Imperial College London

DrJanetWong

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Mechanical Engineering

Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 8991j.wong

 
 
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Location

 

671City and Guilds BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Overview

Welcome to the Wong Group

The structure and dynamics of complex fluids are strongly affected by the stress, temperatures and degree of confinement. We apply fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging to polymers and complex fluids under extreme conditions.

We are particular interested in phase stabilities, and phase transitions of bulk fluids and confined fluids at high stress and high temperature conditions. One of such complex fluids in extreme condition is lubricant in a tribological contact. Our work allows various information such as lubricant structures and viscosity, phase transition, aggregation, adsorption, and self-assembly of additives, lubricant flow to be obtained.  When combined with mechanical testing snd film thickness measurements, the molecular origins of mechanical responses of lubricated system is established.

PhD Opportunity - Structure and Rheology of lubricants /complex fluids

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Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree. The post is supported by a bursary and fees (at the UK/EU student rate) provided by an EPSRC DTA/CASE grant and partly sponsored by an oil company

The student will be involved in a project on behaviour of lubricants in extreme conditions. The project is experimental and focuses on the mechanical and rheological properties of confined lubricants in engineering conditions. These are high pressure and high shear conditions such that the conventional understanding of a Newtonian fluid may not apply. The goal is to provide the link between molecular phenomena (dynamics, conformation, aggregation, structure) and microscopic observables (friction, flow and heat generation). This will allow us to formulate general models that enable micro-and macroscopic properties of these confined fluids to be predicted accurately.  These models will be crucial to efficient machine designs.  They also have strong implications in the wider field of physics of confined complex fluids.

You will be part of the multidisciplinary team and work very closely with numerical analysts and industrial sponsors. You should have strong interest in experimental work and methodology development. You will be a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international situation.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential. 

The studentship is for 3 years from Oct 2015 and is available for UK and EU candidates meeting the Research Council criterion of having been resident in the UK for the previous 3 years, but other sources of funding might be available for highly qualified students.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College. You will have a background in Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering or a related field and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. You should have strong interest in experimental work and methodology development. Training will be given in rheology, tribology and investigative techniques including fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, electron microscopy and surface topography. You will become a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international situation.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

For further details of the post contact Dr Janet Wong j.wong@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Wong on the above e-mail address.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.

POSTDOCTORAL OPPORTUNITY - UNDERSTANDING ANTI-WEAR ADDITIVES WITH ADVANCED NOVEL OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPIES

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The Tribology Group at Imperial College London wishes to appoint a Research Associate to conduct research into the fundamental of surface film formation with novel optical and spectroscopic techniques.

 

Antiwear additives are frequently used to manage wear between two rubbing surfaces. Previously studies, mainly with ex-situ analysis, have suggested that chemical reactions occur between these additives and rubbing surfaces. However, details and governing factors of such film formation mechanisms remain elusive. Due to the complexity of underlying working mechanisms, in-situ techniques that allow real-time examination are required to further our understanding in this subject.

 

The Tribology Group, one of the largest Academic Tribology Groups in the UK, has a long tradition in the development of novel methodologies which has led to major knowledge advancement in lubrication and additive science. We are looking for a talented, like-minded researcher who would push our experimental capability further and contribute to our understanding of the relationship between mechanical stresses and the chemical reactions for film formation. Working closely with engineers, and chemists, you will incorporate advanced laser spectroscopies into tribological testing, allowing the relationship between test conditions, additive film chemistry and tribological performance to be established. You would help the development of greener, more effective antiwear additives through journal publications and discussion with the industry.

 

You should have a PhD (or equivalent, or near completion of PhD) in an area pertinent to the research subject i.e. Optics, Laser Diagnostics, Chemistry, Physics, Materials Science, or Engineering. You must have experience building your own advanced laser spectroscopic or imaging setups, such as FCS, Confocal, IR, Raman. Experience in implementations of home built laser spectroscopic techniques to engineering systems with restricted access and low signal-to-noise conditions is highly desirable. Matlab and/or Labview programming skills are essential. Knowledge in additive chemistry, tribology, self-assembly, film formation, physical/analytical chemistry, thermodynamics is preferred.  You are curious and eager to solve engineering problems through a fundamental approach. You are a skilled communicator, comfortable in a multidisciplinary and multinational setting. Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

Informal e-mail enquiries may be made to Dr Janet Wong at j.wong@imperial.ac.uk .

PHD OPPORTUNITY - TRIBOLOGY OF HIGH PERFORMANCE POLYMERS

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Applications are invited for a research studentship in the field of tribology, leading to the award of a PhD degree.

High performance polymers are polymers that have high glass transition temperatures and unique properties. In certain conditions, they may replace components that are traditionally made of metal. Energy sector is particularly interested in this possibility due to reasons of cost, durability, conformability to dynamic seal surfaces and resistance to chemical attack  (corrosion, swelling, thermal or thermo-oxidative degradation). Polymers such as polyphenylene sulphide, polyaryletherketone and polyimide are common candidates and they are frequently reinforced with fillers such as carbon black, graphite, molybdenum disulphide, lubricious polymer like PTFE and metallic powders, such as high lead bronze and bismuth. The tribology for these polymeric components governs the efficiency and durability of the engineering systems they are involved. Yet, very little is known about the tribology of polymer.

This project concerns the tribological performance of reinforced high performance polymer and polymer blends in conditions relevant to the energy sector. It is experimental and focuses on the role of transfer films. We aim to obtain an in-depth understanding on the nature and also the formation and functioning mechanisms of transfer films. The project is multidisciplinary, combining tribology, mechanics, heat transfer, chemistry and materials science. In addition, you will also work very closely with an industrial sponsor who specialised in the design and manufacturing engineering components for the energy sector.

The studentship is for 3 years from Oct 2017 and is available for UK and EU candidates meeting the Research Council criterion of having been resident in the UK for the previous 3 years, but other sources of funding might be available for highly qualified students.

You will be an enthusiastic and self-motivated person who meets the academic requirements for enrolment for the PhD degree at Imperial College. You are passionate about searching for the truth. You will have a background in Mechanical Engineering, Physics, Chemistry, Materials Science, Chemical Engineering, Aeronautical Engineering or a related field and an enquiring and rigorous approach to research together with a strong intellect and disciplined work habits. You should have strong interest in experimental work and methodology development. Training will be given in tribology and investigative techniques including fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy, electron microscopy and surface analysis. You will become a skilled communicator, comfortable in an international situation.  Good team-working, observational and communication skills are essential.

For further details of the post contact Dr Janet Wong j.wong@imperial.ac.uk. Interested applicants should send an up-to-date curriculum vitae to Dr Wong on the above e-mail address.  Suitable candidates will be required to complete an electronic application form at Imperial College London in order for their qualifications to be addressed by College Registry.