Imperial College London

DrJessicaStrid

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Medicine

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 1475j.strid

 
 
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Location

 

9N15BCommonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

51 results found

Crawford G, Hayes MD, Seoane RC, Ward S, Dalessandri T, Lai C, Healy E, Kipling D, Proby C, Moyes C, Green K, Best K, Haniffa M, Botto M, Dunn-Walters D, Strid Jet al., 2018, Epithelial damage and tissue gamma delta T cells promote a unique tumor-protective IgE response, NATURE IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 19, Pages: 859-870, ISSN: 1529-2908

IgE is an ancient and conserved immunoglobulin isotype with potent immunological function. Nevertheless, the regulation of IgE responses remains an enigma, and evidence of a role for IgE in host defense is limited. Here we report that topical exposure to a common environmental DNA-damaging xenobiotic initiated stress surveillance by γδTCR+ intraepithelial lymphocytes that resulted in class switching to IgE in B cells and the accumulation of autoreactive IgE. High-throughput antibody sequencing revealed that γδ T cells shaped the IgE repertoire by supporting specific variable-diversity-joining (VDJ) rearrangements with unique characteristics of the complementarity-determining region CDRH3. This endogenous IgE response, via the IgE receptor FcεRI, provided protection against epithelial carcinogenesis, and expression of the gene encoding FcεRI in human squamous-cell carcinoma correlated with good disease prognosis. These data indicate a joint role for immunosurveillance by T cells and by B cells in epithelial tissues and suggest that IgE is part of the host defense against epithelial damage and tumor development.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ling GS, Crawford G, Buang N, Bartok I, Tian K, Thielens NM, Bally I, Harker JA, Ashton-Rickardt PG, Rutschmann S, Strid J, Botto Met al., 2018, C1q restrains autoimmunity and viral infection by regulating CD8+ T cell metabolism, Science, Vol: 360, Pages: 558-563, ISSN: 0036-8075

Deficiency of C1q, the initiator of the complement classical pathway, is associated with the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Explaining this association in terms of abnormalities in the classical pathway alone remains problematic because C3 deficiency does not predispose to SLE. Here, using a mouse model of SLE, we demonstrate that C1q, but not C3, restrains the response to self-antigens by modulating the mitochondrial metabolism of CD8+ T cells, which can themselves propagate autoimmunity. C1q deficiency also triggers an exuberant effector CD8+ T cell response to chronic viral infection leading to lethal immunopathology. These data establish a link between C1q and CD8+ T cell metabolism and may explain how C1q protects against lupus, with implications for the role of viral infections in the perpetuation of autoimmunity.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Silva-Santos B, Strid J, 2018, Working in "NK Mode": Natural Killer Group 2 Member D and Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors in Stress-Surveillance by gamma delta T Cells, FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 9, ISSN: 1664-3224

Natural killer cell receptors (NKRs) are germline-encoded transmembrane proteins that regulate the activation and homeostasis of NK cells as well as other lymphocytes. For γδ T cells, NKRs play critical roles in discriminating stressed (transformed or infected) cells from their healthy counterparts, as proposed in the “lymphoid stress-surveillance” theory. Whereas the main physiologic role is seemingly fulfilled by natural killer group 2 member D, constitutively expressed by γδ T cells, enhancement of their therapeutic potential may rely on natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs), like NKp30 or NKp44, that can be induced selectively on human Vδ1+ T cells. Here, we review the contributions of NCRs, NKG2D, and their multiple ligands, to γδ T cell biology in mouse and human.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Duggan SP, Garry C, Behan FM, Phipps S, Kudo H, Kirca M, Zaheer A, McGarrigle S, Reynolds JV, Goldin R, Kalloger SE, Schaeffer DF, Long A, Strid J, Kelleher Det al., 2018, siRNA library screening identifies a druggable immune-signature driving esophageal adenocarcinoma cell growth, Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol: 5, Pages: 569-590, ISSN: 2352-345X

Background & Aims: Effective therapeutic approaches are urgently required to tackle the alarmingly poor survival outcomes in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) patients. EAC originates from within the intestinal-type metaplasia, Barrett’s esophagus, a condition arising on a background of gastroesophageal reflux disease and associated inflammation.Methods:This study used a druggable genome small interfering RNA (siRNA) screening library of 6022 siRNAs in conjunction with bioinformatics platforms, genomic studies of EAC tissues, somatic variation data of EAC from The Cancer Genome Atlas data of EAC, and pathologic and functional studies to define novel EAC-associated, and targetable, immune factors.Results:By using a druggable genome library we defined genes that sustain EAC cell growth, which included an unexpected immunologic signature. Integrating Cancer Genome Atlas data with druggable siRNA targets showed a striking concordance and an EAC-specific gene amplification event associated with 7 druggable targets co-encoded at Chr6p21.1. Over-representation of immune pathway–associated genes supporting EAC cell growth included leukemia inhibitory factor, complement component 1, q subcomponent A chain (C1QA), and triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2 (TREM2), which were validated further as targets sharing downstream signaling pathways through genomic and pathologic studies. Finally, targeting the triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells 2-, C1q-, and leukemia inhibitory factor–activated signaling pathways (TYROBP–spleen tyrosine kinase and JAK-STAT3) with spleen tyrosine kinase and Janus-activated kinase inhibitor fostamatinib R788 triggered EAC cell death, growth arrest, and reduced tumor burden in NOD scid gamma mice.Conclusions:These data highlight a subset of genes co-identified through siRNA targeting and genomic studies of expression and somatic variation, specifically highlighting the contribution that immune-related fac

