Imperial College London

Jeff Eaton

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Reader in Epidemiology, Demography, and Applied Statistics
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

jeffrey.eaton

 
 
//

Location

 

UG7Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

133 results found

Laga I, Niu X, Rucinski K, Baral S, Rao A, Chen D, Viswasam N, Phaswana-Mafuya NR, Diouf D, Sabin K, Eaton J, Zhao J, Bao Let al., 2022, Mapping the number of female sex workers in countries across sub- Saharan Africa, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of USA, ISSN: 0027-8424

Journal article

Kuchukhidze S, Panagiotoglou D, Boily M-C, Diabaté S, Eaton J, Mbofana F, Sardinha L, Schrubbe L, Stöckl H, Wanyenze RK, Maheu-Giroux Met al., 2022, The effects of intimate partner violence on women’s risk of HIV acquisition and engagement in the HIV treatment and care cascade: a pooled analysis of nationally representative surveys in sub-Saharan Africa, The Lancet HIV, ISSN: 2405-4704

Journal article

Nguyen VK, Eaton JW, 2022, A model for reconstructing trends and distribution in age at first sex from multiple household surveys with reporting biases, Epidemics, Vol: 40, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1755-4365

Age at first sex (AFS) is a key indicator for monitoring sexual behaviour risk for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Reporting of AFS data, however, suffers social-desirability and recall biases which obscure AFS trends and inferences from the data. We illustrated AFS reporting biases using data from nationally-representative Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 1992 and 2019 in Ethiopia, Guinea, Senegal, and Zambia. Based on this, we proposed a time-to-event, interval censored model for the distribution of AFS that uses overlapping reports by the same birth cohort in successive surveys to adjust for reporting biases. The three-parameter log-skew-logistic distribution described the asymmetric and nonmonotonic hazard exhibited by empirical AFS data. In cross-validation analysis, incorporating a term for reporting bias as a function of age at report improved model predictions for the trend in AFS over birth cohorts. In the four example applications, the quartiles of the AFS distribution were 16 to 23 years for Ethiopian and Senegalese women and 15 to 20 years for Guinean and Zambian men. Median AFS increased by around one to 1.5 years between the 1960 and 1989 birth cohorts for all four datasets. During adolescent and young adult ages, men tended to report an earlier AFS while women tended to report an older AFS than when asked in their late twenties. Above age 30, both male and female respondents tended to report older AFS compared to when surveyed in their late twenties. Simulations validated that the model recovered the trend in AFS in the presence of reporting biases. When there were biases, at least three surveys were needed to obtain reliable estimate for a 20-year trend. Mis-specified reference age at which AFS reporting is assumed unbiased did not affect the trend estimate but resulted in biased median AFS in the most recent birth cohorts.

Journal article

Eilerts H, Romero Prieto J, Ambia J, Khagayi S, Kabudula C, Eaton J, Reniers Get al., 2022, Evaluating pregnancy reporting in Siaya Health and Demographic Surveillance System through record linkage with ANC clinics, International Journal of Population Data Science, ISSN: 2399-4908

IntroductionHealth and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSS) are important sources of populationhealth data in sub-Saharan Africa, but the recording of pregnancies, pregnancy outcomes, andearly mortality is often incomplete.ObjectiveThis study assessed HDSS pregnancy reporting completeness and identified predictors ofunreported pregnancies that likely ended in adverse outcomes.MethodsThe analysis utilized individually-linked HDSS and antenatal care (ANC) data from Siaya,Kenya for pregnancies in 2018-2020. We cross-checked ANC records with HDSS pregnancyregistrations and outcomes. Pregnancies observed in the ANC that were missing reports in theHDSS despite a data collection round following the expected delivery date were identified aslikely adverse outcomes, and we investigated the characteristics of such individuals. Clinicaldata were used to investigate the timing of HDSS pregnancy registration relative to careseeking and gestational age, and examine misclassification of miscarriages and stillbirths.ResultsFrom an analytical sample of 2,475 pregnancies observed in the ANC registers, 46% hadpregnancy registrations in the HDSS, and 89% had retrospectively reported pregnancyoutcomes. 1% of registered pregnancies were missing outcomes, compared to 10% of thoselacking registration. Registered pregnancies had higher rates of stillbirth and perinatalmortality than those lacking registration. In 77% of cases, women accessed ANC prior toregistering the pregnancy in the HDSS. Half of reported miscarriages were misclassifiedstillbirths. We identified 141 unreported pregnancies that likely ended in adverse outcomes.Such cases were more common among those who visited ANC clinics during the firsttrimester, made fewer overall visits, were HIV-positive, and outside of formal union.ConclusionsRecord linkage with ANC clinics revealed pregnancy underreporting in HDSS, resulting inbiased measurement of perinatal mortality. Integrating records of ANC usage into routinedata collection

Journal article

Revill P, Rangaraj A, Makochekanwa A, Mpofu A, Ciaranello AL, Jahn A, Gonani A, Phillips AN, Bershteyn A, Zwizwai B, Nichols BE, Pretorius C, Kerr CC, Carlson C, Ten Brink D, Mudimu E, Kataika E, Lamontagne E, Terris-Prestholt F, Cowan FM, Manthalu G, Oberth G, Mayer-Rath G, Semini I, Taramusi I, Eaton JW, Zhao J, Stover J, Izazola-Licea JA, Kripke K, Johnson L, Bansi-Matharu L, Gorgons M, Morrison M, Chagoma N, Mugurungi O, Stuart RM, Martin-Hughes R, Nyirenda R, Barnabas RV, Mohan S, Kelly SL, Sibandze S, Walker S, Banda S, Braithwaite RS, Chidarikire T, Hallett TB, Kalua T, Apollo T, Cambiano Vet al., 2022, Perspectives on the use of modelling and economic analysis to guide HIV programmes in sub-Saharan Africa, The Lancet HIV, Vol: 9, Pages: e517-e520, ISSN: 2352-3018

HIV modelling and economic analyses have had a prominent role in guiding programmatic responses to HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. However, there has been little reflection on how the HIV modelling field might develop in future. HIV modelling should more routinely align with national government and ministry of health priorities, recognising their legitimate mandates and stewardship responsibilities, for HIV and other wider health programmes. Importance should also be placed on ensuring collaboration between modellers, and that joint approaches to addressing modelling questions, becomes the norm rather than the exception. Such an environment can accelerate translation of modelling analyses into policy formulation because areas where models agree can be prioritised for action, whereas areas over which uncertainty prevails can be slated for additional study, data collection, and analysis. HIV modelling should increasingly be integrated with the modelling of health needs beyond HIV, particularly in allocative efficiency analyses, where focusing on one disease over another might lead to worse health overall. Such integration might also enhance partnership with national governments whose mandates extend beyond HIV. Finally, we see a need for there to be substantial and equitable investment in capacity strengthening within African countries, so that African researchers will increasingly be leading modelling exercises. Building a critical mass of expertise, strengthened through external collaboration and knowledge exchange, should be the ultimate goal.

