Imperial College London

Professor Josip Car

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0799josip.car Website

 
 
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Location

 

326Reynolds BuildingCharing Cross Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

535 results found

Sheng B, Guan Z, Lim L-L, Jiang Z, Mathioudakis N, Li J, Liu R, Bao Y, Bee YM, Wang Y-X, Zheng Y, Tan GSW, Ji H, Car J, Wang H, Klonoff DC, Li H, Tham Y-C, Wong TY, Jia Wet al., 2024, Large language models for diabetes care: Potentials and prospects., Sci Bull (Beijing)

Journal article

Wang X, Sanders HM, Liu Y, Seang K, Tran BX, Atanasov AG, Qiu Y, Tang S, Car J, Wang YX, Wong TY, Tham Y-C, Chung KCet al., 2023, ChatGPT: promise and challenges for deployment in low- and middle-income countries., Lancet Reg Health West Pac, Vol: 41

In low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), the fields of medicine and public health grapple with numerous challenges that continue to hinder patients' access to healthcare services. ChatGPT, a publicly accessible chatbot, has emerged as a potential tool in aiding public health efforts in LMICs. This viewpoint details the potential benefits of employing ChatGPT in LMICs to improve medicine and public health encompassing a broad spectrum of domains ranging from health literacy, screening, triaging, remote healthcare support, mental health support, multilingual capabilities, healthcare communication and documentation, medical training and education, and support for healthcare professionals. Additionally, we also share potential concerns and limitations associated with the use of ChatGPT and provide a balanced discussion on the opportunities and challenges of using ChatGPT in LMICs.

Journal article

Liew H, Pienkowska A, Ang C-S, Mahadzir MDA, Goh KFI, Lodh N, Bojic I, Lawate A, Ong QC, Venkataraman K, Car J, Ho AHYet al., 2023, Empowering Foot Care Literacy Among People Living With Diabetes and Their Carers With an mHealth App: Protocol for a Feasibility Study., JMIR Res Protoc, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1929-0748

BACKGROUND: Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) cause significant morbidity affecting 19% to 34% of people living with diabetes mellitus. DFUs not only impair quality of life but may also result in limb loss and mortality. Patient education has been advocated to raise awareness of proper foot self-care and the necessity of seeking assistance when a foot wound occurs. Modern technologies, including mobile health (mHealth) interventions such as health apps, bring the potential for more cost-effective and scalable interventions. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to examine the feasibility and usability of a newly developed mHealth app called Well Feet, which is a diabetes and foot care education app for individuals at risk of developing DFU. METHODS: Well Feet was developed using an evidence-based and expert panel cocreation approach to deliver educational content available in 3 languages (ie, English, Chinese, and Malay) via animation videos and a range of additional features, including adaptive learning. A nonrandomized, single-arm feasibility study using a mixed methods approach with a series of validated questionnaires and focus group discussions will be conducted. In total, 40 patients and carers will be recruited from a tertiary hospital diabetes clinic to receive a 1-month mHealth intervention. The primary outcomes are the usability of the app and a qualitative perspective on user experience. Secondary outcomes include changes in foot care knowledge, self-management behaviors, and quality of life. RESULTS: Patient recruitment began in July 2023, and the intervention and data collection will be completed by the end of September 2023. This study has been approved by National Healthcare Group Domain Specific Review Board (2022/00614) on February 10, 2023. The expected results will be published in spring 2024. CONCLUSIONS: Through this feasibility study, the Well Feet DFU education app will undergo a comprehensive quantitative and qualitative evaluation of its usability and accept

Journal article

Martinengo L, Lin X, Jabir AI, Kowatsch T, Atun R, Car J, Tudor Car Let al., 2023, Conversational Agents in Health Care: Expert Interviews to Inform the Definition, Classification, and Conceptual Framework., J Med Internet Res, Vol: 25

