Imperial College London

DrJaneWarwick

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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j.warwick

 
 
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LG32BNorfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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77 results found

Peters R, Warwick J, Anstey KJ, Anderson CSet al., 2019, Blood pressure and dementia What the SPRINT-MIND trial adds and what we still need to know, NEUROLOGY, Vol: 92, Pages: 1017-1018, ISSN: 0028-3878

Journal article

Gohel MS, Heatley F, Liu X, Bradbury A, Bulbulia R, Cullum N, Epstein DM, Nyamekye I, Poskitt KR, Renton S, Warwick J, Davies AHet al., 2019, Early versus deferred endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux in patients with venous ulceration: the EVRA RCT, Health Technology Assessment, Vol: 23, Pages: 1-96, ISSN: 1366-5278

BackgroundVenous ulceration is a common and costly health-care issue worldwide, with poor healing rates greatly affecting patient quality of life. Compression bandaging has been shown to improve healing rates and reduce recurrence, but does not address the underlying cause, which is often superficial venous reflux. Surgical correction of the reflux reduces ulcer recurrence; however, the effect of early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux on ulcer healing is unclear.ObjectivesTo determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of compression therapy with early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux compared with compression therapy with deferred endovenous ablation in patients with venous ulceration.DesignA pragmatic, two-arm, multicentre, parallel-group, open randomised controlled trial with a health economic evaluation.SettingSecondary care vascular centres in England.ParticipantsPatients aged ≥ 18 years with a venous leg ulcer of between 6 weeks’ and 6 months’ duration and an ankle–brachial pressure index of ≥ 0.8 who could tolerate compression and were deemed suitable for endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux.InterventionsParticipants were randomised 1 : 1 to either early ablation (compression therapy and superficial endovenous ablation within 2 weeks of randomisation) or deferred ablation (compression therapy followed by endovenous ablation once the ulcer had healed).Main outcome measuresThe primary outcome measure was time from randomisation to ulcer healing, confirmed by blinded assessment. Secondary outcomes included 24-week ulcer healing rates, ulcer-free time, clinical success (in addition to quality of life), costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). All analyses were performed on an intention-to-treat basis.ResultsA total of 450 participants were recruited (224 to early and 226 to deferred superficial endovenous ablation). Baseline characteristics were si

Journal article

Epstein DM, Gohel MS, Heatley F, Liu X, Bradbury A, Bulbulia R, Cullum N, Nyamekye I, Poskitt KR, Renton S, Warwick J, Davies AH, Gohel MS, Read D, Hargreaves S, Dhillon K, Anwar M, Liddle A, Brown H, Mercer K, Gill F, Liu A, Jepson W, Wormwell A, Rafferty H, Davies AH, Dhillon K, Kaur R, Solomon E, Sritharan K, Velineni R, Lim CS, Busuttil A, Bootun R, Bicknell C, Jenkins M, Lane T, Serjeant E, Poskitt K, Bulbulia R, Waldron J, Wolfrey G, Slim F, Davies C, Emerson L, Grasty M, Whyman M, Wakeley C, Cooper A, Clapp J, Hogg N, Howard J, Dyer J, Lyes S, Teemul D, Harvey K, Pride M, Kindon A, Price H, Flemming L, Birch G, Holmes H, Weston J, Joseph T, Eiffel R, Ojimba T, Wilson T, Hodgson A, Robinson L, Todhunter J, Heagarty D, Mckeane A, McCarthy R, Barwell J, Northcott C, Elstone A, West C, Chong P, Gerrard D, Croucher A, Levy S, Martin C, Craig T, Carradice D, Firth A, Clarke E, Oswald A, Sinclair J, Chetter I, El-Sheikha J, Nandhra S, Leung C, Scott J, Dewhirst N, Woods J, Russell D, Darwood R, Troxler M, Thackeray J, Bell D, Watson D, Williamson L, Coulston J, Eyers P, Darvall K, Hunter I, Stewart A, Moss A, Rewbury J, Adams C, Vickery L, Foote L, Durman H, Venn F, Hill P, James K, Luxton F, Greenwell D, Roberts K, Mitchell S, Tate M, Mills H, Garnham A, Hobbs S, McIntosh D, Green M, Collins K, Rankin J, Poulton P, Isgar V, Renton S, Dhillon K, Trivedi M, Kafeza M, Parsapour S, Moore H, Najem M, Connarty S, Albon H, Lloyd C, Trant J, Vohra R, McCormack J, Marshall J, Hardy V, Rogoveanu R, Goff W, Garnham A, Gidda R, Merotra S, Shiralkar S, Jayatunga A, Pathak R, Rehman A, Randhawa K, Lewis J, Fullwood S, Jennings S, Cole S, Wall M, Ranaboldo C, Hulin S, Clarke C, Fennelly R, Cooper R, Boyes R, Draper C, Harris L, Mead D, Bradbury A, Kelly L, Bate G, Davies H, Popplewell M, Claridge M, Gannon M, Khaira H, Scriven M, Wilmink T, Adam D, Nasr H, Dodd D, Nawaz S, Humphreys J, Barnes M, Sorrell J, Swift D, Phillips P, Trender H, Fenwick N, Rittoo D, Baker S, Mitchell Ret al., 2019, Cost-effectiveness analysis of a randomized clinical trial of early versus deferred endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux in patients with venous ulceration, British Journal of Surgery, Vol: 106, Pages: 555-562, ISSN: 0007-1323

