Imperial College London

MsJessicaSmith

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Operations Manager
 
 
 
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+44 (0)20 7594 2594jessica.smith1

 
 
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Stadium HouseWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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27 results found

Allen AR, Smith J, Hobbs MJ, Loughnan SA, Sharrock M, Newby JM, Andrews G, Mahoney AEJet al., 2022, Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: a randomised controlled trial and outcomes in routine care, BEHAVIOURAL AND COGNITIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY, Vol: 50, Pages: 649-655, ISSN: 1352-4658

Journal article

Furukawa T, Suganuma A, Ostinelli E, Andersson G, Beevers C, Shumake J, Berger T, Willemijn Boele F, Buntrock C, Carlbring P, Choi I, Christensen H, Mackinnon A, Dahne J, Huibers M, Ebert D, Farrer L, Forand N, Strunk D, Ezawa I, Forsell E, Kaldo V, Geraedts A, Gilbody S, Littlewood E, Brabyn S, Hadjistavropoulos H, Schneider L, Johansson R, Kenter R, Kivi M, Björkelund C, Kleiboer A, Riper H, Philipp Klein J, Schröder J, Meyer B, Moritz S, Bücker L, Lintvedt O, Lundgren J, Milgrom J, Gemmill A, Mohr D, Montero-Marin J, Garcia-Campayo J, Nobis S, Zarski A-C, O'Moore K, Williams A, Newby J, Perini S, Phillips R, Schneider J, Pots W, Pugh N, Richards D, Rosso I, Rauch S, Sheeber L, Smith J, Spek V, Pop V, Burcin U, van Bastelaar K, van Luenen S, Garnefski N, Kraaij V, Vernmark K, Warmerdam L, van Straten A, Zagorscak P, Knaevelsrud C, Heinrich M, Miguel C, Cipriani A, Efthimiou O, Karyotaki E, Cuijpers Pet al., 2021, Dismantling, optimising, and personalising internet cognitive behavioural therapy for depression: a systematic review and component network meta-analysis using individual participant data, The Lancet Psychiatry, Vol: 8, Pages: 500-511, ISSN: 2215-0366

BackgroundInternet cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) is a viable delivery format of CBT for depression. However, iCBT programmes include training in a wide array of cognitive and behavioural skills via different delivery methods, and it remains unclear which of these components are more efficacious and for whom.MethodsWe did a systematic review and individual participant data component network meta-analysis (cNMA) of iCBT trials for depression. We searched PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, and the Cochrane Library for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) published from database inception to Jan 1, 2019, that compared any form of iCBT against another or a control condition in the acute treatment of adults (aged ≥18 years) with depression. Studies with inpatients or patients with bipolar depression were excluded. We sought individual participant data from the original authors. When these data were unavailable, we used aggregate data. Two independent researchers identified the included components. The primary outcome was depression severity, expressed as incremental mean difference (iMD) in the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) scores when a component is added to a treatment. We developed a web app that estimates relative efficacies between any two combinations of components, given baseline patient characteristics. This study is registered in PROSPERO, CRD42018104683.FindingsWe identified 76 RCTs, including 48 trials contributing individual participant data (11 704 participants) and 28 trials with aggregate data (6474 participants). The participants' weighted mean age was 42·0 years and 12 406 (71%) of 17 521 reported were women. There was suggestive evidence that behavioural activation might be beneficial (iMD −1·83 [95% credible interval (CrI) −2·90 to −0·80]) and that relaxation might be harmful (1·20 [95% CrI 0·17 to 2·27]). Baseline severity emerged as the strongest prognosti

Journal article

O'Farrelly C, Barker B, Watt H, Babalis D, Bakermans-Kranenburg M, Byford S, Ganguli P, Grimas E, Iles J, Mattock H, McGinley J, Phillips C, Ryan R, Scott S, Smith J, Stein A, Stevens E, van IJzendoorn M, Warwick J, Ramchandani Pet al., 2021, A video-feedback parenting intervention to prevent enduring behaviour problems in at-risk children aged 12-36 months: the Healthy Start, Happy Start RCT, HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT, Vol: 25, Pages: 1-+, ISSN: 1366-5278