BACKGROUND: Conversational agents (CAs), or chatbots, are computer programs that simulate conversations with humans. The use of CAs in health care settings is recent and rapidly increasing, which often translates to poor reporting of the CA development and evaluation processes and unreliable research findings. We developed and published a conceptual framework, designing, developing, evaluating, and implementing a smartphone-delivered, rule-based conversational agent (DISCOVER), consisting of 3 iterative stages of CA design, development, and evaluation and implementation, complemented by 2 cross-cutting themes (user-centered design and data privacy and security). OBJECTIVE: This study aims to perform in-depth, semistructured interviews with multidisciplinary experts in health care CAs to share their views on the definition and classification of health care CAs and evaluate and validate the DISCOVER conceptual framework. METHODS: We conducted one-on-one semistructured interviews via Zoom (Zoom Video Communications) with 12 multidisciplinary CA experts using an interview guide based on our framework. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed by the research team, and analyzed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: Following participants' input, we defined CAs as digital interfaces that use natural language to engage in a synchronous dialogue using ≥1 communication modality, such as text, voice, images, or video. CAs were classified by 13 categories: response generation method, input and output modalities, CA purpose, deployment platform, CA development modality, appearance, length of interaction, type of CA-user interaction, dialogue initiation, communication style, CA personality, human support, and type of health care intervention. Experts considered that the conceptual framework could be adapted for artificial intelligence-based CAs. However, despite recent advances in artificial intelligence, including large language models, the technology is not able to ensure

Journal article

Yeung AWK, Torkamani A, Butte AJ, Glicksberg BS, Schuller B, Rodriguez B, Ting DSW, Bates D, Schaden E, Peng H, Willschke H, van der Laak J, Car J, Rahimi K, Celi LA, Banach M, Kletecka-Pulker M, Kimberger O, Eils R, Islam SMS, Wong ST, Wong TY, Gao W, Brunak S, Atanasov AGet al., 2023, The promise of digital healthcare technologies, FRONTIERS IN PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 11

Journal article

Chan DYS, Surendra NK, Ng YZ, Lee S-H, Yong E, Hong Q, Goh CC, Lai TP, Tan AHM, Law CCC, Liang S, Car J, Lo ZJet al., 2023, Prospective study on the clinical and economic burden of venous leg ulcers in the tropics, JOURNAL OF VASCULAR SURGERY-VENOUS AND LYMPHATIC DISORDERS, Vol: 11, Pages: 954-963, ISSN: 2213-333X

Journal article

Shin YH, Hwang J, Kwon R, Lee SW, Kim MS, Shin JI, Yon DKet al., 2023, Global, regional, and national burden of allergic disorders and their risk factors in 204 countries and territories, from 1990 to 2019: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019, ALLERGY, Vol: 78, Pages: 2232-2254, ISSN: 0105-4538

Journal article

Lin X, Martinengo L, Jabir AI, Ho AHY, Car J, Atun R, Car LTet al., 2023, Scope, Characteristics, Behavior Change Techniques, and Quality of Conversational Agents for Mental Health and Well-Being: Systematic Assessment of Apps, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, Vol: 25, ISSN: 1438-8871

Journal article

GBD 2021 Diabetes Collaborators, 2023, Global, regional, and national burden of diabetes from 1990 to 2021, with projections of prevalence to 2050: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2021., The Lancet, Vol: 402, Pages: 203-234, ISSN: 0140-6736

BACKGROUND: Diabetes is one of the leading causes of death and disability worldwide, and affects people regardless of country, age group, or sex. Using the most recent evidentiary and analytical framework from the Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries, and Risk Factors Study (GBD), we produced location-specific, age-specific, and sex-specific estimates of diabetes prevalence and burden from 1990 to 2021, the proportion of type 1 and type 2 diabetes in 2021, the proportion of the type 2 diabetes burden attributable to selected risk factors, and projections of diabetes prevalence through 2050. METHODS: Estimates of diabetes prevalence and burden were computed in 204 countries and territories, across 25 age groups, for males and females separately and combined; these estimates comprised lost years of healthy life, measured in disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs; defined as the sum of years of life lost [YLLs] and years lived with disability [YLDs]). We used the Cause of Death Ensemble model (CODEm) approach to estimate deaths due to diabetes, incorporating 25 666 location-years of data from vital registration and verbal autopsy reports in separate total (including both type 1 and type 2 diabetes) and type-specific models. Other forms of diabetes, including gestational and monogenic diabetes, were not explicitly modelled. Total and type 1 diabetes prevalence was estimated by use of a Bayesian meta-regression modelling tool, DisMod-MR 2.1, to analyse 1527 location-years of data from the scientific literature, survey microdata, and insurance claims; type 2 diabetes estimates were computed by subtracting type 1 diabetes from total estimates. Mortality and prevalence estimates, along with standard life expectancy and disability weights, were used to calculate YLLs, YLDs, and DALYs. When appropriate, we extrapolated estimates to a hypothetical population with a standardised age structure to allow comparison in populations with different age structures. We used the com