BackgroundTreatment of superficial venous reflux in addition to compression therapy accelerates venous leg ulcer healing and reduces ulcer recurrence. The aim of this study was to evaluate the costs and cost‐effectiveness of early versus delayed endovenous treatment of patients with venous leg ulcers.MethodsThis was a within‐trial cost‐utility analysis with a 1‐year time horizon using data from the EVRA (Early Venous Reflux Ablation) trial. The study compared early versus deferred endovenous ablation for superficial venous truncal reflux in patients with a venous leg ulcer. The outcome measure was the cost per quality‐adjusted life‐year (QALY) over 1 year. Sensitivity analyses were conducted with alternative methods of handling missing data, alternative preference weights for health‐related quality of life, and per protocol.ResultsAfter early intervention, the mean(s.e.m.) cost was higher (difference in cost per patient £163(318) (€184(358))) and early intervention was associated with more QALYs at 1 year (mean(s.e.m.) difference 0·041(0·017)). The incremental cost‐effectiveness ratio (ICER) was £3976 (€4482) per QALY. There was an 89 per cent probability that early venous intervention is cost‐effective at a threshold of £20 000 (€22 546)/QALY. Sensitivity analyses produced similar results, confirming that early treatment of superficial reflux is highly likely to be cost‐effective.ConclusionEarly treatment of superficial reflux is highly likely to be cost‐effective in patients with venous leg ulcers over 1 year. Registration number: ISRCTN02335796 (http://www.isrctn.com).

Journal article

Peters R, Anstey KJ, Booth A, Beckett N, Warwick J, Antikainen R, Rockwood K, Peters J, Bulpitt CJet al., 2018, Orthostatic hypotension and symptomatic subclinical orthostatic hypotension increase risk of cognitive impairment: an integrated evidence review and analysis of a large older adult hypertensive cohort, EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 39, Pages: 3135-3143, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Gohel MS, Heatley F, Liu X, Bradbury A, Bulbulia R, Cullum N, Epstein DM, Nyamekye I, Poskitt KR, Renton S, Warwick J, Davies AHet al., 2018, A randomized trial of early endovenous ablation in venous ulceration, New England Journal of Medicine, Vol: 378, Pages: 2105-2114, ISSN: 0028-4793