Journal article

Nguyen VK, Eaton J, 2022, Trends and country-level variation in age at first sex in sub-Saharan Africa among birth cohorts entering adulthood between 1985 and 2020, BMC Public Health, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1471-2458

Background:Debuting sexual intercourse marks exposure to pregnancy or fatherhood and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), sexual debut varies according to cultural, religious, and economic factors, and encouraging delay has been a longstanding component of behavioural HIV prevention strategies. Age at first sex (AFS) is routinely collected in national household surveys, but data are affected by reporting biases, limiting utility to monitor trends and guide sexual health interventions.Methods:We collated individual-level data from nationally-representative household surveys to analyse timing and national trends in AFS in 42 SSA countries. We used a log-skew-logistic distribution to characterize the time to AFS in a Bayesian spatio-temporal model, providing estimates of the sexual debut rate by sex, age, time, and country. We statistically adjusted for reporting biases by comparing AFS reported by the same birth cohorts in multiple survey rounds, allowing different reporting biases by sex and country.Results:Median AFS in 2015 ranged from 15.8 among Angolan women to 25.3 among men in Niger. AFS was younger for women than men in 37/40 countries. The gap was largest for Sahel region countries and minimal in southern African countries. The distribution of female AFS was asymmetric with half debuting sex in an age range of 3.9 years [IQR 3.4–5.0 across countries]. Median AFS increased slightly between 1985 and 2020, ranging 0.84 years [IQR 0.11–1.55] and 0.79 [IQR -0.23–1.98] for females and males, respectively. The gender gap changed little over time in most countries. Female teens often reported higher AFS compared to when asked in their late twenties while male teens reported lower AFS; both sexes recalled a higher AFS in older ages compared to their thirties.Conclusions:AFS increased slightly in most SSA countries, but changes were modest relative to large and persistent variation between c

Journal article

Edun O, Shenderovich Y, Zhou S, Toska E, Okell L, Eaton J, Cluver Let al., 2022, Predictors and consequences of HIV status disclosure to adolescents living with HIV in Eastern Cape, South Africa: a prospective cohort study, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Vol: 25, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1758-2652

IntroductionThe World Health Organization recommends full disclosure of HIV-positive status to adolescents who acquired HIV perinatally (APHIV) by age 12. However, even among adolescents (aged 10–19) already on antiretroviral therapy (ART), disclosure rates are low. Caregivers often report the child being too young and fear of disclosure worsening adolescents’ mental health as reasons for non-disclosure. We aimed to identify the predictors of disclosure and the association of disclosure with adherence, viral suppression and mental health outcomes among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.MethodsAnalyses included three rounds (2014–2018) of data collected among a closed cohort of adolescents living with HIV in Eastern Cape, South Africa. We used logistic regression with respondent random-effects to identify factors associated with disclosure, and assess differences in ART adherence, viral suppression and mental health symptoms between adolescents by disclosure status. We also explored differences in the change in mental health symptoms and adherence between study rounds and disclosure groups with logistic regression.ResultsEight hundred and thirteen APHIV were interviewed at baseline, of whom 769 (94.6%) and 729 (89.7%) were interviewed at the second and third rounds, respectively. The proportion aware of their HIV-positive status increased from 63.1% at the first round to 85.5% by the third round. Older age (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 1.27; 1.08–1.48) and living in an urban location (aOR: 2.85; 1.72–4.73) were associated with disclosure between interviews. There was no association between awareness of HIV-positive status and ART adherence, viral suppression or mental health symptoms among all APHIV interviewed. However, among APHIV not aware of their status at baseline, adherence decreased at the second round among those who were disclosed to (N = 131) and increased among those not disclosed to (N = 151) (interaction aOR: 0.39; 0.19&ndash

Journal article

Moorhouse L, Schaefer R, Eaton JW, Dadirai T, Maswera R, Museka T, Mandizvidza P, Dzamatira F, Tsenesa B, Hallett TB, Nyamukapa C, Gregson Set al., 2022, Male partners' influence on adolescent girls and young women's use of combination HIV prevention: insights from analysis of HIV-prevention cascade data collected in a general-population survey in Manicaland, Zimbabwe, AIDS 2022

Conference paper

Telford CT, Tessema Z, Msukwa M, Arons MM, Theu J, Bangara FF, Ernst A, Welty S, OMalley G, Dobbs T, Shanmugam V, Kabaghe A, Dale H, Wadonda-Kabondo N, Gugsa S, Kim A, Bello G, Eaton JW, Jahn A, Nyirenda R, Parekh BS, Shiraishi RW, Kim E, Tobias JL, Curran KG, Payne D, Auld AFet al., 2022, Geospatial transmission hotspots of recent HIV infection — Malawi, October 2019–March 2020, MMWR. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, Vol: 71, Pages: 329-334, ISSN: 0149-2195

What is already known about this topic?A novel HIV infection surveillance initiative was implemented in Malawi to collect data on recent HIV infections among new diagnoses to characterize the epidemic and guide the public health response.What is added by this report?Higher proportions of recent infections were identified among females, persons aged <30 years, and clients at maternal and child health and youth clinics. Spatial analysis identified three hotspots of health facilities with significantly higher rates of recent infection than expected across five districts.What are the implications for public health practice?Geospatial analysis of recent HIV infection surveillance data can identify potential transmission hotspots. This information could be used to tailor program activities to strengthen HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services and ultimately interrupt transmission.

Journal article

Hodgins C, Stannah J, Kuchukhidze S, Zembe L, Eaton JW, Boily M-C, Maheu-Giroux Met al., 2022, Population sizes, HIV prevalence, and HIV prevention among men who paid for sex in sub-Saharan Africa (2000-2020): a meta-analysis of 87 population-based surveys, PLoS Medicine, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1549-1277

BACKGROUND: Key populations, including sex workers, are at high risk of HIV acquisition and transmission. Men who pay for sex can contribute to HIV transmission through sexual relationships with both sex workers and their other partners. To characterize the population of men who pay for sex in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), we analyzed population size, HIV prevalence, and use of HIV prevention and treatment. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed random-effects meta-analyses of population-based surveys conducted in SSA from 2000 to 2020 with information on paid sex by men. We extracted population size, lifetime number of sexual partners, condom use, HIV prevalence, HIV testing, antiretroviral (ARV) use, and viral load suppression (VLS) among sexually active men. We pooled by regions and time periods, and assessed time trends using meta-regressions. We included 87 surveys, totaling over 368,000 male respondents (15-54 years old), from 35 countries representing 95% of men in SSA. Eight percent (95% CI 6%-10%; number of surveys [Ns] = 87) of sexually active men reported ever paying for sex. Condom use at last paid sex increased over time and was 68% (95% CI 64%-71%; Ns = 61) in surveys conducted from 2010 onwards. Men who paid for sex had higher HIV prevalence (prevalence ratio [PR] = 1.50; 95% CI 1.31-1.72; Ns = 52) and were more likely to have ever tested for HIV (PR = 1.14; 95% CI 1.06-1.24; Ns = 81) than men who had not paid for sex. Men living with HIV who paid for sex had similar levels of lifetime HIV testing (PR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.88-1.05; Ns = 18), ARV use (PR = 1.01; 95% CI 0.86-1.18; Ns = 8), and VLS (PR = 1.00; 95% CI 0.86-1.17; Ns = 9) as those living with HIV who did not pay for sex. Study limitations include a reliance on self-report of sensitive behaviors and the small number of surveys with information on ARV use and VLS. CONCLUSIONS: Paying for sex is prevalent, and men who ever paid for sex were 50% more likely to be living with HIV compared to other men in the

