Imperial College London

DrJosephTobias

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Reader in Biodiversity and Ecosystems
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1059j.tobias

 
 
//

Location

 

KennedySilwood Park

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

107 results found

Ulrich W, Banks-Leite C, De Coster G, Habel JC, Matheve H, Newmark WD, Tobias JA, Lens Let al., 2017, Environmentally and behaviourally mediated co-occurrence of functional traits in bird communities of tropical forest fragments, Oikos, Vol: 127, Pages: 274-284, ISSN: 0030-1299

Two major theories of community assembly - based on the assumption of 'limiting similarity' or 'habitat filtering', respectively - predict contrasting patterns in the spatial arrangement of functional traits. Previous analyses have made progress in testing these predictions and identifying underlying processes, but have also pointed to theoretical as well as methodological shortcomings. Here we applied a recently developed methodology for spatially explicit analysis of phylogenetic meta-community structure to study the pattern of co-occurrence of functional traits in Afrotropical and Neotropical bird species inhabiting forest fragments. Focusing separately on locomotory, dietary, and dispersal traits, we tested whether environmental filtering causes spatial clustering, or competition leads to spatial segregation as predicted by limiting similarity theory. We detected significant segregation of species co-occurrences in African fragments, but not in the Neotropical ones. Interspecific competition had a higher impact on trait co-occurrence than filter effects, yet no single functional trait was able to explain the observed degree of spatial segregation among species. Despite high regional variability spanning from spatial segregation to aggregation, we found a consistent tendency for a clustered spatial patterning of functional traits among communities in fragmented landscapes, particularly in non-territorial species. Overall, we show that behavioural effects, such as territoriality, and environmental effects, such as the area of forest remnants or properties of the landscape matrix in which they are embedded, can strongly affect the pattern of trait co-occurrence. Our findings suggest that trait-based analyses of community structure should include behavioural and environmental covariates, and we here provide an appropriate method for linking functional traits, species ecology and environmental conditions to clarify the drivers underlying spatial patterns of species c

Journal article

Thaxter CB, Buchanan GM, Carr J, Butchart SHM, Newbold T, Green RE, Tobias JA, Foden WB, O'Brien S, Pearce-Higgins JWet al., 2017, Bird and bat species' global vulnerability to collision mortality at wind farms revealed through a trait-based assessment, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 284, ISSN: 1471-2954

Mitigation of anthropogenic climate change involves deployments of renewableenergy worldwide, including wind farms, which can pose a significantcollision risk to volant animals. Most studies into the collision risk betweenspecies and wind turbines, however, have taken place in industrializedcountries. Potential effects for many locations and species therefore remainunclear. To redress this gap, we conducted a systematic literature reviewof recorded collisions between birds and bats and wind turbines withindeveloped countries. We related collision rate to species-level traits and turbinecharacteristics to quantify the potential vulnerability of 9538 bird and888 bat species globally. Avian collision rate was affected by migratory strategy,dispersal distance and habitat associations, and bat collision rates wereinfluenced by dispersal distance. For birds and bats, larger turbine capacity(megawatts) increased collision rates; however, deploying a smaller numberof large turbines with greater energy output reduced total collision risk perunit energy output, although bat mortality increased again with the largestturbines. Areas with high concentrations of vulnerable species were alsoidentified, including migration corridors. Our results can therefore guidewind farm design and location to reduce the risk of large-scale animal mortality.This is the first quantitative global assessment of the relative collisionvulnerability of species groups with wind turbines, providing valuable guidancefor minimizing potentially serious negative impacts on biodiversity.

Journal article

Grether GF, Peiman KS, Tobias JA, Robinson BWet al., 2017, Causes and Consequences of Behavioral Interference between Species., Trends in Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 32, Pages: 760-772, ISSN: 1872-8383

Behavioral interference between species, such as territorial aggression, courtship, and mating, is widespread in animals. While aggressive and reproductive forms of interspecific interference have generally been studied separately, their many parallels and connections warrant a unified conceptual approach. Substantial evidence exists that aggressive and reproductive interference have pervasive effects on species coexistence, range limits, and evolutionary processes, including divergent and convergent forms of character displacement. Alien species invasions and climate change-induced range shifts result in novel interspecific interactions, heightening the importance of predicting the consequences of species interactions, and behavioral interference is a fundamental but neglected part of the equation. Here, we outline priorities for further theoretical and empirical research on the ecological and evolutionary consequences of behavioral interference.