Background: Venous disease is the most common cause of leg ulceration. Although compression therapy improves venous ulcer healing, it does not treat the underlying causes of venous hypertension. Treatment of superficial venous reflux has been shown to reduce the rate of ulcer recurrence, but the effect of early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux on ulcer healing remains unclear.Methods:In a trial conducted at 20 centers in the United Kingdom, we randomly assigned 450 patients with venous leg ulcers to receive compression therapy and undergo early endovenous ablation of superficial venous reflux within 2 weeks after randomization (early-intervention group) or to receive compression therapy alone, with consideration of endovenous ablation deferred until after the ulcer was healed or until 6 months after randomization if the ulcer was unhealed (deferred-intervention group). The primary outcome was the time to ulcer healing. Secondary outcomes were the rate of ulcer healing at 24 weeks, the rate of ulcer recurrence, the length of time free from ulcers (ulcer-free time) during the first year after randomization, and patient-reported health-related quality of life.Results:Patient and clinical characteristics at baseline were similar in the two treatment groups. The time to ulcer healing was shorter in the early-intervention group than in the deferred-intervention group; more patients had healed ulcers with early intervention (hazard ratio for ulcer healing, 1.38; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13 to 1.68; P=0.001). The median time to ulcer healing was 56 days (95% CI, 49 to 66) in the early-intervention group and 82 days (95% CI, 69 to 92) in the deferred-intervention group. The rate of ulcer healing at 24 weeks was 85.6% in the early-intervention group and 76.3% in the deferred-intervention group. The median ulcer-free time during the first year after trial enrollment was 306 days (interquartile range, 240 to 328) in the early-intervention group and 278 da

Journal article

Ramchandani P, O'Farrelly C, Babelis D, Bakermans-Kranenburg M, Byford S, Grimas E, Iles J, van IJzendoorn M, McGinley J, Phillips C, Stein A, Warwick J, Watt H, Scott Set al., 2017, Preventing enduring behavioural problems in young children through early psychological intervention (Healthy Start, Happy Start): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial, Trials, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1745-6215

Background: Behavioural problems are common in early childhood, and can result in enduring costs to the individualand society, including an increased risk of mental and physical illness, criminality, educational failure and drug andalcohol misuse. Most previous research has examined the impact of interventions targeting older children whendifficulties are more established and harder to change, and have rarely included fathers. We are conducting a trial of apsychological intervention delivered to families with very young children, engaging both parents where possible.Methods: This study is a two-arm, parallel group, researcher-blind, randomized controlled trial, to test the clinicaleffectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a parenting intervention, Video Feedback Intervention to Promote PositiveParenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD) for parents of young children (12–36 months) at risk of behaviouraldifficulties. VIPP-SD is an evidence-based parenting intervention developed at Leiden University in the Netherlandswhich uses a video-feedback approach to support parents, particularly by enhancing parental sensitivity and sensitivediscipline in caring for children.The trial will involve 300 families, who will be randomly allocated into either an intervention group, who will receivethe video-feedback intervention (n = 150), or a control group, who will receive treatment as usual (n = 150). The trialwill evaluate whether VIPP-SD, compared to treatment as usual, leads to lower levels of behavioural problems in youngchildren who are at high risk of developing these difficulties. Assessments will be conducted at baseline, and 5 and24 months post-randomization. The primary outcome measure is a modified version of the Preschool Parental Accountof Child Symptoms (Pre-PACS), a structured clinical interview of behavioural symptoms. Secondary outcomes includecaregiver-reported behavioural difficulties, parenting behaviours, parental sensitivity, parental mood and anxiety a

Journal article

Gordon AC, Mason AJ, Thirunavukkarasu N, Perkins GD, Cecconi M, Cepkova M, Pogson DG, Aya HD, Anjum A, Frazier GJ, Santhakumaran S, Ashby D, Brett SJ, VANISH Investigatorset al., 2016, Effect of early vasopressin vs norepinephrine on kidney failure in patients with septic shock. The VANISH Randomized Clinical Trial, The Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol: 316, Pages: 509-518, ISSN: 0002-9955

