Imperial College London

DrJamesRosindell

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Reader in Biodiversity Theory
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2242j.rosindell

 
 
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Location

 

W1.5KennedySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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50 results found

Rosindell J, Harmon LJ, 2012, OneZoom: A Fractal Explorer for the Tree of Life, PLOS BIOLOGY, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1545-7885

Journal article

Wennekes PL, Rosindell J, Etienne RS, 2012, The Neutral-Niche Debate: A Philosophical Perspective, ACTA BIOTHEORETICA, Vol: 60, Pages: 257-271, ISSN: 0001-5342

Journal article

Etienne RS, Rosindell J, 2012, Comment on "Global Correlations in Tropical Tree Species Richness and Abundance Reject Neutrality", SCIENCE, Vol: 336, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Etienne RS, de Visser SN, Janzen T, Olsen JL, Olff H, Rosindell Jet al., 2012, Can clade age alone explain the relationship between body size and diversity?, INTERFACE FOCUS, Vol: 2, Pages: 170-179, ISSN: 2042-8898

Journal article

Rosindell J, Hubbell SP, He F, Harmon LJ, Etienne RSet al., 2012, The case for ecological neutral theory, TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 27, Pages: 203-208, ISSN: 0169-5347

Journal article

Etienne RS, Rosindell J, 2012, Prolonging the Past Counteracts the Pull of the Present: Protracted Speciation Can Explain Observed Slowdowns in Diversification, SYSTEMATIC BIOLOGY, Vol: 61, Pages: 204-213, ISSN: 1063-5157

Journal article

Rosindell J, Jansen PA, Etienne RS, 2012, Age structure in neutral theory resolves inconsistencies related to reproductive-size threshold, Journal of Plant Ecology, Vol: 5, Pages: 64-71

AimsNeutral theory consists of a suite of models that assume ecological equivalence among individual organisms. They have been most commonly applied to tropical forest tree communities either as null models or as approximations. Neutral models typically only include reproductive adults; therefore, fitting to empirical tree community data requires defining a reproductive-size threshold, which for trees is usually set arbitrarily to a diameter at breast height (DBH) of 100 mm. The inevitable exclusion of some reproductive adults and inclusion of some saplings cause a non-random sampling bias in neutral model fits. Here, we investigate this problem and resolve it by introducing simple age structure into a neutral model.MethodsWe compared the performance and sensitivity of DBH threshold of three variants of a spatially explicit neutral model: the traditional model, a model incorporating random sampling and a model with two distinct age classes—reproductive adults and saplings. In the age-structured model, saplings are offspring from adults that disperse according to a Gaussian dispersal kernel around the adults. The only extra parameter is the ratio of adults to saplings, which is not a free parameter but directly measurable. We used species–area relation- ships (SARs) to explore the predicted effect of saplings on the species richness at different scales in our model. We then evaluated the three model variations to find the parameters required to maintain the ob- served level of species richness in the 50-ha plot on Barro Colorado Island (BCI). We repeated our analysis filtering the data at differentINTRODUCTIONNeutral theory refers to a collection of neutral models each as- suming ecological equivalence between individuals (Bellminimum tree-size thresholds in order to find the effect this threshold has on our results. Lastly, we used empirical species–individual rela- tionships (SIRs) to test the pre-existing hypothesis that environmental filtering i

Journal article

McInnes L, Baker WJ, Barraclough TG, Dasmahapatra KK, Goswami A, Harmon LJ, Morlon H, Purvis A, Rosindell J, Thomas GH, Turvey ST, Phillimore ABet al., 2011, Integrating ecology into macroevolutionary research, BIOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 7, Pages: 644-646, ISSN: 1744-9561

Journal article

Rosindell J, Hubbell SP, Etienne RS, 2011, The Unified Neutral Theory of Biodiversity and Biogeography at Age Ten, TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 26, Pages: 340-348, ISSN: 0169-5347

Journal article

Rosindell J, Phillimore AB, 2011, A unified model of island biogeography sheds light on the zone of radiation, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 14, Pages: 552-560, ISSN: 1461-023X

Journal article

Etienne RS, Rosindell J, 2011, The Spatial Limitations of Current Neutral Models of Biodiversity, PLOS ONE, Vol: 6, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Keil P, Herben T, Rosindell J, Storch Det al., 2010, Predictions of Taylor's power law, density dependence and pink noise from a neutrally modeled time series, JOURNAL OF THEORETICAL BIOLOGY, Vol: 265, Pages: 78-86, ISSN: 0022-5193

Journal article

Kurka P, Sizling AL, Rosindell J, 2010, Analytical evidence for scale-invariance in the shape of species abundance distributions, MATHEMATICAL BIOSCIENCES, Vol: 223, Pages: 151-159, ISSN: 0025-5564