Journal article

Stoddard MC, Yong EH, Akkaynak D, Sheard C, Tobias JA, Mahadevan Let al., 2017, Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution, Science, Vol: 356, Pages: 1249-1254, ISSN: 0036-8075

Avian egg shape is generally explained as an adaptation to life history, yet we currently lack a global synthesis of how egg-shape differences arise and evolve. Here, we apply morphometric, mechanistic, and macroevolutionary analyses to the egg shapes of 1400 bird species. We characterize egg-shape diversity in terms of two biologically relevant variables, asymmetry and ellipticity, allowing us to quantify the observed morphologies in a two-dimensional morphospace. We then propose a simple mechanical model that explains the observed egg-shape diversity based on geometric and material properties of the egg membrane. Finally, using phylogenetic models, we show that egg shape correlates with flight ability on broad taxonomic scales, suggesting that adaptations for flight may have been critical drivers of egg-shape variation in birds.

Journal article

Cooney CR, Tobias JA, Weir JT, Botero CA, Seddon Net al., 2017, Sexual selection, speciation and constraints on geographical range overlap in birds, Ecology Letters, Vol: 20, Pages: 863-871, ISSN: 1461-023X

The role of sexual selection as a driver of speciation remains unresolved, not least because we lack a clear empirical understanding of its influence on different phases of the speciation process. Here, using data from 1306 recent avian speciation events, we show that plumage dichromatism (a proxy for sexual selection) does not predict diversification rates, but instead explains the rate at which young lineages achieve geographical range overlap. Importantly, this effect is only significant when range overlap is narrow (< 20%). These findings are consistent with a ‘differential fusion’ model wherein sexual selection reduces rates of fusion among lineages undergoing secondary contact, facilitating parapatry or limited co-existence, whereas more extensive sympatry is contingent on additional factors such as ecological differentiation. Our results provide a more mechanistic explanation for why sexual selection appears to drive early stages of speciation while playing a seemingly limited role in determining broad-scale patterns of diversification.

Journal article

Bath E, Bowden S, Peters C, Reddy A, Tobias JA, Easton-Calabria E, Seddon N, Goodwin SF, Wigby Set al., 2017, Sperm and sex peptide stimulate aggression in female Drosophila, Nature Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 1, ISSN: 2397-334X

Female aggression towards other females is associated with reproduction in many taxa, and traditionally thought to be related to the protection or provisioning of offspring, such as through increased resource acquisition. However, the underlying reproductive factors causing aggressive behaviour in females remain unknown. Here we show that female aggression in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is strongly stimulated by the receipt of sperm at mating, and in part by an associated seminal fluid protein, the sex peptide. We further show that the post-mating increase in female aggression is decoupled from the costs of egg production and from post-mating decreases in sexual receptivity. Our results suggest that male ejaculates can have a surprisingly direct influence on aggression in recipient females. Male ejaculate traits thus influence the female social competitive environment with potentially far-reaching ecological and evolutionary consequences.

Journal article

Hosner PA, Tobias JA, Braun EL, Kimball RTet al., 2017, How do seemingly non-vagile clades accomplish trans-marine dispersal? Trait and dispersal evolution in the landfowl (Ayes: Galliformes), Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 284, ISSN: 0962-8452