IMPORTANCE: Norepinephrine is currently recommended as the first-line vasopressor in septic shock; however, early vasopressin use has been proposed as an alternative. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of early vasopressin vs norepinephrine on kidney failure in patients with septic shock. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A factorial (2×2), double-blind, randomized clinical trial conducted in 18 general adult intensive care units in the United Kingdom between February 2013 and May 2015, enrolling adult patients who had septic shock requiring vasopressors despite fluid resuscitation within a maximum of 6 hours after the onset of shock. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were randomly allocated to vasopressin (titrated up to 0.06 U/min) and hydrocortisone (n = 101), vasopressin and placebo (n = 104), norepinephrine and hydrocortisone (n = 101), or norepinephrine and placebo (n = 103). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: The primary outcome was kidney failure-free days during the 28-day period after randomization, measured as (1) the proportion of patients who never developed kidney failure and (2) median number of days alive and free of kidney failure for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both. Rates of renal replacement therapy, mortality, and serious adverse events were secondary outcomes. RESULTS: A total of 409 patients (median age, 66 years; men, 58.2%) were included in the study, with a median time to study drug administration of 3.5 hours after diagnosis of shock. The number of survivors who never developed kidney failure was 94 of 165 patients (57.0%) in the vasopressin group and 93 of 157 patients (59.2%) in the norepinephrine group (difference, -2.3% [95% CI, -13.0% to 8.5%]). The median number of kidney failure-free days for patients who did not survive, who experienced kidney failure, or both was 9 days (interquartile range [IQR], 1 to -24) in the vasopressin group and 13 days (IQR, 1

Journal article

Patel PB, Brett SJ, O'Callaghan D, Anjum A, Cross M, Warwick J, Gordon ACet al., 2016, Protocol for a randomised control trial of methylnaltrexone for the treatment of opioid-induced constipation and gastrointestinal stasis in intensive care patients (MOTION), BMJ Open, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2044-6055

Introduction: Gastro-intestinal dysmotility and constipation are common problems in intensive care patients. The majority of critical care patients are sedated with opioids to facilitate tolerance of endotracheal tubes and mechanical ventilation, which inhibit gastrointestinal motility and lead to adverse outcomes. Methylnaltrexone is a peripheral opioid antagonist that does not cross the blood-brain barrier and can reverse the peripheral side effects of opioids without affecting the desired central properties. This trial will investigate whether methylnaltrexone can reverse opioid induced constipation and gastro-intestinal dysmotility.Methods: This is a single centre, multi-site, double blind, randomised placebo controlled trial. Eighty-four patients will be recruited from four Intensive Care Units (ICU) within Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust. Patients will receive intravenous methylnaltrexone or placebo on a daily basis if they are receiving opioid infusion to facilitate mechanical ventilation, and have not opened their bowels for 48 hours. All patients will receive standard laxatives as per the clinical ICU bowel protocol prior to randomisation. The primary outcome of the trial will be time to significant rescue-free laxation following randomisation. Secondary outcomes will include tolerance of enteral feed, gastric residual volumes, incidence of pneumonia, blood stream and Clostridium difficile infection, and any reversal of central opioid effects.Ethics and Dissemination: The trial protocol, the Patient / legal representative Information Sheets and Consent Forms have been reviewed and approved by the Harrow Research Ethics Committee (REC Reference 14/LO/2004). An independent Trial Steering Committee and Data Monitoring Committee are in place, with patient representation. Upon completion, the trial results will be published in peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international scientific meetings.

Journal article

Uthaya SN, Liu X, Babalis D, Doré C, Warwick J, Bell J, Thomas E, Ashby D, Durighel G, Ederies A, Yanez-Lopez M, Modi Net al., 2016, Nutritional Evaluation and Optimisation in Neonates (NEON): a randomised double-blind controlled trial of amino-acid regimen and intravenous lipid composition in preterm parenteral nutrition, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol: 103, Pages: 1443-1452, ISSN: 1938-3207