Journal article

Karyotaki E, Efthimiou O, Miguel C, Bermpohl FMG, Furukawa TA, Cuijpers P, Riper H, Patel V, Mira A, Gemmil AW, Yeung AS, Lange A, Williams AD, Mackinnon A, Geraedts A, van Straten A, Meyer B, Björkelund C, Knaevelsrud C, Beevers CG, Botella C, Strunk DR, Mohr DC, Ebert DD, Kessler D, Richards D, Littlewood E, Forsell E, Feng F, Wang F, Andersson G, Hadjistavropoulos H, Christensen H, Ezawa ID, Choi I, Rosso IM, Klein JP, Shumake J, Garcia-Campayo J, Milgrom J, Smith J, Montero-Marin J, Newby JM, Bretón-López J, Schneider J, Vernmark K, Bücker L, Sheeber LB, Warmerdam L, Farrer L, Heinrich M, Huibers MJH, Kivi M, Kraepelien M, Forand NR, Pugh N, Lindefors N, Lintvedt O, Zagorscak P, Carlbring P, Phillips R, Johansson R, Kessler RC, Brabyn S, Perini S, Rauch SL, Gilbody S, Moritz S, Berger T, Pop V, Kaldo V, Spek V, Forsell Yet al., 2021, Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for depression, JAMA Psychiatry, ISSN: 2168-622X

Importance Personalized treatment choices would increase the effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT) for depression to the extent that patients differ in interventions that better suit them.Objective To provide personalized estimates of short-term and long-term relative efficacy of guided and unguided iCBT for depression using patient-level information.Data Sources We searched PubMed, Embase, PsycInfo, and Cochrane Library to identify randomized clinical trials (RCTs) published up to January 1, 2019.Study Selection Eligible RCTs were those comparing guided or unguided iCBT against each other or against any control intervention in individuals with depression. Available individual patient data (IPD) was collected from all eligible studies. Depression symptom severity was assessed after treatment, 6 months, and 12 months after randomization.Data Extraction and Synthesis We conducted a systematic review and IPD network meta-analysis and estimated relative treatment effect sizes across different patient characteristics through IPD network meta-regression.Main Outcomes and Measures Patient Health Questionnaire–9 (PHQ-9) scores.Results Of 42 eligible RCTs, 39 studies comprising 9751 participants with depression contributed IPD to the IPD network meta-analysis, of which 8107 IPD were synthesized. Overall, both guided and unguided iCBT were associated with more effectiveness as measured by PHQ-9 scores than control treatments over the short term and the long term. Guided iCBT was associated with more effectiveness than unguided iCBT (mean difference [MD] in posttreatment PHQ-9 scores, −0.8; 95% CI, −1.4 to −0.2), but we found no evidence of a difference at 6 or 12 months following randomization. Baseline depression was found to be the most important modifier of the relative association for efficacy of guided vs unguided iCBT. Differences between unguided and guided iCBT in people with baseline symptoms of subthreshol

Journal article

O'Farrelly C, Watt H, Babalis D, Bakermans-Kranenburg M, Barker B, Byford S, Ganguli P, Grimas E, Iles J, Mattock H, McGinley J, Phillips C, Ryan R, Scott S, Smith J, Stein A, Stevens E, van IJzendoorn M, Warwick J, Ramchandani Pet al., 2020, A brief home-based parenting intervention (VIPP-SD) to reduce behaviour problems in young children: A pragmatic randomised clinical trial., JAMA Pediatrics, ISSN: 1072-4710

Journal article

Shafran R, Bennett S, Coughtrey A, Welch A, Walji F, Cross JH, Heyman I, Sibelli A, Smith J, Ross J, Dalrymple E, Varadkar S, Moss-Morris Ret al., 2020, Optimising Evidence-Based Psychological Treatment for the Mental Health Needs of Children with Epilepsy: Principles and Methods, Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, Vol: 23, Pages: 284-295, ISSN: 1096-4037

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:p>There are potent evidence-based psychological treatments for youth with mental health needs, yet they are rarely implemented in clinical practice, especially for youth with mental health disorders in the context of chronic physical illness such as epilepsy. Implementation science, the study of the translation of research into practice, can promote the uptake of existing effective interventions in routine clinical practice and aid the sustainable integration of psychological treatments with routine health care. The aim of this report was to use four implementation science methods to develop a version of an existing effective psychological treatment for mental health disorders [the Modular Approach to Treatment of Children with Anxiety, Depression or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC)] for use within paediatric epilepsy services: (a) literature search; (b) iterative focus groups underpinned by normalisation process theory; (c) Plan–Do–Study–Act methods; and (d) qualitative patient interviews. Findings: Three modifications were deemed necessary to facilitate implementation in children with both mental health disorders and epilepsy. These were (a) a universal brief psychoeducational component addressing the relationship between epilepsy and mental health; (b) supplementary, conditionally activated interventions addressing stigma, parental mental health and the transition to adulthood; and (c) additional training and supervision. The intervention needed relatively little alteration for implementation in paediatric epilepsy services. The modified treatment reflected the scientific literature and the views of clinicians and service users. The multi-method approach used in this report can serve as a model for implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments for children with mental health needs in the context of other chronic illnesses.</jats:p>