Journal article

Lo ZJ, Chong B, Tan E, Ooi D, Liew H, Hoi WH, Cho YT, Wu K, Surendra NK, Mammadova M, Nah A, Goh V, Car Jet al., 2023, Patients, carers and healthcare providers' perspectives on a patient-owned surveillance system for diabetic foot ulcer care: A qualitative study, DIGITAL HEALTH, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2055-2076

Journal article

Castro O, Mair JL, Salamanca-Sanabria A, Alattas A, Keller R, Zheng S, Jabir A, Lin X, Frese BF, Lim CS, Santhanam P, van Dam RM, Car J, Lee J, Tai ES, Fleisch E, von Wangenheim F, Car LT, Mueller-Riemenschneider F, Kowatsch Tet al., 2023, Development of "LvL UP 1.0": a smartphone-based, conversational agent-delivered holistic lifestyle intervention for the prevention of non-communicable diseases and common mental disorders, FRONTIERS IN DIGITAL HEALTH, Vol: 5

Journal article

Lo ZJ, Tan E, Chandrasekar S, Ooi D, Liew H, Ang G, Yong E, Hong Q, Chew T, Farhan MFM, Zhu X, Ang P, Law C, Raman N, Park D, Tavintharan S, Hoi WH, Lin J, Koo HY, Choo J, Low KQ, Low R, Venkataraman K, Car J, Chew DEKet al., 2023, Diabetic foot in primary and tertiary (DEFINITE) Care: A health services innovation in coordination of diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) Care within a healthcare cluster-18-month results from an observational population health cohort study, INTERNATIONAL WOUND JOURNAL, Vol: 20, Pages: 1609-1621, ISSN: 1742-4801

Journal article

Bojic I, Mammadova M, Ang C-S, Teo WL, Diordieva C, Pienkowska A, Gasevic D, Car Jet al., 2023, Empowering Health Care Education Through Learning Analytics: In-depth Scoping Review, JOURNAL OF MEDICAL INTERNET RESEARCH, Vol: 25, ISSN: 1438-8871

Journal article

Tan B, Pereira M, Yang S-Y, Lim C, Tan C, Woon E, Pua Y, Ng J, Lee K, Briggs A, Hunter D, Skou S, Thumboo J, Car Jet al., 2023, COLLABORATIVE MODEL OF CARE BETWEEN ORTHOPAEDICS AND ALLIED HEALTHCARE PROFESSIONALS (CONNACT) FOR KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: 12-MONTHS FOLLOW-UP OF AN EFFECTIVENESS-IMPLEMENTATION HYBRID TRIAL, World Congress of Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI), Publisher: ELSEVIER SCI LTD, Pages: S16-S17, ISSN: 1063-4584

Conference paper

Tan BY, Goh ZZS, Lim CJ, Pereira MJ, Yang S-Y, Tan KG, Tan ACK, Liang P, Abbott JH, Briggs AMM, Hunter DJJ, Skou STT, Thumboo J, Car Jet al., 2023, Singapore KneE osTeoarthritis CoHort (SKETCH): protocol for a multi-centre prospective cohort study, BMC MUSCULOSKELETAL DISORDERS, Vol: 24