BackgroundParenteral nutrition is central to the care of very immature infants. Current international recommendations favour higher amino-acid intakes and fish oil-containing lipid emulsions. ObjectiveThe aim of this two-by-two factorial, double-blind multicentre randomised controlled trial was to compare the effect of high (immediate Recommended Daily Intake: Imm-RDI) versus low (incremental introduction: Inc-AA) parenteral amino-acid delivery, commenced within 24 hours of birth, on body composition, and a multi-component lipid emulsion containing 30% soy bean oil, 30% medium chain triglycerides, 25% olive oil and 15% fish oil (SMOF) versus soybean oil based lipid emulsion (SO) on Intra-Hepato-Cellular Lipid (IHCL) content. ResultsWe randomised 168 infants born <31 weeks gestation. We evaluated outcomes at term in 133 infants. There were no significant differences between Imm-RDI and Inc-AA groups for non-adipose mass (adjusted mean difference (95% CI): 1.0g (-108, 111) p=0.98) or between SMOF and SO groups for IHCL (adjusted mean ratio SMOF:SO (95% CI): 1.1 (0.8, 1.6) p=0.58). SMOF does not affect IHCL content. There was a significant interaction (p=0.05) between the two interventions for non-adipose mass. There were no significant interactions between group differences for either primary outcome measure after adjusting for additional confounders. Imm-RDI infants were more likely than Inc-AA infants to have blood urea nitrogen levels greater than 7mmol/l or 10mmol/l respectively (75% vs 49%; p<0.01 and 49% vs 18%; p<0.01). Head circumference at term was smaller in the Imm-RDI group (mean difference (95% CI): -0.8cm (-1.5, -0.1) p= 0.02). There were no significant differences in any pre-specified secondary outcomes including adiposity, liver function tests, incidence of conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia, weight, length, mortality and brain volumes. ConclusionsImmediate delivery of Recommended Daily Intake of parenteral amino-acids does not benefit body compo

Journal article

Kyrgiou M, Swart A-M, Qian W, Warwick Jet al., 2015, A Comparison of Outcomes Following Laparoscopic and Open Hysterectomy With or Without Lymphadenectomy for Presumed Early-Stage Endometrial Cancer Results From the Medical Research Council ASTEC Trial, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF GYNECOLOGICAL CANCER, Vol: 25, Pages: 1424-1436, ISSN: 1048-891X

Journal article

Assi V, Massat NJ, Thomas S, MacKay J, Warwick J, Kataoka M, Warsi I, Brentnall A, Warren R, Duffy SWet al., 2015, A case-control study to assess the impact of mammographic density on breast cancer risk in women aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk., Int J Cancer, Vol: 136, Pages: 2378-2387

Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer, but its potential application in risk management is not clear, partly due to uncertainties about its interaction with other breast cancer risk factors. We aimed to quantify the impact of mammographic density on breast cancer risk in women aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk of breast cancer (average lifetime risk of 23%), in particular in premenopausal women, and to investigate its relationship with other breast cancer risk factors in this population. We present the results from a case-control study nested with the FH01 cohort study of 6,710 women mostly aged 40-49 at intermediate familial risk of breast cancer. One hundred and three cases of breast cancer were age-matched to one or two controls. Density was measured by semiautomated interactive thresholding. Absolute density, but not percent density, was a significant risk factor for breast cancer in this population after adjusting for area of nondense tissue (OR per 10 cm(2) = 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.15, p = 0.04). The effect was stronger in premenopausal women, who made up the majority of the study population. Absolute density remained a significant predictor of breast cancer risk after adjusting for age at menarche, age at first live birth, parity, past or present hormone replacement therapy, and the Tyrer-Cuzick 10-year relative risk estimate of breast cancer. Absolute density can improve breast cancer risk stratification and delineation of high-risk groups alongside the Tyrer-Cuzick 10-year relative risk estimate.

Journal article

Warwick J, Falaschetti E, Rockwood K, Mitnitski A, Thijs LB, Beckett NS, Bulpitt CJB, Peters RMet al., 2015, No evidence that frailty modifies the positive impact of antihypertensive treatment in very elderly people: An investigation of the impact of frailty upon treatment effect in the HYpertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET) study, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of antihypertensives in people with hypertension aged 80 and over, BMC Medicine, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1741-7015