Journal article

Kladnitski N, Smith J, Uppal S, James MA, Allen AR, Andrews G, Newby JMet al., 2020, Transdiagnostic internet-delivered CBT and mindfulness-based treatment for depression and anxiety: A randomised controlled trial, Internet Interventions, Vol: 20, Pages: 100310-100310, ISSN: 2214-7829

Journal article

Murphy MJ, Newby JM, Butow P, Loughnan SA, Joubert AE, Kirsten L, Allison K, Shaw J, Shepherd HL, Smith J, Andrews Get al., 2020, Randomised controlled trial of internet‐delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for clinical depression and/or anxiety in cancer survivors (<i>iCanADAPT Early</i>), Psycho-Oncology, Vol: 29, Pages: 76-85, ISSN: 1057-9249

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Purpose</jats:title><jats:p>To evaluate internet‐delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) on clinical depression and/or anxiety, distress, fear of cancer recurrence, and quality of life in cancer survivors.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Random assignation of 114 participants to iCBT or treatment‐as‐usual (TAU). The clinician‐supervised iCBT program (<jats:italic>iCanADAPT Early</jats:italic>) consisted of eight lessons over 16 weeks. Self‐report questionnaires occurred at baseline, midpoint, and posttreatment for both groups with 3‐month follow‐up for iCBT participants. A mixed modelling approach to compare groups occurred.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>iCBT was superior to TAU on all outcome measures at posttreatment. Compared with TAU, the iCBT group showed a significant decrease over time in anxiety and depression symptoms (primary outcome, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, <jats:italic>Hedges g =</jats:italic> 1.51). Additionally the iCBT group had significantly lower general distress (Kessler‐10, <jats:italic>g =</jats:italic> 1.56), fear of cancer recurrence (Fear of Cancer Recurrence Inventory, <jats:italic>g =</jats:italic> 0.39), and significantly higher quality of life (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy—General, <jats:italic>g = 0.74</jats:italic>) at posttreatment compared with the TAU group. High adherence and satisfaction were found for iCBT with low clinician time.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusion</jats:title><jats:p>Clinician‐supervised iCBT has significant benefits for cancer survivors with clinical depression and anxiety disorders.</jats:p></jats:sec>

Journal article

Smith J, Faux SG, Gardner T, Hobbs MJ, James MA, Joubert AE, Kladnitski N, Newby JM, Schultz R, Shiner CT, Andrews Get al., 2019, Reboot Online: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing an Online Multidisciplinary Pain Management Program with Usual Care for Chronic Pain, Pain Medicine, Vol: 20, Pages: 2385-2396, ISSN: 1526-2375

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Objective</jats:title><jats:p>Chronic pain is a prevalent and burdensome condition. Reboot Online was developed to address treatment barriers traditionally associated with accessing face-to-face chronic pain management programs. It is a comprehensive multidisciplinary online treatment program, based on an existing and effective face-to-face multidisciplinary pain program (the Reboot program).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Design &amp; Participants</jats:title><jats:p>A CONSORT-compliant randomized controlled trial was conducted, enrolling adults who had experienced pain for three months or longer.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>Participants were randomly allocated to either an eight-lesson multidisciplinary pain management program, Reboot Online (N = 41), or to a usual care (UC) control group (N = 39). Clinical oversight was provided by a multidisciplinary team remotely, including physiotherapists and clinical psychologists. Participants were measured at baseline, post-treatment (week 16), and three-month follow-up (week 28).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Intention-to-treat analyses revealed that Reboot Online was significantly more effective than UC at increasing pain self-efficacy (g = 0.69) at post-treatment, and these gains were maintained at follow-up. Similarly, Reboot Online was significantly more effective than UC on several secondary measures at post-treatment and follow-up, including movement-based fear avoidance and pain-related disability, but it did not significantly reduce pain interference or depression compared with UC. Clinician input was minimal, and adherence to Reboot Online was moderate, with 61% of participants (N&thi