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Gaya M, Barral P, Burbage M, Aggarwal S, Montaner B, Warren Navia A, Aid M, Tsui C, Maldonado P, Nair U, Ghneim K, Fallon PG, Sekaly R-P, Barouch DH, Shalek AK, Bruckbauer A, Strid J, Batista FDet al., 2017, Initiation of Antiviral B Cell Immunity Relies on Innate Signals from Spatially Positioned NKT Cells., Cell, Vol: 172, Pages: 517-533.e20, ISSN: 0092-8674

B cells constitute an essential line of defense from pathogenic infections through the generation of class-switched antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) in germinal centers. Although this process is known to be regulated by follicular helper T (TfH) cells, the mechanism by which B cells initially seed germinal center reactions remains elusive. We found that NKT cells, a population of innate-like T lymphocytes, are critical for the induction of B cell immunity upon viral infection. The positioning of NKT cells at the interfollicular areas of lymph nodes facilitates both their direct priming by resident macrophages and the localized delivery of innate signals to antigen-experienced B cells. Indeed, NKT cells secrete an early wave of IL-4 and constitute up to 70% of the total IL-4-producing cells during the initial stages of infection. Importantly, the requirement of this innate immunity arm appears to be evolutionarily conserved because early NKT and IL-4 gene signatures also positively correlate with the levels of neutralizing antibodies in Zika-virus-infected macaques. In conclusion, our data support a model wherein a pre-TfH wave of IL-4 secreted by interfollicular NKT cells triggers the seeding of germinal center cells and serves as an innate link between viral infection and B cell immunity.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Silva-Santos B, Strid J, 2017, γδ T cells get adaptive., Nature Immunology, Vol: 18, Pages: 370-372, ISSN: 1529-2916

Throughout ontogeny, the γδ TCR repertoire in human blood becomes less diverse and more focused, yet is private in nature, and specific adult γδ T cell subsets undergo substantial clonal expansion after challenge with cytomegalovirus.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Giacomassi C, Ling GS, Buang N, Strid J, Botto Met al., 2016, Complement C3 Exacerbates TLR7-Mediated Skin Inflammation but Not Systemic Autoimmunity, Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR), Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Pages: 280-281, ISSN: 0003-4967

CONFERENCE PAPER

Giacomassi C, Buang N, Ling GS, Crawford G, Cook, Scott D, Dazzi F, Strid, Botto Met al., 2016, Complement C3 exacerbates imiquimod-induced skin inflammation and psoriasiform dermatitis, Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol: 137, Pages: 760-763, ISSN: 1523-1747

The complement system is pivotal in protection against pathogens, but also plays important roles in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses (Scott and Botto, 2015) and in modulating local and systemic inflammation (Markiewski and Lambris, 2007). Activation of complement occurs through three different pathways (classical, alternative and lectin), converges at C3 cleavage and culminates in the formation of the membrane attack complex. The anaphylotoxic fragments, C3a and C5a, generated during the proteolytic cascade, recruit immune cells that can promote the removal of debris and pathogens, but can also cause tissue damage (Markiewski and Lambris, 2007).

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hayes MD, Crawford G, Castro-Seoane R, Strid Jet al., 2016, IgE strongly promotes inflammation-driven skin carcinogenesis, Annual Meeting of the European-Society-for-Dermatological-Research (ESDR), Publisher: Elsevier, Pages: S211-S211, ISSN: 0022-202X

CONFERENCE PAPER

Dalessandri T, Crawford G, Hayes M, Castro Seoane R, Strid Jet al., 2016, IL-13 from intraepithelial lymphocytes regulates tissue homeostasis and protects against carcinogenesis in the skin, Nature Communications, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2041-1723

The skin is under constant renewal and exposure to environmental challenges. Howhomeostasis is maintained alongside protective mechanisms against damage is unclear.Among the basal epithelial cells (ECs) is a population of resident intraepithelial lymphocytes(IELs) that provide host-protective immune surveillance. Here we show that IELscross-communicate with ECs via the production of IL-13. Skin ECs are activated by IEL-derivedIL-13, enabling a canonical EC stress response. In the absence of IL-13, or canonical IEL, theskin has decreased ability to repair its barrier and increased susceptibility to cutaneouscarcinogenesis. IL-13 controls the rate of EC movement through the epidermis, which mightexplain the importance of IL-13 for epidermal integrity and its suppressive effect on skincarcinogenesis. These findings show that IL-13 acts as a molecular bridge between IELs andECs, and reveal a critical host-defensive role for type-2 immunity in regulating EC tissuehomeostasis and carcinogenesis.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid J, McLean WHI, Irvine AD, 2016, Too Much, Too Little or Just Enough: A Goldilocks Effect for IL-13 and Skin Barrier Regulation?, JOURNAL OF INVESTIGATIVE DERMATOLOGY, Vol: 136, Pages: 561-564, ISSN: 0022-202X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid J, McLean WH, Irvine AD, 2016, Too Much, Too Little or Just Enough: A Goldilocks Effect for IL-13 and Skin Barrier Regulation?, Journal of Investigative Dermatology, Vol: 136, Pages: 561-564, ISSN: 1523-1747

