) levels in seven UK institutions. We compared the prevalence of sensitisation to mouse proteins (by specific IgE assay or skin prick test) and of work-related allergic symptoms in IVC-only and open cage units. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Full shift Mus m 1 levels were lower in IVC than open cage units (geometric mean 1.00 ng·m-3 (95% confidence interval: 0.73-1.36) versus8.35 ng·m-3 (6.97-9.95); p<0.001) but varied eight-fold across the IVC units (GM range: 0.33-4.12 ng·m-3). Primary analyses on data from 216 participants with <3 years' exposure to mice revealed a lower prevalence of sensitisation in those working in IVC compared with conventional cage units (2.4% (n=2) versus9.8% (n=13); p=0.052). Sensitisation in IVC units varied from 0% to 12.5%; the use of fitted respiratory protection was less common in IVC units where prevalence of sensitisation was higher. Work-related allergy symptoms were more frequently reported by mouse sensitised individuals (46.7% versus 10.9%, p<0.001); and only by those working in open cage units. CONCLUSION: In contemporary practice, LAA is now largely preventable with the use of IVC systems and the judicious use of appropriate respiratory protection.

Journal article

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