Journal article

Rosindell J, Cornell SJ, Hubbell SP, Etienne RSet al., 2010, Protracted speciation revitalizes the neutral theory of biodiversity, Ecology Letters, Pages: 716-727

Understanding the maintenance and origin of biodiversity is a formidable task, yet many ubiquitous ecological patterns are predicted by a surprisingly simple and widely studied neutral model that ignores functional differences between species. However, this model assumes that new species arise instantaneously as singletons and consequently makes unrealistic predictions about species lifetimes, speciation rates and number of rare species. Here, we resolve these anomalies – without compromising any of the original model’s existing achievements and retaining computational and analytical tractability – by modelling speciation as a gradual, protracted, process rather than an instantaneous event. Our model also makes new predictions about the diversity of ÔincipientÕ species and rare species in the metacommunity. We show that it is both necessary and straightforward to incorporate protracted speciation in future studies of neutral models, and argue that non- neutral models should also model speciation as a gradual process rather than an instantaneous one.

Journal article

Leigh EG, Rosindell J, Etienne RS, 2010, Unified neutral theory of biodiversity and biogeography, Scholarpedia, Vol: 5

Journal article

Rosindell J, Cornell SJ, 2009, Species-area curves, neutral models, and long-distance dispersal, ECOLOGY, Vol: 90, Pages: 1743-1750, ISSN: 0012-9658

Journal article

Rosindell J, Wong Y, Etienne RS, 2008, A coalescence approach to spatial neutral ecology, Ecological Informatics, Vol: 3, Pages: 259-271

Neutral models in ecology have attracted much attention in recent literature. They can provide considerable insight into the roles of non-species-specific factors (e.g. stochasticity, dispersal, speciation) on community dynamics but often require intensive simulations, particularly in spatial settings. Here, we clearly explain existing techniques for modelling spatially explicit neutral processes in ecology using coalescence. Furthermore, we present several novel extensions to these methods including procedures for dealing with system boundaries which enable improved investigation of the effects of dispersal. We also present a semi-analytical algorithm that calculates the expected species richness in a sample, for any speciation rate. By eliminating the effect of stochasticity in the speciation process, we reduce the variance in estimates of species richness. Our benchmarks show that the combination of existing coalescence theory and our extensions produces higher quality results in vastly shorter time scales than previously possible: years of simulation time are reduced to minutes. As an example application, we find parameters for a spatially explicit neutral model to approximate the species richness of a tropical forest dataset.

Journal article

Rosindell J, Cornell SJ, 2007, Species-area relationships from a spatially explicit neutral model in an infinite landscape, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 10, Pages: 586-595, ISSN: 1461-023X

Journal article

Rosindell J, Manson K, Gumbs R, Pearse WD, Steel Met al., Information Accumulation and Loss as a Foundation for Sound Phylogenetic Biodiversity Metrics

<jats:title>A<jats:sc>bstract</jats:sc></jats:title><jats:p>Phylogenetic metrics are essential tools in ecology, evolution and conservation, and Phylogenetic Diversity (PD) is one of the most prominent measures of biodiversity. PD is based on the idea that biological features accumulate along the branches of phylogenetic trees, and that these features are of biological importance. We argue that PD, and other phylogenetic biodiversity metrics, fail to capture an essential biological process: ‘information loss’, whereby features, and biological information in general, can be lost through the process of evolution. We introduce Generalised Phylogeny Diversity (GPD), which is founded on the joint processes of information accumulation and loss and can be applied to phylogenetic trees or more complex networks. We derive a dimensionless measure <jats:italic>ϕ</jats:italic> from GPD that reproduces species richness and PD at opposite ends of a continuum of information loss intensity. We suggest how the existing calculus of PD-based metrics, and other phylogenetic biodiversity metrics, can be recast to incorporate information loss. To illustrate our approach, we give three empirical applications all reliant on new measures using the information loss concept. First, in ecology, evaluating <jats:italic>ϕ</jats:italic> as a predictor of community productivity against species richness and PD. Second, in evolution, quantifying living fossils and resolving their associated controversy. Third, in conservation, using a partitioning of GPD to re-balance our priorities at the broad scale of the complete tree of life.</jats:p>

Journal article

Desjardins-Proulx P, Rosindell JL, Poisot T, Gravel Det al., A simple model to study phylogeographies and speciation patterns in space

In this working paper, we present a simple theoretical framework based onnetwork theory to study how speciation, the process by which new speciesappear, shapes spatial patterns of diversity. We show that this framework canbe expanded to account for different types of networks and interactions, andincorporates different modes of speciation.

Working paper

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