The mechanistic relationship between IL-4/IL-13 and skin barrier function has been of interest since the filaggrin discovery and the subsequent in vitro demonstration that IL-4 and IL-13 downregulate filaggrin expression in cultured keratinocytes. Hönzke and colleagues explore these interactions further. The effects of IL-4/ll-13 may be context dependent, with differing roles in homeostasis and in disease.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid J, 2015, Skin perturbations, stress surveillance and atopy, 51st Congress of the European-Societies-of-Toxicology (EUROTOX), Publisher: Elsevier, Pages: S42-S42, ISSN: 0378-4274

CONFERENCE PAPER

Crawford GH, Seoane RC, Strid J, 2014, Lymphoid stress-surveillance promotes protective IgE responses in the skin, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 143, Pages: 78-78, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dalessandri T, Seoane RC, Strid J, 2014, IL-13 has prominent effects on skin epithelia and significantly protects against cutaneous carcinogenesis, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 143, Pages: 109-109, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hayes M, Strid J, 2014, IgE effector cells accumulate in inflamed skin and IgE strongly promotes inflammation-driven skin carcinogenesis, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 143, Pages: 169-169, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Seoane RC, Crawford G, Strid J, 2014, The scope of skin-induced lymphoid stress-surveillance, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 143, Pages: 171-171, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Giacomassi C, Ling GS, Strid J, Dazzi F, Botto Met al., 2014, Complement C3 exacerbates skin inflammation in a murine model of imiquimod-induced psoriasis, IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 143, Pages: 120-120, ISSN: 0019-2805

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid KJ, Dalessandri T, 2014, Beneficial autoimmunity at body surfaces – immune surveillance and rapid type 2 immunity regulate tissue homeostasis and cancer, Frontiers in Immunology, Vol: 5, ISSN: 1664-3224

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Dalessandri T, Strid J, 2013, Epithelial stress and DNA- damage induce a rapid Type 2 immune response with high levels of IgE, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 31-31, ISSN: 0019-2805

CONFERENCE PAPER

Strid J, Sobolev O, Filler R, Girardi M, Hayday Aet al., 2012, Integration of pathways initiating early tumour-surveillance with atopic IgE responses, European Congress of Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 169-169, ISSN: 0019-2805

CONFERENCE PAPER

Strid J, 2012, The intraepithelial T cell response to NKG2D-ligands links lymphoid stress surveillance to atopy (December, pg 1293, 2011), SCIENCE, Vol: 335, Pages: 538-538, ISSN: 0036-8075

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid J, Sobolev O, Zafirova B, Polic B, Hayday Aet al., 2011, The intraepithelial T cell response to NKG2D-ligands links lymphoid stress surveillance to atopy, Science, Vol: 334, Pages: 1293-1297

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hunt B, Woolf R, Strid J, Hayday Aet al., 2011, Defining novel afferent signals in the lymphoid stress surveillance response, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 132-132, ISSN: 0019-2805

CONFERENCE PAPER

Sobolev O, Strid J, Hayday A, 2010, Local and systemic consequences of lymphoid stress-surveillance by gd T cells, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, Pages: 151-151, ISSN: 0019-2805

CONFERENCE PAPER

Hayday A, Turchinovich G, Michel M-L, Wencker M, Strid Jet al., 2010, The construction and operation of lymphoid stress-surveillance, Annual Congress of the British-Society-for-Immunology, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL PUBLISHING, INC, Pages: 27-27, ISSN: 0019-2805

CONFERENCE PAPER

Thompson RL, Miles LM, Lunn J, Devereux G, Dearman RJ, Strid J, Buttriss JLet al., 2010, Peanut sensitisation and allergy: influence of early life exposure to peanuts, BRITISH JOURNAL OF NUTRITION, Vol: 103, Pages: 1278-1286, ISSN: 0007-1145

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Thompson RL, Miles LM, Lunn J, Devereux G, Strid J, Buttriss JLet al., 2010, The impact of early-life exposure to food allergens on the subsequent development of sensitisation and allergy to foods, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NUTRITION SOCIETY, Vol: 69, Pages: E118-E118, ISSN: 0029-6651

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Zinelli C, Caffarelli C, Strid J, Jaffe A, Atherton DJet al., 2009, Measurement of nitric oxide and 8-isoprostane in exhaled breath of children with atopic eczema, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL DERMATOLOGY, Vol: 34, Pages: 607-612, ISSN: 0307-6938

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Strid J, Tigelaar RE, Hayday AC, 2009, Skin immune surveillance by T cells-A new order?, SEMINARS IN IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 21, Pages: 110-120, ISSN: 1044-5323

JOURNAL ARTICLE

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