Imperial College London

DrJosephTobias

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Reader in Biodiversity and Ecosystems
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1059j.tobias

 
 
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Location

 

KennedySilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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94 results found

Kirschel ANG, Seddon N, Tobias JA, 2019, Range-wide spatial mapping reveals convergent character displacement of bird song, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 286, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cannon PG, Gilroy JJ, Tobias JA, Anderson A, Haugaasen T, Edwards DPet al., 2019, Land-sparing agriculture sustains higher levels of avian functional diversity than land sharing, Global Change Biology, Vol: 25, Pages: 1576-1590, ISSN: 1354-1013

The ecological impacts of meeting rising demands for food production can potentially be mitigated by two competing land-use strategies: off-setting natural habitats through intensification of existing farmland (land sparing), or elevating biodiversity within the agricultural matrix via the integration of 'wildlife-friendly' habitat features (land sharing). However, a key unanswered question is whether sparing or sharing farming would best conserve functional diversity, which can promote ecosystem stability and resilience to future land-use change. Focusing on bird communities in tropical cloud forests of the Colombian Andes, we test the performance of each strategy in conserving functional diversity. We show that multiple components of avian functional diversity in farmland are positively related to the proximity and extent of natural forest. Using landscape and community simulations, we also show that land-sparing agriculture conserves greater functional diversity and predicts higher abundance of species supplying key ecological functions than land sharing, with sharing becoming progressively inferior with increasing isolation from remnant forest. These results suggest low-intensity agriculture is likely to conserve little functional diversity unless large blocks of adjacent natural habitat are protected, consistent with land sparing. To ensure the retention of functionally diverse ecosystems, we urgently need to implement mechanisms for increasing farmland productivity whilst protecting spared land. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Felice RN, Tobias JA, Goswami A, 2019, How Dietary Niche Shapes Macroevolution in the Avian Skull, Annual Meeting of the Society-for-Integrative-and-Comparative-Biology (SICB), Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS INC, Pages: E68-E68, ISSN: 1540-7063

CONFERENCE PAPER

Mayhew RJ, Tobias JA, Bunnefeld L, Dent DHet al., 2019, Connectivity with primary forest determines the value of secondary tropical forests for bird conservation, Biotropica, Vol: 51, Pages: 219-233, ISSN: 0006-3606

Species extinctions caused by the destruction and degradation of tropical primary forest may be at least partially mitigated by the expansion of regenerating secondary forest. However, the conservation value of secondary forest remains controversial, and potentially underestimated, since most previous studies have focused on young, single-aged, or isolated stands. Here, we use point-count surveys to compare tropical forest bird communities in 20–120-year-old secondary forest with primary forest stands in central Panama, with varying connectivity between secondary forest sites and extensive primary forest. We found that species richness and other metrics of ecological diversity, as well as the combined population density of all birds, reached a peak in younger (20-year-old) secondary forests and appeared to decline in older secondary forest stands. This counter-intuitive result can be explained by the greater connectivity between younger secondary forests and extensive primary forests at our study site, compared with older secondary forests that are either (a) more isolated or (b) connected to primary forests that are themselves small and isolated. Our results suggest that connectivity with extensive primary forest is a more important determinant of avian species richness and community structure than forest age, and highlight the vital contribution secondary forests can make in conserving tropical bird diversity, so long as extensive primary habitats are adjacent and spatially connected.Abstract in Spanish is available with online material.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Felice RN, Tobias JA, Pigot AL, Goswami Aet al., 2019, Dietary niche and the evolution of cranial morphology in birds, Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 286, ISSN: 1471-2954

Cranial morphology in birds is thought to be shaped by adaptive evolution for foraging performance. This understanding of ecomorphological evolution is supported by observations of avian island radiations, such as Darwin’s finches, which display rapid evolution of skull shape in response to food resource availability and a strong fit between cranial phenotype and trophic ecology. However, a recent analysis of larger clades has suggested that diet is not necessarily a primary driver of cranial shape and that phylogeny and allometry are more significant factors in skull evolution. We use phenome-scale morphometric data across the breadth of extant bird diversity to test the influence of diet and foraging behaviour in shaping cranial evolution. We demonstrate that these trophic characters are significant but very weak predictors of cranial form at this scale. However, dietary groups exhibit significantly different rates of morphological evolution across multiple cranial regions. Granivores and nectarivores exhibit the highest rates of evolution in the face and cranial vault, whereas terrestrial carnivores evolve the slowest. The basisphenoid, occipital, and jaw joint regions have less extreme differences among dietary groups. These patterns demonstrate that dietary niche shapes the tempo and mode of phenotypic evolution in deep time, despite a weaker than expected form–function relationship across large clades.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Santini L, Butchart SHM, Rondinini C, Benítez-López A, Hilbers JP, Schipper AM, Cengic M, Tobias JA, Huijbregts MAJet al., 2019, Applying habitat and population-density models to land-cover time series to inform IUCN Red List assessments., Conserv Biol

The IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature) Red List categories and criteria are the most widely used framework for assessing the relative extinction risk of species. The criteria are based on quantitative thresholds relating to the size, trends, and structure of species' distributions and populations. However, data on these parameters are sparse and uncertain for many species and unavailable for others, potentially leading to their misclassification or classification as data deficient. We devised an approach that combines data on land-cover change, species-specific habitat preferences, population abundance, and dispersal distance to estimate key parameters (extent of occurrence, maximum area of occupancy, population size and trend, and degree of fragmentation) and hence predict IUCN Red List categories for species. We applied our approach to nonpelagic birds and terrestrial mammals globally (∼15,000 species). The predicted categories were fairly consistent with published IUCN Red List assessments, but more optimistic overall. We predicted 4.2% of species (467 birds and 143 mammals) to be more threatened than currently assessed and 20.2% of data deficient species (10 birds and 114 mammals) to be at risk of extinction. Incorporating the habitat fragmentation subcriterion reduced these predictions 1.5-2.3% and 6.4-14.9% (depending on the quantitative definition of fragmentation) for threatened and data deficient species, respectively, highlighting the need for improved guidance for IUCN Red List assessors on the application of this aspect of the IUCN Red List criteria. Our approach complements traditional methods of estimating parameters for IUCN Red List assessments. Furthermore, it readily provides an early-warning system to identify species potentially warranting changes in their extinction-risk category based on periodic updates of land-cover information. Given our method relies on optimistic assumptions about species distribution and abundance

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cooney CR, MacGregor HEA, Seddon N, Tobias JAet al., 2018, Multi-modal signal evolution in birds: re-examining a standard proxy for sexual selection, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 285, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Fecchio A, Bell JA, Collins MD, Farias IP, Trisos CH, Tobias JA, Tkach VV, Weckstein JD, Ricklefs RE, Batalha-Filho Het al., 2018, Diversification by host switching and dispersal shaped the diversity and distribution of avian malaria parasites in Amazonia, OIKOS, Vol: 127, Pages: 1233-1242, ISSN: 0030-1299

JOURNAL ARTICLE

McEntee JP, Tobias JA, Sheard C, Burleigh JGet al., 2018, Tempo and timing of ecological trait divergence in bird speciation, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 2, Pages: 1120-+, ISSN: 2397-334X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Chapman PM, Tobias JA, Edwards DP, Davies RGet al., 2018, Contrasting impacts of land-use change on phylogenetic and functional diversity of tropical forest birds, JOURNAL OF APPLIED ECOLOGY, Vol: 55, Pages: 1604-1614, ISSN: 0021-8901

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pigot AL, Jetz W, Sheard C, Tobias JAet al., 2018, The macroecological dynamics of species coexistence in birds, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 2, Pages: 1112-+, ISSN: 2397-334X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bovo AAA, Ferraz KMPMB, Magioli M, Alexandrino ER, Hasui E, Ribeiro MC, Tobias JAet al., 2018, Habitat fragmentation narrows the distribution of avian functional traits associated with seed dispersal in tropical forest, PERSPECTIVES IN ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION, Vol: 16, Pages: 90-96, ISSN: 2530-0644

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Howard C, Stephens PA, Tobias JA, Sheard C, Butchart SHM, Willis SGet al., 2018, Flight range, fuel load and the impact of climate change on the journeys of migrant birds, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 285, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ulrich W, Banks-Leite C, De Coster G, Habel JC, Matheve H, Newmark WD, Tobias JA, Lens Let al., 2018, Environmentally and behaviourally mediated co-occurrence of functional traits in bird communities of tropical forest fragments, OIKOS, Vol: 127, Pages: 274-284, ISSN: 0030-1299

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Derryberry EP, Seddon N, Derryberry GE, Claramunt S, Seeholzer GF, Brumfield RT, Tobias JAet al., 2018, Ecological drivers of song evolution in birds: Disentangling the effects of habitat and morphology, ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 8, Pages: 1890-1905, ISSN: 2045-7758

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Drury JP, Tobias JA, Burns KJ, Mason NA, Shultz AJ, Morlon Het al., 2018, Contrasting impacts of competition on ecological and social trait evolution in songbirds, PLOS BIOLOGY, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1545-7885

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hatfield JH, Orme CDL, Tobias JA, Banks-Leite Cet al., 2018, Trait-based indicators of bird species sensitivity to habitat loss are effective within but not across data sets, ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS, Vol: 28, Pages: 28-34, ISSN: 1051-0761