Background: Treatment for hypertension with antihypertensive medication has been shown to reduce stroke, cardiovascular events, and mortality in older adults, but there is concern that such treatment may not be appropriate in frailer older adults. To investigate whether there is an interaction between effect of treatment for hypertension and frailty in older adults, we calculated the frailty index (FI) for all available participants from the HYpertension in the Very Elderly Trial (HYVET) study, a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of antihypertensives in people with hypertension aged 80 and over, and obtained frailty adjusted estimates of the effect of treatment with antihypertensive medication on risk of stroke, cardiovascular events, and mortality. Methods: Participants in HYVET were randomised 1:1 to active treatment with indapamide sustained release 1.5 mg ± perindopril 2 to 4 mg or to matching placebo. Data relating to blood pressure, comorbidities, cognitive function, depression, and quality of life were collected at entry into the study and at subsequent follow-up visits. The FI was calculated at entry, based on 60 potential deficits. The distribution of FI was similar to that seen in population studies of adults aged 80 years and above (median FI, 0.17; IQR, 0.11-0.24). Cox regression was used to assess the impact of FI at entry to the study on subsequent risk of stroke, total mortality, and cardiovascular events. Models were stratified by region of recruitment and adjusted for sex and age at entry. Extending these models to include a term for a possible interaction between treatment for hypertension and FI provided a formula for the treatment effect as a function of FI. For all three models, the point estimates of the hazard ratios for the treatment effect decreased as FI increased, although to varying degrees and with varying certainty. Results: We found no evidence of an interaction between effect of treatment for hypertension and frailty as me

Journal article

Jayasena CN, Abbara A, Comninos AN, Nijher GMK, Christopoulos G, Narayanaswamy S, Izzi-Engbeaya C, Sridharan M, Mason AJ, Warwick J, Ashby D, Ghatei MA, Bloom SR, Carby A, Trew GH, Dhillo WSet al., 2014, Kisspeptin-54 triggers egg maturation in women undergoing in vitro fertilization, Journal of Clinical Investigation, Vol: 124, Pages: 3667-3677, ISSN: 0021-9738

BACKGROUND. Patients with mutations that inactivate kisspeptin signaling are infertile. Kisspeptin-54, the major circulating isoform of kisspeptin in humans, potently stimulates reproductive hormone secretion in humans. Animal studies suggest that kisspeptin is involved in generation of the luteinizing hormone surge, which is required for ovulation; therefore, we hypothesized that kisspeptin-54 could be used to trigger egg maturation in women undergoing in vitro fertilization therapy.METHODS. Following superovulation with recombinant follicle-stimulating hormone and administration of gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist to prevent premature ovulation, 53 women were administered a single subcutaneous injection of kisspeptin-54 (1.6 nmol/kg, n = 2; 3.2 nmol/kg, n = 3; 6.4 nmol/kg, n = 24; 12.8 nmol/kg, n = 24) to induce a luteinizing hormone surge and egg maturation. Eggs were retrieved transvaginally 36 hours after kisspeptin injection, assessed for maturation (primary outcome), and fertilized by intracytoplasmic sperm injection with subsequent transfer of one or two embryos.RESULTS. Egg maturation was observed in response to each tested dose of kisspeptin-54, and the mean number of mature eggs per patient generally increased in a dose-dependent manner. Fertilization of eggs and transfer of embryos to the uterus occurred in 92% (49/53) of kisspeptin-54–treated patients. Biochemical and clinical pregnancy rates were 40% (21/53) and 23% (12/53), respectively.CONCLUSION. This study demonstrates that a single injection of kisspeptin-54 can induce egg maturation in women with subfertility undergoing in vitro fertilization therapy. Subsequent fertilization of eggs matured following kisspeptin-54 administration and transfer of resulting embryos can lead to successful human pregnancy.TRIAL REGISTRATION. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01667406.FUNDING. Medical Research Council, Wellcome Trust, and National Institute for Health Research.

Journal article

Warwick J, Will O, Miller R, Duffy S, Greenberg Det al., 2013, Variation in colorectal cancer treatment and survival between hospitals in East Anglia, International Surgical Congress of the Association-of-Surgeons-of-Great-Britain-and-Ireland (ASGBI), Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: 118-118, ISSN: 0007-1323

Conference paper

Warwick J, Will O, Allgood P, Miller R, Duffy S, Greenberg Det al., 2013, Variation in Colorectal Cancer Treatment and Survival: A Cohort Study Covering the East Anglia Region, Colorectal Disease