Journal article

Teixeira F, Li E, Laranjo L, Collins C, Irving G, Fernandez MJ, Car J, Ungan M, Petek D, Hoffman R, Majeed A, Nessler K, Lingner H, Jimenez G, Darzi A, Jácome C, Neves ALet al., 2023, Digital maturity and its determinants in General Practice: a cross- sectional study in 20 countries, Frontiers in Public Health, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2296-2565

Background: The extent to which digital technologies are employed to promote the delivery of high-quality healthcare is known as Digital Maturity. Individual and systemic digital maturity are both necessary to ensure a successful, scalable and sustainable digital transformation in healthcare. However, digital maturity in primary care has been scarcely evaluated.Objectives: This study assessed the digital maturity in General Practice (GP) globally and evaluated its association with participants' demographic characteristics, practice characteristics and features of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) use.Methods: GPs across 20 countries completed an online questionnaire between June and September 2020. Demographic data, practice characteristics, and features of EHRs use were collected. Digital maturity was evaluated through a framework based on usage, resources and abilities (divided in this study in its collective and individual components), interoperability, general evaluation methods and impact of digital technologies. Each dimension was rated as 1 or 0. The digital maturity score was calculated as the sum of the six dimensions and ranged between 0 to 6 (maximum digital maturity). Multivariable linear regression was used to model the total score, while multivariable logistic regression was used to model the probability of meeting each dimension of the score.Results: One thousand six hundred GPs (61% female, 68% Europeans) participated. GPs had a median digital maturity of 4 (P25–P75: 3–5). Positive associations with digital maturity were found with: male gender [B = 0.18 (95% CI 0.01; 0.36)], use of EHRs for longer periods [B = 0.45 (95% CI 0.35; 0.54)] and higher frequencies of access to EHRs [B = 0.33 (95% CI 0.17; 0.48)]. Practicing in a rural setting was negatively associated with digital maturity [B = −0.25 (95%CI −0.43; −0.08)]. Usage (90%) was the most acknowledged dimension while interoperability (47%) and use of best practice gen

Journal article

Bojic I, Liu J, Ong QC, Lawate A, Palaiyan M, Lwin M, Abisheganaden J, Theng YL, Ho M-HR, Chia MYH, Car Jet al., 2023, Identifying at-risk university students: A system for longitudinal monitoring of sleep health, IEEE International Conference on Digital Health (IEEE ICDH) at the IEEE World Congress on Services (SERVICES), Publisher: IEEE COMPUTER SOC, Pages: 143-149

Conference paper

Lo ZJ, Harish KB, Tan E, Zhu J, Chan S, Liew H, Hoi WH, Liang S, Cho YT, Koo HY, Wu K, Car Jet al., 2023, A feasibility study on the efficacy of a patient-owned wound surveillance system for diabetic foot ulcer care (ePOWS study), DIGITAL HEALTH, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2055-2076

Journal article

Pienkowska A, Ang C-S, Mammadova M, Mahadzir MDA, Car Jet al., 2023, A Diabetes Education App for People Living With Type 2 Diabetes: Co-Design Study, JMIR FORMATIVE RESEARCH, Vol: 7

Journal article

Martinengo L, Lum E, Car J, 2022, Evaluation of chatbot-delivered interventions for self-management of depression: Content analysis, JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, Vol: 319, Pages: 598-607, ISSN: 0165-0327

Journal article

Reiner RC, LBD Triple Burden Collaborators, Hay SI, 2022, The overlapping burden of the three leading causes of disability and death in sub-Saharan African children, Nature Communications, Vol: 13, ISSN: 2041-1723

Despite substantial declines since 2000, lower respiratory infections (LRIs), diarrhoeal diseases, and malaria remain among the leading causes of nonfatal and fatal disease burden for children under 5 years of age (under 5), primarily in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). The spatial burden of each of these diseases has been estimated subnationally across SSA, yet no prior analyses have examined the pattern of their combined burden. Here we synthesise subnational estimates of the burden of LRIs, diarrhoea, and malaria in children under-5 from 2000 to 2017 for 43 sub-Saharan countries. Some units faced a relatively equal burden from each of the three diseases, while others had one or two dominant sources of unit-level burden, with no consistent pattern geographically across the entire subcontinent. Using a subnational counterfactual analysis, we show that nearly 300 million DALYs could have been averted since 2000 by raising all units to their national average. Our findings are directly relevant for decision-makers in determining which and targeting where the most appropriate interventions are for increasing child survival.