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Waldron A, Miller DC, Redding D, Mooers A, Kuhn TS, Nibbelink N, Roberts JT, Tobias JA, Gittleman JLet al., 2017, Reductions in global biodiversity loss predicted from conservation spending, NATURE, Vol: 551, Pages: 364-+, ISSN: 0028-0836

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Grether GF, Peiman KS, Tobias JA, Robinson BWet al., 2017, Causes and Consequences of Behavioral Interference between Species, TRENDS IN ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 32, Pages: 760-772, ISSN: 0169-5347

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Thaxter CB, Buchanan GM, Carr J, Butchart SHM, Newbold T, Green RE, Tobias JA, Foden WB, O'Brien S, Pearce-Higgins JWet al., 2017, Bird and bat species' global vulnerability to collision mortality at wind farms revealed through a trait-based assessment, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 284, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Cooney CR, Tobias JA, Weir JT, Botero CA, Seddon Net al., 2017, Sexual selection, speciation and constraints on geographical range overlap in birds, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 20, Pages: 863-871, ISSN: 1461-023X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Stoddard MC, Yong EH, Akkaynak D, Sheard C, Tobias JA, Mahadevan Let al., 2017, Avian egg shape: Form, function, and evolution, SCIENCE, Vol: 356, Pages: 1249-+, ISSN: 0036-8075

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bath E, Bowden S, Peters C, Reddy A, Tobias JA, Easton-Calabria E, Seddon N, Goodwin SF, Wigby Set al., 2017, Sperm and sex peptide stimulate aggression in female &ITDrosophila&IT, NATURE ECOLOGY & EVOLUTION, Vol: 1, ISSN: 2397-334X

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Fecchio A, Svensson-Coelho M, Bell J, Ellis VA, Medeiros MC, Trisos CH, Blake JG, Loiselle BA, Tobias JA, Fanti R, Coffey ED, De Faria IP, Pinho JB, Felix G, Braga EM, Anciaes M, Tkach V, Bates J, Witt C, Weckstein JD, Ricklefs RE, Farias IPet al., 2017, Host associations and turnover of haemosporidian parasites in manakins (Aves: Pipridae), PARASITOLOGY, Vol: 144, Pages: 984-993, ISSN: 0031-1820

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Hosner PA, Tobias JA, Braun EL, Kimball RTet al., 2017, How do seemingly non-vagile clades accomplish trans-marine dispersal? Trait and dispersal evolution in the landfowl (Ayes: Galliformes), PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 284, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Mason NA, Burns KJ, Tobias JA, Claramunt S, Seddon N, Derryberry EPet al., 2017, Song evolution, speciation, and vocal learning in passerine birds, EVOLUTION, Vol: 71, Pages: 786-796, ISSN: 0014-3820

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Pigot AL, Bregman T, Sheard C, Daly B, Etienne RS, Tobias JAet al., 2016, Quantifying species contributions to ecosystem processes: a global assessment of functional trait and phylogenetic metrics across avian seed-dispersal networks, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Seddon N, Mace GM, Naeem S, Tobias JA, Pigot AL, Cavanagh R, Mouillot D, Vause J, Walpole Met al., 2016, Biodiversity in the Anthropocene: prospects and policy, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Bregman TP, Lees AC, MacGregor HEA, Darski B, de Moura NG, Aleixo A, Barlow J, Tobias JAet al., 2016, Using avian functional traits to assess the impact of land-cover change on ecosystem processes linked to resilience in tropical forests., Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol: 283, ISSN: 0962-8452

Vertebrates perform key roles in ecosystem processes via trophic interactions with plants and insects, but the response of these interactions to environmental change is difficult to quantify in complex systems, such as tropical forests. Here, we use the functional trait structure of Amazonian forest bird assemblages to explore the impacts of land-cover change on two ecosystem processes: seed dispersal and insect predation. We show that trait structure in assemblages of frugivorous and insectivorous birds remained stable after primary forests were subjected to logging and fire events, but that further intensification of human land use substantially reduced the functional diversity and dispersion of traits, and resulted in communities that occupied a different region of trait space. These effects were only partially reversed in regenerating secondary forests. Our findings suggest that local extinctions caused by the loss and degradation of tropical forest are non-random with respect to functional traits, thus disrupting the network of trophic interactions regulating seed dispersal by forest birds and herbivory by insects, with important implications for the structure and resilience of human-modified tropical forests. Furthermore, our results illustrate how quantitative functional traits for specific guilds can provide a range of metrics for estimating the contribution of biodiversity to ecosystem processes, and the response of such processes to land-cover change.

JOURNAL ARTICLE

Ulrich W, Lens L, Tobias JA, Habel JCet al., 2016, Contrasting Patterns of Species Richness and Functional Diversity in Bird Communities of East African Cloud Forest Fragments, PLOS ONE, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1932-6203

JOURNAL ARTICLE

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

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