Journal article

Ingham SL, Warwick J, Buchan I, Sahin S, O Hara C, Moran A, Howell A, Evans DGet al., 2013, Ovarian cancer among 8005 women from a breast cancer family history clinic: no increased risk of invasive ovarian cancer in families testing negative for BRCA1 and BRCA2, Journal of medical genetics, Vol: 50, Pages: 368-372

Journal article

Evans DGR, Warwick J, Astley SM, Stavrinos P, Sahin S, Ingham S, McBurney H, Eckersley B, Harvie M, Wilson M, Beetles U, Warren R, Hufton A, Sergeant JC, Newman WG, Buchan I, Cuzick J, Howell Aet al., 2012, Assessing Individual Breast Cancer Risk within the UK National Health Service Breast Screening Program: A New Paradigm for Cancer Prevention, CANCER PREVENTION RESEARCH, Vol: 5, Pages: 943-951, ISSN: 1940-6207

Journal article

Howell A, Astley S, Warwick J, Stavrinos P, Sahin S, Ingham S, McBurney H, Eckersley B, Harvie M, Wilson M, Beetles U, Warren R, Hufton A, Sergeant J, Newman W, Buchan I, Cuzick J, Evans DGet al., 2012, Prevention of breast cancer in the context of a national breast screening programme, JOURNAL OF INTERNAL MEDICINE, Vol: 271, Pages: 321-330, ISSN: 0954-6820

Journal article

Britton P, Warwick J, Wallis MG, O'Keeffe S, Taylor K, Sinnatamby R, Barter S, Gaskarth M, Duffy SW, Wishart GCet al., 2012, Measuring the accuracy of diagnostic imaging in symptomatic breast patients: team and individual performance., Br J Radiol, Vol: 85, Pages: 415-422

OBJECTIVE: The combination of mammography and/or ultrasound remains the mainstay in current breast cancer diagnosis. The aims of this study were to evaluate the reliability of standard breast imaging and individual radiologist performance and to explore ways that this can be improved. METHODS: A total of 16,603 separate assessment episodes were undertaken on 13,958 patients referred to a specialist symptomatic breast clinic over a 6 year period. Each mammogram and ultrasound was reported prospectively using a five-point reporting scale and compared with final outcome. RESULTS: Mammographic sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating curve (ROC) area were 66.6%, 99.7% and 0.83, respectively. The sensitivity of mammography improved dramatically from 47.6 to 86.7% with increasing age. Overall ultrasound sensitivity, specificity and ROC area was 82.0%, 99.3% and 0.91, respectively. The sensitivity of ultrasound also improved dramatically with increasing age from 66.7 to 97.1%. Breast density also had a profound effect on imaging performance, with mammographic sensitivity falling from 90.1 to 45.9% and ultrasound sensitivity reducing from 95.2 to 72.0% with increasing breast density. CONCLUSION: The sensitivity ranges widely between radiologists (53.1-74.1% for mammography and 67.1-87.0% for ultrasound). Reporting sensitivity was strongly correlated with radiologist experience. Those radiologists with less experience (and lower sensitivity) were relatively more likely to report a cancer as indeterminate/uncertain. To improve radiology reporting performance, the sensitivity of cancer reporting should be closely monitored; there should be regular feedback from needle biopsy results and discussion of reporting classification with colleagues.

Journal article

Sergeant J, Warwick J, Evans D, Howell A, Berks M, Stavrinos P, Sahin S, Wilson M, Hufton A, Buchan I, otherset al., 2012, Volumetric and area-based breast density measurement in the predicting risk of cancer at screening (PROCAS) study, Breast Imaging, Pages: 228-235

Journal article

Ingham SL, Warwick J, Byers H, Lalloo F, Newman WG, Evans DGRet al., 2012, Is multiple SNP testing in BRCA2 and BRCA1 female carriers ready for use in clinical practice? Results from a large Genetic Centre in the UK, Clinical Genetics

Journal article

Assi V, Warwick J, Cuzick J, Duffy SWet al., 2011, Clinical and epidemiological issues in mammographic density, Nature Reviews Clinical Oncology