Journal article

Nsanzimana S, Rwibasira G, Malamba SS, Musengimana G, Kayirangwa E, Jonnalagadda S, Fazito E, Eaton J, Mugisha V, Remera E, Semakula M, Mulindabigwi A, Omolo FJ, Wiesner L, Moore C, Patel H, Justman Jet al., 2022, HIV incidence and prevalence among adults aged 15-64 years in Rwanda: Results from the Rwanda Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (RPHIA) and District-level Modeling, 2019, International Journal of Infectious Diseases, Vol: 116, Pages: 245-254, ISSN: 1201-9712

ObjectivesThe 2018–19 Rwanda Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (RPHIA) was conducted to measure national HIV incidence and prevalence. District-level estimates were modeled to inform resources allocation.MethodsRPHIA was a nationally representative cross-sectional household survey. Consenting adults were interviewed and tested for HIV using the national diagnostic algorithm followed by laboratory-based confirmation of HIV status, and testing for viral load (VL), limiting antigen (LAg) avidity and presence of antiretrovirals. Incidence was calculated using normalized optical density ≤ 1•5, VL ≥ 1,000 copies/mL, and undetectable antiretrovirals. Survey and programmatic data were used to model district-level HIV incidence and prevalence.ResultsOf 31,028 eligible adults, 98•7% participated in RPHIA and 934 tested HIV positive. HIV prevalence among adults in Rwanda was 3•0% (95% CI:2•7–3•3). National HIV incidence was 0•08% (95% CI:0•02–0•14) and 0•11% (95% CI:0•00–0•26) in the City of Kigali (CoK). Based on district-level modeling, HIV incidence was greatest in the three CoK districts (0•11% to 0•15%) and varied across other districts (0•03% to 0•10%).ConclusionsHIV prevalence among adults in Rwanda is 3.0%; HIV incidence is low at 0.08%. District-level modeling has identified disproportionately affected urban hotspots: areas to focus resources.

Journal article

Jia K, Eilerts H, Edun O, Lam K, Howes A, Thomas M, Eaton Jet al., 2022, Risk scores for predicting HIV incidence among adult heterosexual populations in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Vol: 25, ISSN: 1758-2652

Introduction: Several HIV risk scores have been developed to identify individuals for prioritised HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. We systematically reviewed HIV risk scores to: (i) identify factors that consistently predicted incident HIV infection, (ii) review inclusion of community-level HIV risk in predictive models, and (iii) examine predictive performance. Methods: We searched nine databases from inception until February 15, 2021 for studies developing and/or validating HIV risk scores among the heterosexual adult population in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies not prospectively observing seroconversion or recruiting only key populations were excluded. Record screening, data extraction, and critical appraisal were conducted in duplicate. We used random-effects meta-analysis to summarise hazard ratios and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC). Results: From 1563 initial search records, we identified 14 risk scores in 13 studies. Seven studies were among sexually active women using contraceptives enrolled in randomised-controlled trials, three among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), and three among cohorts enrolling both men and women. Consistently identified HIV prognostic 51 factors among women were younger age (pooled adjusted hazard ratio: 1.62 [95% 52 Confidence Interval: 1.17, 2.23], compared to above-25), single/not cohabiting with primary partners (2.33 [1.73, 3.13]) and having sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at baseline (HSV-2: 1.67 [1.34, 2.09]; curable STIs: 1.45 [1.17; 1.79]). Among AGYW only STIs were consistently associated with higher incidence, but studies were limited (n=3). Community-level HIV prevalence or unsuppressed viral load strongly predicted incidence but were only considered in three of 11 multi-site studies. The AUC-ROC ranged from 0.56 to 0.79 on the model development sets. Only the VOICE score was externally validated by multiple studies, with pooled AUC-ROC 0.626 [0.588, 0.663] (I2: 64.0

Journal article

Nguyen VK, Eaton JW, 2021, A model for reconstructing trends and distribution in age at first sex from multiple household surveys with reporting biases, Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>Age at first sex (AFS) is a key indicator for monitoring sexual behaviour risk for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. Reporting of AFS data, however, suffer social-desirability and recall biases which obscure AFS trends and inferences constructed from it. We illustrated examples of the biases using data from multiple nationally-representative Demographic and Health Surveys household surveys conducted between 1992 and 2019 in Ethiopia (4 surveys), Guinea (4 surveys), Senegal (8 surveys), and Zambia (8 surveys). Based on this, we proposed a time-to-event, interval censored model for the AFS that uses overlapping reports by the same birth cohort in successive surveys to adjust reporting biases. The three-parameter log-skew-logistic distribution described the asymmetric and nonmonotonic hazard exhibited by empirical AFS data. In cross-validation analysis, incorporating a term for AFS reporting bias as a function of age improved model predictions for the trend of AFS over birth cohorts. The interquartile range for the AFS was 16 years to 23 years for Ethiopian and Senegalese women and 15 years to 20 years for Guinean and Zambian men. Median AFS increased by around one to 1.5 years between the 1960 and 1989 birth cohorts for all four datasets. Younger male respondents tended to report a younger AFS while female respondents tended to report an older AFS than when asked in later surveys. Above age 30, both male and female respondents tended to report older AFS compared to when surveyed in their late twenties. Simulations validated that the model recovers the trend in AFS over birth cohorts in the presence of reporting biases. At least three surveys are needed to obtain reliable trend estimate for a 20-years trend. Mis-specified reference age at which reporting is assumed unbiased did not affect the trend estimate but resulted in biased estimates for the median AFS in the most recent birth cohorts.</jats:p>

Working paper

Edun O, Shenderovich Y, Zhou S, Toska E, Okell L, Eaton JW, Cluver Let al., 2021, Predictors and consequences of HIV status disclosure to adolescents living with HIV in Eastern Cape, South Africa