Dispersal ability is a key factor in determining insular distributions and island community composition, yet non-vagile terrestrial organisms widely occur on oceanic islands. The landfowl (pheasants, partridges, grouse, turkeys, quails and relatives) are generally poor dispersers, but the Old World quail (Coturnix) are a notable exception. These birds evolved small body sizes and high-aspect-ratio wing shapes, and hence are capable of trans-continental migrations and trans-oceanic colonization. Two monotypic partridge genera, Margaroperdix of Madagascar and Anurophasis of alpine New Guinea, may represent additional examples of trans-marine dispersal in landfowl, but their body size and wing shape are typical of poorly dispersive continental species. Here, we estimate historical relationships of quail and their relatives using phylogenomics, and infer body size and wing shape evolution in relation to trans-marine dispersal events. Our results show that Margaroperdix and Anurophasis are nested within the Coturnix quail, and are each ‘island giants’ that independently evolved from dispersive, Coturnix-like ancestral populations that colonized and were subsequently isolated on Madagascar and New Guinea. This evolutionary cycle of gain and loss of dispersal ability, coupled with extinction of dispersive taxa, can result in the false appearance that non-vagile taxa somehow underwent rare oceanic dispersal.

Journal article

Fecchio A, Svensson-Coelho M, Bell J, Ellis VA, Medeiros MC, Trisos CH, Blake JG, Loiselle BA, Tobias JA, Fanti R, Coffey ED, De Faria IP, Pinho JB, Felix G, Braga EM, Anciaes M, Tkach V, Bates J, Witt C, Weckstein JD, Ricklefs RE, Farias IPet al., 2017, Host associations and turnover of haemosporidian parasites in manakins (Aves: Pipridae), Parasitology, Vol: 144, Pages: 984-993, ISSN: 0031-1820

Parasites of the genera Plasmodium and Haemoproteus (Apicomplexa: Haemosporida) are a diverse group of pathogens that infect birds nearly worldwide. Despite their ubiquity, the ecological and evolutionary factors that shape the diversity and distribution of these protozoan parasites among avian communities and geographic regions are poorly understood. Based on a survey throughout the Neotropics of the haemosporidian parasites infecting manakins (Pipridae), a family of Passerine birds endemic to this region, we asked whether host relatedness, ecological similarity and geographic proximity structure parasite turnover between manakin species and local manakin assemblages. We used molecular methods to screen 1343 individuals of 30 manakin species for the presence of parasites. We found no significant correlations between manakin parasite lineage turnover and both manakin species turnover and geographic distance. Climate differences, species turnover in the larger bird community and parasite lineage turnover in non-manakin hosts did not correlate with manakin parasite lineage turnover. We also found no evidence that manakin parasite lineage turnover among host species correlates with range overlap and genetic divergence among hosts. Our analyses indicate that host switching (turnover among host species) and dispersal (turnover among locations) of haemosporidian parasites in manakins are not constrained at this scale.

Journal article

Mason NA, Burns KJ, Tobias JA, Claramunt S, Seddon N, Derryberry EPet al., 2017, Song evolution, speciation, and vocal learning in passerine birds, Evolution, Vol: 71, Pages: 786-796, ISSN: 0014-3820

Phenotypic divergence can promote reproductive isolation and speciation, suggesting a possible link between rates of phenotypic evolution and the tempo of speciation at multiple evolutionary scales. To date, most macroevolutionary studies of diversification have focused on morphological traits, whereas behavioral traits─including vocal signals─are rarely considered. Thus, although behavioral traits often mediate mate choice and gene flow, we have a limited understanding of how behavioral evolution contributes to diversification. Furthermore, the developmental mode by which behavioral traits are acquired may affect rates of behavioral evolution, although this hypothesis is seldom tested in a phylogenetic framework. Here, we examine evidence for rate shifts in vocal evolution and speciation across two major radiations of codistributed passerines: one oscine clade with learned songs (Thraupidae) and one suboscine clade with innate songs (Furnariidae). We find that evolutionary bursts in rates of speciation and song evolution are coincident in both thraupids and furnariids. Further, overall rates of vocal evolution are higher among taxa with learned rather than innate songs. Taken together, these findings suggest an association between macroevolutionary bursts in speciation and vocal evolution, and that the tempo of behavioral evolution can be influenced by variation in developmental modes among lineages.

