Imperial College London

DrJamesMoss

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Senior Physiology Teaching Fellow
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

james.moss

 
 
//

Location

 

G02 Faculty Education OfficeSir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

10 results found

Alqurashi YD, Dawidziuk A, Alqarni A, Kelly J, Moss J, Polkey M, Morrell MJet al., 2021, A visual analog scale for the assessment of mild sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and healthy participants, ANNALS OF THORACIC MEDICINE, Vol: 16, Pages: 141-147, ISSN: 1817-1737

Journal article

Alqurashi YD, Nakamura T, Goverdovsky V, Moss J, Polkey MI, Mandic DP, Morrell MJet al., 2018, A novel in-ear sensor to determine sleep latency during the Multiple Sleep Latency Test in healthy adults with and without sleep restriction, Nature and Science of Sleep, Vol: 10, Pages: 385-396, ISSN: 1179-1608

Objectives: Detecting sleep latency during the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) using electroencephalogram (scalp-EEG) is time-consuming. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a novel in-ear sensor (in-ear EEG) to detect the sleep latency, compared to scalp-EEG, during MSLT in healthy adults, with and without sleep restriction.Methods: We recruited 25 healthy adults (28.5±5.3 years) who participated in two MSLTs with simultaneous recording of scalp and in-ear EEG. Each test followed a randomly assigned sleep restriction (≤5 hours sleep) or usual night sleep (≥7 hours sleep). Reaction time and Stroop test were used to assess the functional impact of the sleep restriction. The EEGs were scored blind to the mode of measurement and study conditions, using American Academy of Sleep Medicine 2012 criteria. The Agreement between the scalp and in-ear EEG was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis.Results: Technically acceptable data were obtained from 23 adults during 69 out of 92 naps in the sleep restriction condition and 25 adults during 85 out of 100 naps in the usual night sleep. Meaningful sleep restrictions were confirmed by an increase in the reaction time (mean ± SD: 238±30 ms vs 228±27 ms; P=0.045). In the sleep restriction condition, the in-ear EEG exhibited a sensitivity of 0.93 and specificity of 0.80 for detecting sleep latency, with a substantial agreement (κ=0.71), whereas after the usual night’s sleep, the in-ear EEG exhibited a sensitivity of 0.91 and specificity of 0.89, again with a substantial agreement (κ=0.79).Conclusion: The in-ear sensor was able to detect reduced sleep latency following sleep restriction, which was sufficient to impair both the reaction time and cognitive function. Substantial agreement was observed between the scalp and in-ear EEG when measuring sleep latency. This new in-ear EEG technology is shown to have a significant value as a convenient measure for sleep lat

Journal article

Patrick Y, Lee A, Raha O, Pillai K, Gupta S, Sethi S, Mukeshimana F, Gerard L, Moghal MU, Saleh SN, Smith SF, Morrell MJ, Moss Jet al., 2017, Effects of sleep deprivation on cognitive and physical performance in university students, Sleep and Biological Rhythms, Vol: 15, Pages: 217-225, ISSN: 1446-9235

Sleep deprivation is common among university students, and has been associated with poor academic performance and physical dysfunction. However, current literature has a narrow focus in regard to domains tested, this study aimed to investigate the effects of a night of sleep deprivation on cognitive and physical performance in students. A randomized controlled crossover study was carried out with 64 participants [58% male (n = 37); 22 ± 4 years old (mean ± SD)]. Participants were randomized into two conditions: normal sleep or one night sleep deprivation. Sleep deprivation was monitored using an online time-stamped questionnaire at 45 min intervals, completed in the participants’ homes. The outcomes were cognitive: working memory (Simon game© derivative), executive function (Stroop test); and physical: reaction time (ruler drop testing), lung function (spirometry), rate of perceived exertion, heart rate, and blood pressure during submaximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing. Data were analysed using paired two-tailed T tests and MANOVA. Reaction time and systolic blood pressure post-exercise were significantly increased following sleep deprivation (mean ± SD change: reaction time: 0.15 ± 0.04 s, p = 0.003; systolic BP: 6 ± 17 mmHg, p = 0.012). No significant differences were found in other variables. Reaction time and vascular response to exercise were significantly affected by sleep deprivation in university students, whilst other cognitive and cardiopulmonary measures showed no significant changes. These findings indicate that acute sleep deprivation can have an impact on physical but not cognitive ability in young healthy university students. Further research is needed to identify mechanisms of change and the impact of longer term sleep deprivation in this population.