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Introduction</jats:title><jats:p>The World Health Organization recommends full disclosure of HIV-positive status to adolescents who acquired HIV perinatally (APHIV) by age 12. However, even among adolescents (aged 10-19) already on antiretroviral therapy (ART), disclosure rates are low. Caregivers often report the child being too young and fear of disclosure worsening adolescents’ mental health as reasons for non-disclosure. Evidence is limited about predictors of disclosure and its association with adherence, viral suppression, and mental health outcomes among adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Analyses included three rounds (2014-2018) of data collected among a closed cohort of adolescents living with HIV in Eastern Cape, South Africa. We used logistic regression with respondent random-effects to identify factors associated with disclosure, and assess differences in ART adherence, viral suppression, and mental health symptoms between adolescents by disclosure status. We also explored differences in the change in mental health symptoms and ART adherence between study rounds and disclosure groups with logistic regression.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>813 APHIV were interviewed at baseline, of whom 769 (94.6%) and 729 (89.7%) were interviewed at the second and third rounds, respectively. The proportion aware of their HIV-positive status increased from 63.1% at the first round to 85.5% by the third round. Older age (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 1.24; 1.07 – 1.43) and living in an urban location (aOR: 2.76; 1.67 – 4.45) were associated with disclosure between interviews. There was no association between awareness of HIV-positive status and ART adherence, viral suppression, or mental hea

Journal article

Stapley J, Davis K, Dadirai T, Moorhouse L, Eaton J, Maswera R, Nyamukapa C, Gregson Set al., 2021, Impact of community-level ART coverage on HIV-related stigmatising attitude within a general population cohort in Manicaland, east Zimbabwe; a longitudinal study, 12th Annual International Conference on Stigma

Conference paper

Tlhajoane M, Dzamatira F, Kadzura N, Nyamukapa C, Eaton JW, Gregson Set al., 2021, Incidence and predictors of attrition among patients receiving ART in eastern Zimbabwe before, and after the introduction of universal ‘treat-all’ policies: A competing risk analysis, PLOS Global Public Health, Vol: 1, Pages: 1-15

As HIV treatment is expanded, attention is focused on minimizing attrition from care. We evaluated the impact of treat-all policies on the incidence and determinants of attrition amongst clients receiving ART in eastern Zimbabwe. Data were retrospectively collected from the medical records of adult patients (aged≥18 years) enrolled into care from July 2015 to June 2016—pre-treat-all era, and July 2016 to June 2017—treat-all era, selected from 12 purposively sampled health facilities. Attrition was defined as an absence from care >90 days following ART initiation. Survival-time methods were used to derive incidence rates (IRs), and competing risk regression used in bivariate and multivariable modelling. In total, 829 patients had newly initiated ART and were included in the analysis (pre-treat-all 30.6%; treat-all 69.4%). Incidence of attrition (per 1000 person-days) increased between the two time periods (pre-treat-all IR = 1.18 (95%CI: 0.90–1.56) versus treat-all period IR = 1.62 (95%CI: 1.37–1.91)). In crude analysis, patients at increased risk of attrition were those enrolled into care during the treat-all period, <34 years of age, WHO stage I at enrolment, and had initiated ART on the same day as HIV diagnosis. After accounting for mediating clinical characteristics, the difference in attrition between the pre-treat-all, and treat-all periods ceased to be statistically significant. In a full multivariable model, attrition was significantly higher amongst same-day ART initiates (aSHR = 1.47, 95%CI:1.05–2.06). Implementation of treat-all policies was associated with an increased incidence of ART attrition, driven largely by ART initiation on the same day as HIV diagnosis which increased significantly in the treat all period. Differentiated adherence counselling for patients at increased risk of attrition, and improved access to clinical monitoring may improve retention in care.

Journal article

Jahagirdar D, Walters MK, Novotney A, Brewer ED, Frank TD, Carter A, Biehl MH, Abbastabar H, Abhilash ES, Abu-Gharbieh E, Abu-Raddad LJ, Adekanmbi V, Adeyinka DA, Adnani QES, Afzal S, Aghababaei S, Ahinkorah BO, Ahmad S, Ahmadi K, Ahmadi S, Ahmadpour E, Ahmed MB, Ahmed Rashid T, Ahmed Salih Y, Aklilu A, Akram T, Akunna CJ, Al Hamad H, Alahdab F, Alanezi FM, Aleksandrova EA, Alene KA, Ali L, Alipour V, Almustanyir S, Alvis-Guzman N, Ameyaw EK, Amu H, Andrei CL, Andrei T, Anvari D, Arabloo J, Aremu O, Arulappan J, Atnafu DD, Ayala Quintanilla BP, Ayza MA, Azari S, B DB, Banach M, Bärnighausen TW, Barra F, Barrow A, Basu S, Bazargan-Hejazi S, Belay HG, Berheto TM, Bezabhe WM, Bezabih YM, Bhagavathula AS, Bhardwaj N, Bhardwaj P, Bhattacharyya K, Bibi S, Bijani A, Bisignano C, Bolarinwa OA, Boloor A, Boltaev AA, Briko NI, Buonsenso D, Burkart K, Butt ZA, Cao C, Charan J, Chatterjee S, Chattu SK, Chattu VK, Choudhari SG, Chu D-T, Couto RAS, Cowden RG, Dachew BA, Dadras O, Dagnew AB, Dahlawi SMA, Dai X, Dandona L, Dandona R, das Neves J, Degenhardt L, Demeke FM, Desta AA, Deuba K, Dhamnetiya D, Dhungana GP, Dianatinasab M, Diaz D, Djalalinia S, Doan LP, Dorostkar F, Edinur HA, Effiong A, Eftekharzadeh S, El Sayed Zaki M, Elayedath R, Elhadi M, El-Jaafary SI, El-Khatib Z, Elsharkawy A, Endalamaw A, Endries AY, Eskandarieh S, Ezeonwumelu IJ, Ezzikouri S, Farahmand M, Faraon EJA, Fasanmi AO, Ferrero S, Ferro Desideri L, Filip I, Fischer F, Folayan MO, Foroutan M, Fukumoto T, Gad MM, Gadanya MA, Gaidhane AM, Garg T, Gayesa RT, Gebreyohannes EA, Gesesew HA, Getachew Obsa A, Ghadiri K, Ghashghaee A, Gilani SA, Ginindza TG, Glavan I-R, Glushkova EV, Golechha M, Gugnani HC, Gupta B, Gupta S, Gupta VB, Gupta VK, Hamidi S, Handanagic S, Haque S, Harapan H, Hargono A, Hasaballah AI, Hashi A, Hassan S, Hassanipour S, Hayat K, Heredia-Pi I, Hezam K, Holla R, Hoogar P, Hoque ME, Hosseini M, Hosseinzadeh M, Hsairi M, Hussain R, Ibitoye SE, Idrisov B, Ikuta KS, Ilesanmi OS, Ilic IM, Ilicet al., 2021, Global, regional, and national sex-specific burden and control of the HIV epidemic, 1990–2019, for 204 countries and territories: the Global Burden of Diseases Study 2019, The Lancet HIV, Vol: 8, Pages: e633-e651, ISSN: 2352-3018