Journal article

Bregman TP, Lees AC, MacGregor HEA, Darski B, de Moura NG, Aleixo A, Barlow J, Tobias JAet al., 2016, Using avian functional traits to assess the impact of land-cover change on ecosystem processes linked to resilience in tropical forests., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

Vertebrates perform key roles in ecosystem processes via trophic interactions with plants and insects, but the response of these interactions to environmental change is difficult to quantify in complex systems, such as tropical forests. Here, we use the functional trait structure of Amazonian forest bird assemblages to explore the impacts of land-cover change on two ecosystem processes: seed dispersal and insect predation. We show that trait structure in assemblages of frugivorous and insectivorous birds remained stable after primary forests were subjected to logging and fire events, but that further intensification of human land use substantially reduced the functional diversity and dispersion of traits, and resulted in communities that occupied a different region of trait space. These effects were only partially reversed in regenerating secondary forests. Our findings suggest that local extinctions caused by the loss and degradation of tropical forest are non-random with respect to functional traits, thus disrupting the network of trophic interactions regulating seed dispersal by forest birds and herbivory by insects, with important implications for the structure and resilience of human-modified tropical forests. Furthermore, our results illustrate how quantitative functional traits for specific guilds can provide a range of metrics for estimating the contribution of biodiversity to ecosystem processes, and the response of such processes to land-cover change.

Journal article

Pigot AL, Bregman T, Sheard C, Daly B, Etienne RS, Tobias JAet al., 2016, Quantifying species contributions to ecosystem processes: a global assessment of functional trait and phylogenetic metrics across avian seed-dispersal networks, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

Quantifying the role of biodiversity in ecosystems not only requires understanding the links between species and the ecological functions and services they provide, but also how these factors relate to measurable indices, such as functional traits and phylogenetic diversity. However, these relationships remain poorly understood, especially for heterotrophic organisms within complex ecological networks. Here, we assemble data on avian traits across a global sample of mutualistic plant–frugivore networks to critically assess how the functional roles of frugivores are associated with their intrinsic traits, as well as their evolutionary and functional distinctiveness. We find strong evidence for niche complementarity, with phenotypically and phylogenetically distinct birds interacting with more unique sets of plants. However, interaction strengths—the number of plant species dependent on a frugivore—were unrelated to evolutionary or functional distinctiveness, largely because distinct frugivores tend to be locally rare, and thus have fewer connections across the network. Instead, interaction strengths were better predicted by intrinsic traits, including body size, gape width and dietary specialization. Our analysis provides general support for the use of traits in quantifying species ecological functions, but also highlights the need to go beyond simple metrics of functional or phylogenetic diversity to consider the multiple pathways through which traits may determine ecological processes.

Journal article

Seddon N, Mace GM, Naeem S, Tobias JA, Pigot AL, Cavanagh R, Mouillot D, Vause J, Walpole Met al., 2016, Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

Meeting the ever-increasing needs of the Earth’s human population without excessively reducing biological diversity is one of the greatest challenges facing humanity, suggesting that new approaches to biodiversity conservation are required. One idea rapidly gaining momentum—as well as opposition—is to incorporate the values of biodiversity into decision-making using economic methods. Here, we develop several lines of argument for how biodiversity might be valued, building on recent developments in natural science, economics and science-policy processes. Then we provide a synoptic guide to the papers in this special feature, summarizing recent research advances relevant to biodiversity valuation and management. Current evidence suggests that more biodiverse systems have greater stability and resilience, and that by maximizing key components of biodiversity we maximize an ecosystem’s long-term value. Moreover, many services and values arising from biodiversity are interdependent, and often poorly captured by standard economic models. We conclude that economic valuation approaches to biodiversity conservation should (i) account for interdependency and (ii) complement rather than replace traditional approaches. To identify possible solutions, we present a framework for understanding the foundational role of hard-to-quantify ‘biodiversity services’ in sustaining the value of ecosystems to humanity, and then use this framework to highlight new directions for pure and applied research. In most cases, clarifying the links between biodiversity and ecosystem services, and developing effective policy and practice for managing biodiversity, will require a genuinely interdisciplinary approach.