Journal article

Evans G, Astley S, Stavrinos P, Sahin S, Ingham S, McBurney H, Eckersley B, Harvie M, Wilson M, Beetles U, Warren R, Hufton A, Warwick J, Newman W, Buchan I, Cuzick J, Howell Aet al., 2011, Feasibility and acceptability of offering breast cancer risk estimation in the context of the UK National Health Service Breast Cancer Screening Programme: a new paradigm for cancer prevention, British Human Genetics Conference, Publisher: B M J PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: S41-S41, ISSN: 0022-2593

Conference paper

Cuzick J, Warwick J, Pinney E, Duffy SW, Cawthorn S, Howell A, Forbes JF, Warren RMLet al., 2011, Tamoxifen-Induced Reduction in Mammographic Density and Breast Cancer Risk Reduction: A Nested Case-Control Study, JOURNAL OF THE NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE, Vol: 103, Pages: 744-752, ISSN: 0027-8874

Journal article

Clark SE, Warwick J, Carpenter R, Bowen RL, Duffy SW, Jones JLet al., 2011, Molecular subtyping of DCIS: heterogeneity of breast cancer reflected in pre-invasive disease, BRITISH JOURNAL OF CANCER, Vol: 104, Pages: 120-127, ISSN: 0007-0920

Journal article

Perrett CM, Harwood CA, McGregor JM, Warwick J, Cerio R, Karran Pet al., 2010, Expression of DNA mismatch repair proteins and MSH2 polymorphisms in nonmelanoma skin cancers of organ transplant recipients, BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, Vol: 162, Pages: 732-742, ISSN: 0007-0963

Journal article

Wishart G, Warwick J, Pitsinis S, Duffy SW, Britton PDet al., 2010, Measuring perfomance in clinical breast examination, British Journal of Surgery, Vol: 97, Pages: 1246-1252

Journal article

Stone J, Warren RML, Pinney E, Warwick J, Cuzick Jet al., 2009, Determinants of Percentage and Area Measures of Mammographic Density, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 170, Pages: 1571-1578, ISSN: 0002-9262

Journal article

Warwick J, Vardaki E, Fattizzi N, McNeish I, Jeyarajah A, Oram D, Hassan L, Covens A, Duffy S, Reynolds Ket al., 2009, Defining the surgical management of suspected early-stage ovarian cancer by estimating patient numbers through alternative management strategies, BJOG-AN INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF OBSTETRICS AND GYNAECOLOGY, Vol: 116, Pages: 1225-1241, ISSN: 1470-0328

Journal article

Lawrence G, Wallis M, Allgood P, Nagtegaal ID, Warwick J, Cafferty FH, Houssami N, Kearins O, Tappenden N, O'Sullivan E, Duffy SWet al., 2009, Population estimates of survival in women with screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancer taking account of lead time and length bias., Breast Cancer Res Treat, Vol: 116, Pages: 179-185

BACKGROUND: Evidence of the impact of breast screening is limited by biases inherent in non-randomised studies and often by lack of complete population data. We address this by estimating the effect of screen detection on cause-specific fatality in breast cancer, corrected for all potential biases, using population cancer registry data. METHODS: Subjects (N = 26,766) comprised all breast cancers notified to the West Midlands Cancer Intelligence Unit and diagnosed in women aged 50-74, from 1988 to 2004. These included 10,100 screen-detected and 15,862 symptomatic breast cancers (6,009 women with interval cancers and 9,853 who had not attended screening). Our endpoint was survival to death from breast cancer. We estimated the relative risk (RR) of 10-year cause-specific fatality (screen-detected compared to symptomatic cancers) correcting for lead time bias and performing sensitivity analyses for length bias. To exclude self-selection bias, survival analyses were also performed with interval cancers as the comparator symptomatic women. FINDINGS: Uncorrected RR associated with screen-detection was 0.34 (95% CI 0.31-0.37). Correcting for lead time, RR was 0.49 (95% CI 0.45-0.53); length bias analyses gave a range of RR corrected for both phenomena of 0.49-0.59, with a median of 0.51. Self-selection bias-corrected estimates yielded a median RR of 0.68. INTERPRETATION: After adjusting for various potential biases, women with screen-detected breast cancer have a substantial survival advantage over those with symptomatic breast cancer.

Journal article

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