BackgroundThe sustainable development goals (SDGs) aim to end HIV/AIDS as a public health threat by 2030. Understanding the current state of the HIV epidemic and its change over time is essential to this effort. This study assesses the current sex-specific HIV burden in 204 countries and territories and measures progress in the control of the epidemic.MethodsTo estimate age-specific and sex-specific trends in 48 of 204 countries, we extended the Estimation and Projection Package Age-Sex Model to also implement the spectrum paediatric model. We used this model in cases where age and sex specific HIV-seroprevalence surveys and antenatal care-clinic sentinel surveillance data were available. For the remaining 156 of 204 locations, we developed a cohort-incidence bias adjustment to derive incidence as a function of cause-of-death data from vital registration systems. The incidence was input to a custom Spectrum model. To assess progress, we measured the percentage change in incident cases and deaths between 2010 and 2019 (threshold >75% decline), the ratio of incident cases to number of people living with HIV (incidence-to-prevalence ratio threshold <0·03), and the ratio of incident cases to deaths (incidence-to-mortality ratio threshold <1·0).FindingsIn 2019, there were 36·8 million (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 35·1–38·9) people living with HIV worldwide. There were 0·84 males (95% UI 0·78–0·91) per female living with HIV in 2019, 0·99 male infections (0·91–1·10) for every female infection, and 1·02 male deaths (0·95–1·10) per female death. Global progress in incident cases and deaths between 2010 and 2019 was driven by sub-Saharan Africa (with a 28·52% decrease in incident cases, 95% UI 19·58–35·43, and a 39·66% decrease in deaths, 36·49–42·36). Elsewhere, the incidence remained stabl

Journal article

Jia KM, Eilerts H, Edun O, Lam K, Howes A, Thomas ML, Eaton JWet al., 2021, Risk scores for predicting HIV incidence among adult heterosexual populations in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review and meta-analysis

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Introduction</jats:title><jats:p>Several HIV risk scores have been developed to identify individuals for prioritised HIV prevention in sub-Saharan Africa. We systematically reviewed HIV risk scores to: (i) identify factors that consistently predicted incident HIV infection, (ii) review inclusion of community-level HIV risk in predictive models, and (iii) examine predictive performance.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>We searched nine databases from inception until February 15, 2021 for studies developing and/or validating HIV risk scores among the heterosexual adult population in sub-Saharan Africa. Studies not prospectively observing seroconversion or recruiting only key populations were excluded. Record screening, data extraction, and critical appraisal were conducted in duplicate. We used random-effects meta-analysis to summarise hazard ratios and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>From 1563 initial search records, we identified 14 risk scores in 13 studies. Seven studies were among sexually active women using contraceptives enrolled in randomised-controlled trials, three among adolescent girls and young women (AGYW), and three among cohorts enrolling both men and women. Consistently identified HIV prognostic factors among women were younger age (pooled adjusted hazard ratio: 1.62 [95% Confidence Interval: 1.17, 2.23], compared to above-25), single/not cohabiting with primary partners (2.33 [1.73, 3.13]) and having sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at baseline (HSV-2: 1.67 [1.34, 2.09]; curable STIs: 1.45 [1.17; 1.79]). Among AGYW only STIs were consistently associated with higher incidence, but studies were limited (n=3). Community-level HIV prevalence or uns

Journal article

Eaton J, Dwyer-Lindgren L, Gutreuter S, O'Driscoll M, Stevens O, Bajaj S, Ashton R, Hill A, Russell E, Esra R, Dolan N, Anifowoshe Y, Woodbridge M, Fellows I, Glaubius R, Haeuser E, Okonek T, Stover J, Thomas M, Wakefield J, Wolock T, Berry J, Sabala T, Heard N, Delgado S, Jahn A, Kalua T, Chimpandule T, Auld A, Kim E, Payne D, Johnson LF, Fitzjohn R, Wanyeki I, Mahy M, Shiraishi RWet al., 2021, Naomi: a new modelling tool for estimating HIV epidemic indicators at the district level in Sub-Saharan Africa, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Vol: 24, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1758-2652

Introduction: HIV planning requires granular estimates for the number of people living withHIV (PLHIV), antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage and unmet need, and new HIVinfections by district, or equivalent subnational administrative level. We developed aBayesian small-area estimation model, called Naomi, to estimate these quantities stratifiedby subnational administrative units, sex, and five-year age groups.Methods: Small-area regressions for HIV prevalence, ART coverage, and HIV incidencewere jointly calibrated using subnational household survey data on all three indicators,routine antenatal service delivery data on HIV prevalence and ART coverage amongpregnant women, and service delivery data on the number of PLHIV receiving ART.Incidence was modelled by district-level HIV prevalence and ART coverage. Model outputsof counts and rates for each indicator were aggregated to multiple geographic anddemographic stratifications of interest. The model was estimated in an empirical Bayesframework, furnishing probabilistic uncertainty ranges for all output indicators. Exampleresults were presented using data from Malawi during 2016 to 2018.Results: Adult HIV prevalence in September 2018 ranged from 3.2% to 17.1% acrossMalawi’s districts and was higher in southern districts and in metropolitan areas. ARTcoverage was more homogenous, ranging from 75% to 82%. The largest number of PLHIVwere among ages 35-39 for both women and men, while the most untreated PLHIV wereamong ages 25-29 for women and 30-34 for men. Relative uncertainty was larger for theuntreated PLHIV than the number on ART or total PLHIV. Among clients receiving ART atfacilities in Lilongwe City, an estimated 71% (95% CI 61–79%) resided in Lilongwe City, 20%(14–27%) in Lilongwe district outside the metropolis, and 9% (6–12%) in neighbouring Dowadistrict. Thirty-eight percent (26–50%) of Lilongwe Rural residents and 39% (27–50%) ofDowa residents received treatment at facilit

Journal article

Mahiane SG, Eaton J, Glaubius R, Case KK, Sabin K, Marsh Ket al., 2021, Updates to Spectrum’s Case Surveillance and Vital Registration tool for HIV estimates and projections, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Vol: 24, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 1758-2652