Journal article

Ulrich W, Lens L, Tobias JA, Habel JCet al., 2016, Contrasting patterns of species richness and functional diversity in bird communities of East African cloud forest fragments, PLOS One, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1932-6203

Rapid fragmentation and degradation of large undisturbed habitats constitute major threats to biodiversity. Several studies have shown that populations in small and highly isolated habitat patches are prone to strong environmental and demographic stochasticity and increased risk of extinction. Based on community assembly theory, we predict recent rapid forest fragmentation to cause a decline in species and functional guild richness of forest birds combined with a high species turnover among habitat patches, and well defined dominance structures, if competition is the major driver of community assembly. To test these predictions, we analysed species co-occurrence, nestedness, and competitive strength to infer effects of interspecific competition, habitat structure, and species′ traits on the assembly of bird species communities from 12 cloud forest fragments in southern Kenya. Our results do not point to a single ecological driver of variation in species composition. Interspecific competition does not appear to be a major driver of species segregation in small forest patches, while its relative importance appears to be higher in larger ones, which may be indicative for a generic shift from competition-dominated to colonisation-driven community structure with decreasing fragment size. Functional trait diversity was independent of fragment size after controlling for species richness. As fragmentation effects vary among feeding guilds and habitat generalists, in particular, tend to decline in low quality forest patches, we plead for taking species ecology fully into account when predicting tropical community responses to habitat change.

Journal article

Tobias JA, Sheard C, Seddon N, Meade A, Cotton AJ, Nakagawa Set al., 2016, Territoriality, social bonds, and the evolution of communal signaling in birds, Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2296-701X

Communal signaling—wherein males and females collaborate to produce joint visual or acoustic displays—is perhaps the most complex and least understood form of communication in social animals. Although many communal signals appear to mediate competitive interactions within and between coalitions of individuals, previous studies have highlighted a confusing array of social and environmental factors that may explain the evolution of these displays, and we still lack the global synthesis needed to understand why communal signals are distributed so unevenly across large taxonomic and geographic scales. Here, we use Bayesian phylogenetic models to test whether acoustic communal signals (duets and choruses) are explained by a range of life-history and environmental variables across 10328 bird species worldwide. We estimate that duets and choruses occur in 1830 (18%) species in our sample and are thus considerably more widespread than previously thought. We then show that global patterns in duetting and chorusing, including evolutionary transitions between communal signaling and solo signaling, are not explained by latitude, migration, climate, or habitat, and only weakly correlated with cooperative breeding. Instead, they are most strongly associated with year-round territoriality, typically in conjunction with stable social bonds. Our results suggest that the evolution of communal signals is associated with the coordinated defense of ecological resources by stable coalitions of males and females, and that other widely reported associations are largely by-products of this underlying trend.

Journal article

Cooney CR, Seddon N, Tobias JA, 2016, Widespread correlations between climatic niche evolution and species diversification in birds, Journal of Animal Ecology, Vol: 85, Pages: 869-878, ISSN: 1365-2656

1.The adaptability of species' climatic niches can influence the dynamics of colonisation and gene flow across climatic gradients, potentially increasing the likelihood of speciation, or reducing extinction in the face of environmental change. However, previous comparative studies have tested these ideas using geographically, taxonomically and ecologically restricted samples, yielding mixed results, and thus the processes linking climatic niche evolution with diversification remain poorly understood. 2.Focusing on birds, the largest and most widespread class of terrestrial vertebrates, we test whether variation in species diversification among clades is correlated with rates of climatic niche evolution, and the extent to which these patterns are modified by underlying gradients in biogeography and species' ecology. 3.We quantified climatic niches, latitudinal distribution and ecological traits for 7657 (~75%) bird species based on geographical range polygons, and then used Bayesian phylogenetic analyses to test whether niche evolution was related to species richness and rates of diversification across genus and family-level clades. 4.We found that the rate of climatic niche evolution has a positive linear relationship with both species richness and diversification rate at two different taxonomic levels (genus and family). Furthermore, this positive association between labile climatic niches and diversification was detected regardless of variation in clade latitude or key ecological traits. 5.Our findings suggest either that rapid adaptation to unoccupied areas of climatic niche space promotes avian diversification, or that diversification promotes adaptation. Either way, we propose that climatic niche evolution is a fundamental process regulating the link between climate and biodiversity at global scales, irrespective of the geographical and ecological context of speciation and extinction. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Pigot AL, Tobias JA, Jetz W, 2016, Energetic Constraints on Species Coexistence in Birds, PLoS Biology, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1544-9173