Journal article

Klonizakis M, Moss J, Gilbert S, Broom D, Foster J, Tew GAet al., 2014, Low-volume high-intensity interval training rapidly improves cardiopulmonary function in postmenopausal women, Menopause, Vol: 21, Pages: 1099-1105, ISSN: 1072-3714

Journal article

Gunasekera RC, Moss J, Crank H, Mitchell PA, Nawaz S, Tew GAet al., 2014, Patient recruitment and experiences in a randomised trial of supervised exercise training for individuals with abdominal aortic aneurysm, Journal of Vascular Nursing, Vol: 32, Pages: 4-9, ISSN: 1062-0303

Journal article

Moss J, Tew GA, Copeland RJ, Stout M, Billings CG, Saxton JM, Winter EM, Bianchi SMet al., 2014, Effects of a Pragmatic Lifestyle Intervention for Reducing Body Mass in Obese Adults with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea: A Randomised Controlled Trial, BioMed Research International, Vol: 2014, Pages: 1-8, ISSN: 2314-6133

<jats:p>This study investigated the effects of a pragmatic lifestyle intervention in obese adults with continuous positive airway pressure-treated obstructive sleep apnoea hypopnoea syndrome (OSAHS). Sixty patients were randomised 1 : 1 to either a 12-week lifestyle intervention or an advice-only control group. The intervention involved supervised exercise sessions, dietary advice, and the promotion of lifestyle behaviour change using cognitive-behavioural techniques. Outcomes were assessed at baseline (week 0), intervention end-point (week 13), and follow-up (week 26). The primary outcome was 13-week change in body mass. Secondary outcomes included anthropometry, blood-borne biomarkers, exercise capacity, and health-related quality of life. At end-point, the intervention group exhibited small reductions in body mass (−1.8 [−3.0, −0.5] kg;<mml:math xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" id="M1"><mml:mi>P</mml:mi><mml:mo>=</mml:mo><mml:mn>0.007</mml:mn></mml:math>) and body fat percentage (−1 [−2, 0]%;<mml:math xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" id="M2"><mml:mi>P</mml:mi><mml:mo>=</mml:mo><mml:mn>0.044</mml:mn></mml:math>) and moderate improvements in C-reactive protein (−1.3 [−2.4, −0.2] mg·L<jats:sup>−1</jats:sup>;<mml:math xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" id="M3"><mml:mi>P</mml:mi><mml:mo>=</mml:mo><mml:mn>0.028</mml:mn></mml:math>) and exercise capacity (95 [50, 139] m;<mml:math xmlns:mml="http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML" id="M4"><mml:mi>P</mml:mi><mml:mo>&lt;</mml:mo><mml:mn>0.001</mml:mn></mml:math>). At follow-up, changes in body mass (&minu

Journal article

Tew GA, Moss J, Crank H, Mitchell PA, Nawaz Set al., 2012, Endurance Exercise Training in Patients With Small Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: A Randomized Controlled Pilot Study, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol: 93, Pages: 2148-2153, ISSN: 0003-9993

Journal article

Tew GA, Saxton JM, Klonizakis M, Moss J, Ruddock AD, Hodges GJet al., 2011, Aging and aerobic fitness affect the contribution of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves to the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating, Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol: 110, Pages: 1264-1270, ISSN: 8750-7587

<jats:p> Sedentary aging results in a diminished rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating. We investigated whether this diminished response was due to altered contributions of noradrenergic sympathetic nerves by assessing 1) the age-related decline and 2) the effect of aerobic fitness. Using laser-Doppler flowmetry, we measured skin blood flow (SkBF) in young (24 ± 1 yr) and older (64 ± 1 yr) endurance-trained and sedentary men ( n = 7 per group) at baseline and during 35 min of local skin heating to 42°C at 1) untreated forearm sites, 2) forearm sites treated with bretylium tosylate (BT), which prevents neurotransmitter release from noradrenergic sympathetic nerves, and 3) forearm sites treated with yohimbine + propranolol (YP), which antagonizes α- and β-adrenergic receptors. SkBF was converted to cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC = SkBF/mean arterial pressure) and normalized to maximal CVC (%CVC<jats:sub>max</jats:sub>) achieved by skin heating to 44°C. Pharmacological agents were administered using microdialysis. In the young trained group, the rapid vasodilator response was reduced at BT and YP sites ( P &lt; 0.05); by contrast, in the young sedentary and older trained groups, YP had no effect ( P &gt; 0.05), but BT did ( P &gt; 0.05). Neither BT nor YP affected the rapid vasodilator response in the older sedentary group ( P &gt; 0.05). These data suggest that the age-related reduction in the rapid vasodilator response is due to an impairment of sympathetic-dependent mechanisms, which can be partly attenuated with habitual aerobic exercise. Rapid vasodilation involves noradrenergic neurotransmitters in young trained men and nonadrenergic sympathetic cotransmitters (e.g., neuropeptide Y) in young sedentary and older trained men, possibly as a compensatory mechanism. Finally, in older sedentary men, the rapid vasodilation appears not to involve the sympathetic system. </jats:p>

Journal article

Tew GA, Klonizakis M, Moss J, Ruddock AD, Saxton JM, Hodges GJet al., 2011, Reproducibility of cutaneous thermal hyperaemia assessed by laser Doppler flowmetry in young and older adults, Microvascular Research, Vol: 81, Pages: 177-182, ISSN: 0026-2862

Journal article

Tew GA, Klonizakis M, Moss J, Ruddock AD, Saxton JM, Hodges GJet al., 2011, Role of sensory nerves in the rapid cutaneous vasodilator response to local heating in young and older endurance-trained and untrained men, Experimental Physiology, Vol: 96, Pages: 163-170, ISSN: 0958-0670

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00845851&limit=30&person=true