Introduction: The Case Surveillance and Vital Registration (CSAVR) model within Spectrum estimates HIV incidence trends from surveillance data on numbers of new HIV diagnoses and HIV-related deaths. This article describes developments of the CSAVR tool to more flexibly model diagnosis rates over time, estimate incidence patterns by sex and age group, and by key population group. Methods: We modelled HIV diagnosis rate trends as a mixture of three factors, including temporal and opportunistic infection components. The tool was expanded to estimate incidence rate ratios by sex and age for countries with disaggregated reporting of new HIV diagnoses and AIDS deaths, and to account for information on key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM), males who inject drugs (MWID), female sex workers (FSW) and females who inject drugs (FWID). We used a Bayesian framework to calibrate the tool in 71 high-income or low HIV burden countries. Results: Across countries, an estimated median 89% (interquartile range [IQR] 78%-96%) of HIV-positive adults knew their status in 2019. Mean CD4 counts at diagnosis were stable over time, with a median of 456 cells/μl (IQR: 391-508) across countries in 2019. In European countries reporting new HIV diagnoses among key populations median estimated proportions of males that are MSM and MWID was 1.3% (IQR: 0.9%- 2.0%) and 0.56% (IQR: 0.51%- 0.64%), respectively. The median estimated proportions of females that are FSW and FWID were 0.36% (IQR: 0.27%-0.45%) and 0.14 (IQR: 0.13%- 0.15%), respectively. HIV incidence per 100 person-year increased among MSM with median estimates reaching 0.43 (IQR: 0.29-1.73) in 2019, but remained stable in MWID, FSW and FWID, at around 0.12 (IQR: 0.04-1.9), 0.09 (IQR: 0.06-0.69) and 0.13% (IQR: 0.08%-0.91%) in 2019, respectively. Knowledge of HIV status among HIV-positive adults gradually increased since the early 1990s to exceed 75% in more than 75% of countries in 2019 among each key population. Con

Journal article

Glaubius R, Kothegal N, Birhanu S, Jonnalagadda S, Mahiane SG, Johnson LF, Brown T, Stover J, Mangal T, Pantazis N, Eaton Jet al., 2021, Disease progression and mortality with untreated HIV infection: evidence synthesis of HIV seroconverter cohorts, antiretroviral treatment clinical cohorts, and population-based survey data, Journal of the International AIDS Society, Vol: 24, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1758-2652

Background: Model-based estimates of key HIV indicators depend on past epidemic trends that arederived based on assumptions about HIV disease progression and mortality in the absence ofantiretroviral treatment (ART). Population-based HIV Impact Assessment (PHIA) household surveysconducted between 2015 and 2018 found substantial numbers of respondents living with untreated HIVinfection. CD4 cell counts measured in these individuals provide novel information to estimate HIVdisease progression and mortality rates off ART.Methods: We used Bayesian multi-parameter evidence synthesis to combine data on i) cross-sectionalCD4 cell counts among untreated adults living with HIV from ten PHIA surveys, ii) survival after HIVseroconversion in East African seroconverter cohorts, and iii) post-seroconversion CD4 counts and iv)mortality rates by CD4 count predominantly from European, North American, and Australianseroconverter cohorts. We used Incremental Mixture Importance Sampling to estimate HIV naturalhistory and ART uptake parameters used in the Spectrum software. We validated modeled trends in CD4count at ART initiation against ART initiator cohorts in sub-Saharan Africa.Results: Median untreated HIV survival decreased with increasing age at seroconversion, from 12.5years (95% credible interval [CrI]: 12.1-12.7) at ages 15-24 to 7.2 years (95% CrI: 7.1-7.7) at ages 45-54.Older age was associated with lower initial CD4 counts, faster CD4 count decline and higher HIV-relatedmortality rates. Our estimates suggested a weaker association between ART uptake and HIV-relatedmortality rates than previously assumed in Spectrum. Modeled CD4 counts in untreated people livingwith HIV matched recent household survey data well, though some intercountry variation in frequenciesof CD4 counts above 500 cells/mm3 was not explained. Trends in CD4 counts at ART initiation werecomparable to data from ART initiator cohorts. An alternate model that stratified progression andmortality rates by sex di

Journal article

Godin A, Eaton J, Giguere K, Marsh K, Johnson L, Jahn A, Mbofana F, Ehui E, Maheu-Giroux Met al., 2021, Inferring population HIV incidence trends from surveillance data of recent HIV infection among HIV testing clients, AIDS, Vol: 35, Pages: 2383-2388, ISSN: 0269-9370

Background: Measuring recent HIV infections from routine surveillance systems could allow timely and granular monitoring of HIV incidence patterns. We evaluated the relationship of two recent infection indicators with alternative denominators to true incidence patterns.Methods: We used a mathematical model of HIV testing behaviors, calibrated to population-based surveys and HIV testing services program data, to estimate the number of recent infections diagnosed annually from 2010 to 2019 in Côte d’Ivoire, Malawi, and Mozambique. We compared two different denominators to interpret recency data: i) those at risk of HIV acquisition (HIV-negative tests plus recent infections) and ii) all people testing HIV positive. Sex- and age-specific longitudinal trends in both interpretations were then compared to modeled trends in HIV incidence, testing efforts, and HIV positivity among HIV testing services clients.Results: Over 2010–2019, the annual proportion of the eligible population tested increased in all countries, while positivity decreased. The proportion of recent infections among those at risk of HIV acquisition decreased, similar to declines in HIV incidence among adults (≥15 years old). Conversely, the proportion of recent infections among HIV-positive tests increased. The female-to-male ratio of the proportion testing recent among those at risk was closer to 1 than the true incidence sex ratio.Conclusion: The proportion of recent infections among those at risk of HIV acquisition is more indicative of HIV incidence than the proportion among HIV-positive tests. However, interpreting the observed patterns as surrogate measures for incidence patterns may still be confounded by different HIV testing rates between population groups or over time.

Journal article

Risher K, Cori A, Reniers G, Marston M, Calvert C, Crampin A, Dadirai T, Dube A, Gregson S, Herbst K, Lutalo T, Moorhouse L, Mtenga B, Nabukalu D, Newton R, Price AJ, Tlhajoane M, Todd J, Tomlin K, Urassa M, Vandormael A, Fraser C, Slaymaker E, Eaton Jet al., 2021, Age patterns of HIV incidence in eastern and southern Africa: a collaborative analysis of observational general population cohort studies, The Lancet HIV, Vol: 8, Pages: e429-e439, ISSN: 2405-4704

Background: As the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa matures, evidence about the age distribution of new HIV infections and how this has changed over the epidemic is needed to guide HIV prevention. We assessed trends in age-specific HIV incidence in six population-based cohort studies in eastern and southern Africa, reporting changes in average age at infection, age distribution of new infections, and birth cohort cumulative incidence. Methods: We used a Bayesian model to reconstruct age-specific HIV incidence from repeated observations of individuals’ HIV serostatus and survival collected among population HIV cohorts in rural Malawi, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The HIV incidence rate by age, time and sex was modelled using smooth splines functions. Incidence trends were estimated separately by sex and study. Estimated incidence and prevalence results for 2000-2017, standardised to study population distribution, were used to estimate average age at infection and proportion of new infections by age. Findings: Age-specific incidence declined at all ages, though the timing and pattern of decline varied by study. The average age at infection was higher in men (cohort means: 27·8-34·6 years) than women (cohort means: 24·8-29·6 years). Between 2000 and 2017, the average age at infection increased slightly: cohort means 0·5-2·8 years among men and -0·2-2·5 years among women. Across studies, between 38-63%(cohort means)of women’s infections were among 15-24-year-olds and between 30-63% of men’s infections were in 20-29-year-olds. Lifetime risk of HIV declined for successive birth cohorts. Interpretation: HIV incidence declined in all age groups and shifted slightly, but not dramatically, to older ages. Disproportionate new HIV infections occur among 15-24-year-old 4women and20-29-year-oldmen, supporting focused prevention in these groups. But 40-60% of infections were outside these