© 2016 Pigot et al. The association between species richness and ecosystem energy availability is one of the major geographic trends in biodiversity. It is often explained in terms of energetic constraints, such that coexistence among competing species is limited in low productivity environments. However, it has proven challenging to reject alternative views, including the null hypothesis that species richness has simply had more time to accumulate in productive regions, and thus the role of energetic constraints in limiting coexistence remains largely unknown. We use the phylogenetic relationships and geographic ranges of sister species (pairs of lineages who are each other’s closest extant relatives) to examine the association between energy availability and coexistence across an entire vertebrate class (Aves). We show that the incidence of coexistence among sister species increases with overall species richness and is elevated in more productive ecosystems, even when accounting for differences in the evolutionary time available for coexistence to occur. Our results indicate that energy availability promotes species coexistence in closely related lineages, providing a key step toward a more mechanistic understanding of the productivity–richness relationship underlying global gradients in biodiversity.

Journal article

Collar NJ, Fishpool LDC, del Hoyo J, Pilgrim JD, Seddon N, Spottiswoode CN, Tobias JAet al., 2016, Toward a scoring system for species delimitation: a response to Remsen, Journal of Field Ornithology, Vol: 87, Pages: 104-115, ISSN: 1557-9263

Journal article

Pigot AL, Trisos CH, Tobias JA, 2016, Functional traits reveal the expansion and packing of ecological niche space underlying an elevational diversity gradient in passerine birds, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

Journal article

Bregman TP, Lees AC, Seddon N, MacGregor HEA, Darski B, Aleixo A, Bonsall MB, Tobias JAet al., 2015, Species interactions regulate the collapse of biodiversity and ecosystem function in tropical forest fragments, Ecology, Vol: 96, Pages: 2692-2704, ISSN: 1939-9170

Competitive interactions among species with similar ecological niches are known to regulate the assembly of biological communities. However, it is not clear whether such forms of competition can predict the collapse of communities and associated shifts in ecosystem function in the face of environmental change. Here, we use phylogenetic and functional trait data to test whether communities of two ecologically important guilds of tropical birds (frugivores and insectivores) are structured by species interactions in a fragmented Amazonian forest landscape. In both guilds, we found that forest patch size, quality, and degree of isolation influence the phylogenetic and functional trait structure of communities, with small, degraded, or isolated forest patches having an increased signature of competition (i.e., phylogenetic and functional trait overdispersion in relation to null models). These results suggest that local extinctions in the context of fragmentation are nonrandom, with a consistent bias toward more densely occupied regions of niche space. We conclude that the loss of biodiversity in fragmented landscapes is mediated by niche-based competitive interactions among species, with potentially far-reaching implications for key ecosystem processes, including seed dispersal and plant damage by phytophagous insects.

Journal article

Tobias JA, 2015, BIODIVERSITY Hidden impacts of logging, NATURE, Vol: 523, Pages: 163-164, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Matthews TJ, Sheard C, -Jones HEWC, Bregman TP, Tobias JA, Whittaker RJet al., 2015, Ecological traits reveal functional nestedness of bird communities in habitat islands: a global survey, OIKOS, Vol: 124, Pages: 817-826, ISSN: 0030-1299

Journal article

Bath E, Wigby S, Vincent C, Tobias JA, Seddon Net al., 2015, Condition, not eyespan, predicts contest outcome in female stalk-eyed flies, Teleopsis dalmanni, Ecology and Evolution, Vol: 5, Pages: 1826-1836, ISSN: 2045-7758