Journal article

Loughnan SA, Sie A, Hobbs MJ, Joubert AE, Smith J, Haskelberg H, Mahoney AEJ, Kladnitski N, Holt CJ, Milgrom J, Austin M-P, Andrews G, Newby JMet al., 2019, A randomized controlled trial of ‘MUMentum Pregnancy’: Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy program for antenatal anxiety and depression, Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol: 243, Pages: 381-390, ISSN: 0165-0327

Journal article

Loughnan SA, Newby JM, Haskelberg H, Mahoney A, Kladnitski N, Smith J, Black E, Holt C, Milgrom J, Austin M-P, Andrews Get al., 2018, Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for perinatal anxiety and depression versus treatment as usual: study protocol for two randomised controlled trials, Trials, Vol: 19

Journal article

Walji F, Welch A, Smith J, Bennett S, Cross H, Henderson C, Heyman I, Moss-Morris R, Ross J, Evans A, Shafran Ret al., 2018, 092 Mental health intervention for children with epilepsy (MICE): intervention development, Great Ormond Street Hospital Conference 2018: Continuous Care, Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd and Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health

Conference paper

Schultz R, Smith J, Newby JM, Gardner T, Shiner CT, Andrews G, Faux SGet al., 2018, Pilot Trial of the Reboot Online Program: An Internet-Delivered, Multidisciplinary Pain Management Program for Chronic Pain, Pain Research and Management, Vol: 2018, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 1203-6765

<jats:p><jats:italic>Objectives</jats:italic>. Chronic pain causes significant disability and psychological distress, but barriers often prevent people with pain from engaging in traditional face-to-face pain management programs. Accessible, feasible, and effective alternative treatment options are needed. <jats:italic>Methods</jats:italic>. A prospective, feasibility pilot study was conducted to trial a novel, multidisciplinary online pain management program: the “Reboot Online” program. Twenty participants experiencing pain of at least three months duration were recruited. All participants were enrolled in the “Reboot Online” program, consisting of eight online lessons completed over 16 weeks. Lessons incorporated multidisciplinary input from medical pain specialists, physiotherapists, and psychologists. Participants were assessed at pretreatment, posttreatment, and follow-up using a suite of outcome measures examining pain, disability, catastrophising, self-efficacy, mood, and psychological distress. <jats:italic>Results</jats:italic>. 13 participants completed the program (65% adherence). Following treatment, the participants had significantly improved scores on measures of pain-related disability, self-efficacy, catastrophising thoughts, acceptance of pain, symptoms of depression, and general psychological distress. These findings were retained at three months posttreatment. Participants also reported high levels of acceptability and satisfaction with the program. <jats:italic>Discussion</jats:italic>. This study provides pilot evidence for the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of an online, multidisciplinary pain program: “Reboot Online.” Future investigations will focus on conducting a randomised controlled trial of this innovative and promising treatment for chronic pain. This trial is registered with <jats:ext-link xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/199

Journal article

Kladnitski N, Smith J, Allen A, Andrews G, Newby JMet al., 2018, Online mindfulness-enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression: Outcomes of a pilot trial, Internet Interventions, Vol: 13, Pages: 41-50, ISSN: 2214-7829

Journal article

Newby JM, Smith J, Uppal S, Mason E, Mahoney AEJ, Andrews Get al., 2018, Internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy versus psychoeducation control for illness anxiety disorder and somatic symptom disorder: A randomized controlled trial., Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Vol: 86, Pages: 89-98, ISSN: 0022-006X

Journal article

O'moore KA, Newby JM, Andrews G, Hunter DJ, Bennell K, Smith J, Williams ADet al., 2018, Internet Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Older Adults With Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Arthritis Care &amp; Research, Vol: 70, Pages: 61-70, ISSN: 2151-464X

<jats:sec><jats:title>Objective</jats:title><jats:p>To determine the efficacy of an internet‐based cognitive–behavioral therapy (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">iCBT</jats:styled-content>) program for depression in older adults with osteoarthritis (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">OA</jats:styled-content>) of the knee and comorbid major depressive disorder (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">MDD</jats:styled-content>).</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>We conducted a randomized controlled trial in 69 adults (ages ≥50 years) meeting criteria for <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">MDD</jats:styled-content> and <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">OA</jats:styled-content> of the knee with 1‐week postintervention (week 11) and 3‐month followup (week 24) end points. Patients were allocated to either a 10‐week <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">iCBT</jats:styled-content> program for depression added to treatment as usual (<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">TAU</jats:styled-content>) or to a <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">TAU</jats:styled-content> control group. Primary outcomes were depression symptoms (9‐Item Patient Health Questionnaire [<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">PHQ</jats:styled-content>‐9]) and psychological distress (Kessler‐10 [K‐10]). Secondary outcomes included arthritis self‐efficacy (Arthritis Self‐Efficacy Scale [<jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">ASES</jats:styled-content>]), <jats:styled-content style="fixed-case">OA</jats:styled-content> pain, stiffness, physical function (Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index [<jats:styled-co