Journal article

Wolock T, Flaxman S, Risher K, Dadirai T, Gregson S, Eaton Jet al., 2021, Evaluating distributional regression strategies for modelling self-reported sexual age-mixing, eLife, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-38, ISSN: 2050-084X

The age dynamics of sexual partnership formation determine patterns of sexually transmitted disease transmission and have long been a focus of researchers studying human immunodeficiency virus. Data on self-reported sexual partner age distributions are available from a variety of sources. We sought to explore statistical models that accurately predict the distribution of sexual partner ages over age and sex. We identified which probability distributions and outcome specifications best captured variation in partner age and quantified the benefits of modelling these data using distributional regression. We found that distributional regression with a sinh-arcsinh distribution replicated observed partner age distributions most accurately across three geographically diverse data sets. This framework can be extended with well-known hierarchical modelling tools and can help improve estimates of sexual age-mixing dynamics.

Journal article

Sartorius B, VanderHeide JD, Yang M, Goosmann EA, Hon J, Haeuser E, Cork MA, Perkins S, Jahagirdar D, Schaeffer LE, Serfes AL, LeGrand KE, Abbastabar H, Abebo ZH, Abosetugn AE, Abu-Gharbieh E, Accrombessi MMK, Adebayo OM, Adegbosin AE, Adekanmbi V, Adetokunboh OO, Adeyinka DA, Ahinkorah BO, Ahmadi K, Ahmed MB, Akalu Y, Akinyemi OO, Akinyemi RO, Aklilu A, Akunna CJ, Alahdab F, Al-Aly Z, Alam N, Alamneh AA, Alanzi TM, Alemu BW, Alhassan RK, Ali T, Alipour V, Amini S, Ancuceanu R, Ansari F, Anteneh ZA, Anvari D, Anwer R, Appiah SCY, Arabloo J, Asemahagn MA, Asghari Jafarabadi M, Asmare WN, Atnafu DD, Atout MMW, Atreya A, Ausloos M, Awedew AF, Ayala Quintanilla BP, Ayanore MA, Aynalem YA, Ayza MA, Azari S, Azene ZN, Babar Z-U-D, Baig AA, Balakrishnan S, Banach M, Bärnighausen TW, Basu S, Bayati M, Bedi N, Bekuma TT, Bezabhe WMM, Bhagavathula AS, Bhardwaj P, Bhattacharyya K, Bhutta ZA, Bibi S, Bikbov B, Birhan TA, Bitew ZW, Bockarie MJ, Boloor A, Brady OJ, Bragazzi NL, Briko AN, Briko NI, Burugina Nagaraja S, Butt ZA, Cárdenas R, Carvalho F, Charan J, Chatterjee S, Chattu SK, Chattu VK, Chowdhury MAK, Chu D-T, Cook AJ, Cormier NM, Cowden RG, Culquichicon C, Dagnew B, Dahlawi SMA, Damiani G, Daneshpajouhnejad P, Daoud F, Daryani A, das Neves J, Davis Weaver N, Derbew Molla M, Deribe K, Desta AA, Deuba K, Dharmaratne SD, Dhungana GP, Diaz D, Djalalinia S, Doku PN, Dubljanin E, Duko B, Eagan AW, Earl L, Eaton JW, Effiong A, El Sayed Zaki M, El Tantawi M, Elayedath R, El-Jaafary SI, Elsharkawy A, Eskandarieh S, Eyawo O, Ezzikouri S, Fasanmi AO, Fasil A, Fauk NK, Feigin VL, Ferede TY, Fernandes E, Fischer F, Foigt NA, Folayan MO, Foroutan M, Francis JM, Fukumoto T, Gad MM, Geberemariyam BS, Gebregiorgis BG, Gebremichael B, Gesesew HA, Getacher L, Ghadiri K, Ghashghaee A, Gilani SA, Ginindza TG, Glagn M, Golechha M, Gona PN, Gubari MIM, Gugnani HC, Guido D, Guled RA, Hall BJ, Hamidi S, Handiso DW, Hargono A, Hashi A, Hassanipour S, Hassankhani H, Hayat K, Herteliu C, Hidru HDDet al., 2021, Subnational mapping of HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000–18: a modelling study, The Lancet HIV, Vol: 8, Pages: e363-e375, ISSN: 2352-3018

BackgroundHigh-resolution estimates of HIV burden across space and time provide an important tool for tracking and monitoring the progress of prevention and control efforts and assist with improving the precision and efficiency of targeting efforts. We aimed to assess HIV incidence and HIV mortality for all second-level administrative units across sub-Saharan Africa.MethodsIn this modelling study, we developed a framework that used the geographically specific HIV prevalence data collected in seroprevalence surveys and antenatal care clinics to train a model that estimates HIV incidence and mortality among individuals aged 15–49 years. We used a model-based geostatistical framework to estimate HIV prevalence at the second administrative level in 44 countries in sub-Saharan Africa for 2000–18 and sought data on the number of individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) by second-level administrative unit. We then modified the Estimation and Projection Package (EPP) to use these HIV prevalence and treatment estimates to estimate HIV incidence and mortality by second-level administrative unit.FindingsThe estimates suggest substantial variation in HIV incidence and mortality rates both between and within countries in sub-Saharan Africa, with 15 countries having a ten-times or greater difference in estimated HIV incidence between the second-level administrative units with the lowest and highest estimated incidence levels. Across all 44 countries in 2018, HIV incidence ranged from 2·8 (95% uncertainty interval 2·1–3·8) in Mauritania to 1585·9 (1369·4–1824·8) cases per 100 000 people in Lesotho and HIV mortality ranged from 0·8 (0·7–0·9) in Mauritania to 676·5 (513·6–888·0) deaths per 100 000 people in Lesotho. Variation in both incidence and mortality was substantially greater at the subnational level than at the national level and the highest estimated ra

Journal article

Ehrenkranz P, Rosen S, Boulle A, Eaton J, Fox MP, Ford N, Grimsrud A, Rice BD, Sikazwe I, Holmes CBet al., 2021, The revolving door of HIV care: revising the service delivery cascade to achieve the UNAIDS 95-95-95 goals, PLoS Medicine, Vol: 18, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1548-7091

Journal article

Giguere K, Eaton J, Marsh K, Johnson L, Johnson CC, Ehui E, Jahn A, Wanyeki I, Mbofana F, Bakiono F, Mahy M, Maheu-Giroux Met al., 2021, Trends in knowledge of HIV status and efficiency of HIV testing services in sub-Saharan Africa, 2000-20: a modelling study using survey and HIV testing programme data, The Lancet HIV, Vol: 8, Pages: 284-293, ISSN: 2405-4704