In contests among males, body condition is often the key determinant of a successful outcome, with fighting ability signaled by so-called armaments, that is, exaggerated, condition-dependent traits. However, it is not known whether condition and exaggerated traits function in the same way in females. Here, we manipulated adult condition by varying larval nutrition in the stalk-eyed fly, Teleopsis dalmanni, a species in which eyespan is exaggerated in both sexes, and we measured the outcome of contests between females of similar or different body condition and relative eyespan. We found that females in higher condition, with both larger bodies and eyespan, won a higher proportion of encounters when competing against rivals of lower condition. However, when females were of equal condition, neither eyespan nor body length had an effect on the outcome of a contest. An analysis of previously published data revealed a similar pattern in males: individuals with large relative eyespan did not win significantly more encounters when competing with individuals of a similar body size. Contrary to expectations, and to previous findings in males, there was no clear effect of differences in body size or eyespan affecting contest duration in females. Taken together, our findings suggest that although eyespan can provide an honest indicator of condition, large eyespans provide no additional benefit to either sex in intrasexual aggressive encounters; body size is instead the most important factor.

Journal article

Pigot AL, Tobias JA, 2015, Dispersal and the transition to sympatry in vertebrates, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 282, ISSN: 0962-8452

Journal article

Trisos CH, Petchey OL, Tobias JA, 2014, Unraveling the Interplay of Community Assembly Processes Acting on Multiple Niche Axes across Spatial Scales, AMERICAN NATURALIST, Vol: 184, Pages: 593-608, ISSN: 0003-0147

Journal article

Edwards DP, Tobias JA, Sheil D, Meijaard E, Laurance WFet al., 2014, Maintaining ecosystem function and services in logged tropical forests, TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 29, Pages: 511-520, ISSN: 0169-5347

Journal article

Fayet AL, Tobias JA, Hintzen RE, Seddon Net al., 2014, Immigration and dispersal are key determinants of cultural diversity in a songbird population, BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 744-753, ISSN: 1045-2249

Journal article

Touchton JM, Seddon N, Tobias JA, 2014, Captive Rearing Experiments Confirm Song Development without Learning in a Tracheophone Suboscine Bird, PLOS One, Vol: 9, ISSN: 1932-6203

The origin of vocal learning in animals has long been the subject of debate, but progress has been limited by uncertainty regarding the distribution of learning mechanisms across the tree of life, even for model systems such as birdsong. In particular, the importance of learning is well known in oscine songbirds, but disputed in suboscines. Members of this diverse group (∼1150 species) are generally assumed not to learn their songs, but empirical evidence is scarce, with previous studies restricted to the bronchophone (non-tracheophone) clade. Here, we conduct the first experimental study of song development in a tracheophone suboscine bird by rearing spotted antbird (Hylophylax naevioides) chicks in soundproofed aviaries. Individuals were raised either in silence with no tutor or exposed to standardized playback of a heterospecific tutor. All individuals surviving to maturity took a minimum of 79 days to produce a crystallized version of adult song, which in all cases was indistinguishable from wild song types of their own species. These first insights into song development in tracheophone suboscines suggest that adult songs are innate rather than learnt. Given that empirical evidence for song learning in suboscines is restricted to polygamous and lek-mating species, whereas tracheophone suboscines are mainly monogamous with long-term social bonds, our results are consistent with the view that sexual selection promotes song learning in birds.

Journal article

Tobias JA, Cornwallis CK, Derryberry EP, Claramunt S, Brumfield RT, Seddon Net al., 2014, Species coexistence and the dynamics of phenotypic evolution in adaptive radiation, NATURE, Vol: 506, Pages: 359-+, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Tobias JA, Planque R, Cram DL, Seddon Net al., 2014, Species interactions and the structure of complex communication networks, PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Vol: 111, Pages: 1020-1025, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Bregman TP, Sekercioglu CH, Tobias JA, 2014, Global patterns and predictors of bird species responses to forest fragmentation: Implications for ecosystem function and conservation, BIOLOGICAL CONSERVATION, Vol: 169, Pages: 372-383, ISSN: 0006-3207

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: limit=30&id=00860179&person=true&page=2&respub-action=search.html