Journal article

Smith J, Newby JM, Burston N, Murphy MJ, Michael S, Mackenzie A, Kiln F, Loughnan SA, O'Moore KA, Allard BJ, Williams AD, Andrews Get al., 2017, Help from home for depression: A randomised controlled trial comparing internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy with bibliotherapy for depression, Internet Interventions, Vol: 9, Pages: 25-37, ISSN: 2214-7829

Journal article

Karageorge A, Murphy MJ, Newby JM, Kirsten L, Andrews G, Allison K, Loughnan S, Price M, Shaw J, Shepherd H, Smith J, Butow Pet al., 2017, Acceptability of an internet cognitive behavioural therapy program for people with early-stage cancer and cancer survivors with depression and/or anxiety: thematic findings from focus groups, Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol: 25, Pages: 2129-2136, ISSN: 0941-4355

Journal article

Newby J, Robins L, Wilhelm K, Smith J, Fletcher T, Gillis I, Ma T, Finch A, Campbell L, Andrews Get al., 2017, Web-Based Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Depression in People With Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol: 19, Pages: e157-e157

Journal article

Newby JM, Mahoney AEJ, Mason EC, Smith J, Uppal S, Andrews Get al., 2016, Pilot trial of a therapist-supported internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy program for health anxiety, Internet Interventions, Vol: 6, Pages: 71-79, ISSN: 2214-7829

Journal article

Allen AR, Newby JM, Mackenzie A, Smith J, Boulton M, Loughnan SA, Andrews Get al., 2016, Internet cognitive–behavioural treatment for panic disorder: randomised controlled trial and evidence of effectiveness in primary care, BJPsych Open, Vol: 2, Pages: 154-162

<jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>Internet cognitive–behavioural therapy (iCBT) for panic disorder of up to 10 lessons is well established. The utility of briefer programmes is unknown.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Aims</jats:title><jats:p>To determine the efficacy and effectiveness of a five-lesson iCBT programme for panic disorder.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Method</jats:title><jats:p>Study 1 (efficacy): Randomised controlled trial comparing active iCBT (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>=27) and waiting list control participants (<jats:italic>n</jats:italic>=36) on measures of panic severity and comorbid symptoms. Study 2 (effectiveness): 330 primary care patients completed the iCBT programme under the supervision of primary care practitioners.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>iCBT was significantly more effective than waiting list control in reducing panic (<jats:italic>g</jats:italic>=0.97, 95% CI 0.34 to 1.61), distress (<jats:italic>g</jats:italic>=0.92, 95% CI 0.28 to 1.55), disability (<jats:italic>g</jats:italic>=0.81, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.44) and depression (<jats:italic>g</jats:italic>=0.79, 95% CI 0.17 to 1.41), and gains were maintained at 3 months post-treatment (iCBT group). iCBT remained effective in primary care, but lower completion rates were found (56.1% in study 2 v. 63% in study 1). Adherence appeared to be related to therapist contact.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Conclusions</jats:title><jats:p>The five-lesson Panic Program has utility for treating panic disorder, which translates to primary care. Adherence may be enhanced with therapist contact.</jats:p></jats:sec>

Journal article

Robins L, Newby J, Wilhelm K, Smith J, Fletcher T, Ma T, Finch A, Campbell L, Andrews Get al., 2015, Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial, BMJ Open Diabetes Research &amp; Care, Vol: 3, Pages: e000144-e000144

Journal article

Williams AD, OMoore K, Blackwell SE, Smith J, Holmes EA, Andrews Get al., 2015, Positive imagery cognitive bias modification (CBM) and internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (iCBT): A randomized controlled trial, Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol: 178, Pages: 131-141, ISSN: 0165-0327

Journal article

Mahoney AEJ, Mackenzie A, Williams AD, Smith J, Andrews Get al., 2014, Internet cognitive behavioural treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder: A randomised controlled trial, Behaviour Research and Therapy, Vol: 63, Pages: 99-106, ISSN: 0005-7967

Journal article

Mewton L, Smith J, Rossouw P, Andrews Get al., 2014, Current perspectives on Internet delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for adults with anxiety and related disorders, Psychology Research and Behavior Management, Pages: 37-37

Journal article

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