Background: Monitoring knowledge of HIV status (KOS) among people living with HIV (PLHIV) is essential for an effective national HIV response. This study estimates progress and gaps in reaching the UNAIDS 2020 target of 90% KOS, and the efficiency of HIV testing services (HTS) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), where two thirds of all PLHIV live. Methods: We used data from 183 population-based surveys (N=2·7 million participants) and national HTS programs (N=315 country-years) from 40 countries as inputs into a mathematical model to examine trends in KOS among PLHIV, median time from HIV infection to diagnosis, HIV testing positivity, and proportion of new diagnoses among all positive tests, adjusting for retesting.Findings: Across SSA, KOS steadily increased from 6% (95% credible interval [95%CrI]: 5% to 7%) in 2000 to 84% (95%CrI: 82% to 86%) in 2020. Twelve countries and one region, Southern Africa, reached the 90% target. In 2020, KOS was lower among men (79%) than women (87%) across SSA. PLHIV aged 15-24 years were the least likely to know their status (65%), but the largest gap in terms of absolute numbers was among men aged 35-49 years, with over 700,000 left undiagnosed. As KOS increased from 2000 to 2020, the median time to diagnosis decreased from 10 to 3 years, HIV testing positivity declined from 9% to 3%, and the proportion of first-time diagnoses among all positive tests dropped from 89% to 42%.Interpretation: On the path towards the next UNAIDS target of 95% diagnostic coverage by 2030, and in a context of declining positivity and yield of first-time diagnoses, we need to focus on addressing disparities in KOS. Increasing KOS and treatment coverage among older men could be critical to reduce HIV incidence among women in SSA, and by extension, reducing mother-to-child transmission.

Journal article

Eaton JW, Sands A, Barr-DiChiara M, Jamil MS, Baggaley R, Tippett Barr BA, Kalua T, Jahn A, Maheu-Giroux M, Johnson CCet al., 2021, Accuracy and performance of the WHO 2015 and WHO 2019 HIV testing strategies across epidemic settings

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>WHO 2019 HIV testing guidelines recommended a standard HIV testing strategy consisting of three consecutively HIV-reactive test results on serology assays to diagnose HIV infection. National HIV programmes in high prevalence settings currently using the strategy consisting of only two consecutive HIV-reactive tests should consider when to implement the new guideline recommendations.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods and Findings</jats:title><jats:p>We implemented a probability model to simulate outcomes of WHO 2019 and the two strategies recommended by WHO 2015 guidelines on HIV testing services. Each assay in the strategy was assumed independently 99% sensitivity and 98% specificity, the minimal thresholds required for WHO prequalification. For each strategy and positivity ranging 20% to 0.2%, we calculated the number of false-negative, false-positive, and inconclusive results; positive and negative predictive value (PPV, NPV); number of each assay used, and testing programme costs. We found that the NPV was above 99.9% for all scenarios modelled. Under the WHO 2015 two-test strategy, the PPV was below the 99% target threshold when positivity fell below 5%. For the WHO 2019 strategy, the PPV was above 99% for all positivity levels. The number reported ‘inconclusive’ was higher under the WHO 2019 strategy. Implementing the WHO 2019 testing strategy in Malawi, would require around 89,000 A3 tests in 2021, compared to 175,000 A2 tests and over 4.5 million A1 tests per year. The incremental cost of the WHO 2019 strategy was less than 2% in 2021 and declined to 0.9% in 2025.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>As positivity among persons testing for HIV reduces below 5% in nearly all settings, implementation of the W

Journal article

Eilerts H, Prieto JR, Eaton J, Reniers Get al., 2021, Age patterns of under-five mortality in sub-Saharan Africa during 1990-2018: a comparison of estimates from demographic surveillance with full birth histories and the historic record, Demographic Research, Vol: 44, Pages: 415-442, ISSN: 1435-9871

BACKGROUND: In Sub-Saharan African countries which often lack high-quality vital registration data, estimates of under-five mortality (U5M) rely heavily on full birth histories (FBHs) collected in surveys and model age patterns of mortality calibrated against vital statistics from other populations. Health and Demographic Surveillance Systems (HDSS) are al-ternate sources of population-based data in much of sub-Saharan Africa, which are less formally utilized in estimation. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study is to compare the age pattern of U5M in African HDSS with FBHs from the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) and Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS), the Human Mortality Database (HMD), and model age patterns.METHODS: We examined the relative levels of neonatal, post neonatal, infant, and child mortality across data sources. We directly compared estimates for DHS and MICS subnational regions with HDSS, and used OLS regression to identify data attributes that correlated with the disparity between estimates. RESULTSH: DSS and FBH data suggests that African populations have higher levels of child mortality and lower infant mortality than the historic record. This age pattern is most explicit for Western African populations, but also characterizes data for other sub regions. The comparison between HDSS and FBH suggests that FBH child mortality is biased downward. The comparison is less conclusive for neonatal and infant mortality. CONTRIBUTION: This study questions the practice of using model age patterns derived from largely high-income settings for inferring or correcting U5M estimates for African populations. It also highlights the considerable uncertainty around the consistency of HDSS and FBH estimates of U5M.

Journal article

Xia Y, Milwid RM, Godin A, Boily M-C, Johnson LF, Marsh K, Eaton J, Maheu-Giroux Met al., 2021, Accuracy of self-reported HIV testing history and awareness of HIV-positive status among people living with HIV in four Sub-Saharan African countries, AIDS, Vol: 35, Pages: 503-510, ISSN: 0269-9370

Background: In many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, self-reported HIV testing history and awareness of HIV-positive status from household surveys are used to estimate the percentage of people living with HIV (PLHIV) who know their HIV status. Despite widespread use, there is limited empirical information on the sensitivity of those self-reports, which can be affected by non-disclosure.Methods: Bayesian latent class models were used to estimate the sensitivity of self-reported HIV testing history and awareness of HIV-positive status in four Population-based HIV Impact Assessment surveys in Eswatini, Malawi, Tanzania, and Zambia. Antiretroviral (ARV) metabolites biomarkers were used to identify persons on treatment who did not accurately report their status. For those without ARV biomarkers, the pooled estimate of non-disclosure among untreated persons was 1.48 higher than those on treatment.Results: Among PLHIV, the model-estimated sensitivity of self-reported HIV testing history ranged from 96% to 99% across surveys. The model-estimated sensitivity of self-reported awareness of HIV status varied from 91% to 97%. Non-disclosure was generally higher among men and those aged 15–24 years. Adjustments for imperfect sensitivity did not substantially influence estimates of PLHIV ever tested (difference <4%) but the proportion of PLHIV aware of their HIV-positive status was higher than the unadjusted proportion (difference <8%).Conclusions: Self-reported HIV testing histories in four Eastern and Southern African countries are generally robust although adjustment for non-disclosure increases estimated awareness of status. These findings can contribute to further refinements in methods for monitoring progress along the HIV testing and treatment cascade.

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00567462&limit=30&person=true