Journal article

Fadahunsi KP, Wark PA, Mastellos N, Neves AL, Gallagher J, Majeed A, Webster A, Smith A, Choo-Kang B, Leon C, Edwards C, O'Shea C, Heitz E, Kayode OV, Kowalski M, Jiwani M, OCallaghan ME, Zary N, Henderson N, Chavannes NH, Čivljak R, Olubiyi OA, Mahapatra P, Panday RN, Oriji SO, Fox TE, Faint V, Car Jet al., 2022, Assessment of clinical information quality in digital health technologies: an international eDelphi study, Journal of Medical Internet Research, Vol: 24, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1438-8871

Background:Digital health technologies (DHTs), such as electronic health records and prescribing systems, are transforming health care delivery around the world. The quality of information in DHTs is key to the quality and safety of care. We developed a novel clinical information quality (CLIQ) framework to assess the quality of clinical information in DHTs.Objective:This study explored clinicians’ perspectives on the relevance, definition, and assessment of information quality dimensions in the CLIQ framework.Methods:We used a systematic and iterative eDelphi approach to engage clinicians who had information governance roles or personal interest in information governance; the clinicians were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling techniques. Data were collected using semistructured online questionnaires until consensus was reached on the information quality dimensions in the CLIQ framework. Responses on the relevance of the dimensions were summarized to inform decisions on retention of the dimensions according to prespecified rules. Thematic analysis of the free-text responses was used to revise definitions and the assessment of dimensions.Results:Thirty-five clinicians from 10 countries participated in the study, which was concluded after the second round. Consensus was reached on all dimensions and categories in the CLIQ framework: informativeness (accuracy, completeness, interpretability, plausibility, provenance, and relevance), availability (accessibility, portability, security, and timeliness), and usability (conformance, consistency, and maintainability). A new dimension, searchability, was introduced in the availability category to account for the ease of finding needed information in the DHTs. Certain dimensions were renamed, and some definitions were rephrased to improve clarity.Conclusions:The CLIQ framework reached a high expert consensus and clarity of language relating to the information quality dimensions. The framework can be used b

Journal article

Amornsriwatanakul A, Rahman HA, Wattanapisit A, Nurmala I, Teresa O de la Cruz MH, Car J, Chia Met al., 2022, University students' overall and domain-specific physical activity during COVID-19: A cross-sectional study in seven ASEAN countries., Heliyon, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2405-8440

This research investigated the overall and domain-specific physical activity (PA) of university students in the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. A cross-sectional study was applied to socioeconomic (SE) and PA online data collected from 15,366 students across 17 universities in seven Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) countries. Statistical analyses using logistic regressions established SE-PA relationships. Over half (60.3%) of ASEAN university students met age-span specific PA guidelines. Students participated in recreational PA the most, followed by study-related activities and 44.1% of students engaged in >8 hrs/day of sedentary time (ST). Compared to students with a normal body mass index (BMI), students who were underweight (UW), overweight (OW), and obese (OB) respectively, had a 14% (UW odds ratio (OR) = 1.14, p = 0.005), 25% (OW OR = 1.25, p < 0.001), and 24% (OB OR = 1.24, p = 0.005) greater probability of meeting PA guidelines. Those who engaged in active transport and belonged to a sports club (SC) had 42% (SC OR = 0.58, p < 0.001, for both) less probability of meeting the PA guidelines, compared with those who travelled inactively and did not belong to a sports club, respectively. Students who participated in 4-6 sport or exercise activities had ten times more likelihood of meeting PA guidelines (OR = 10.15, p < 0.001), compared with those who did not play any sport or do any exercise. Students who spent >8 hrs/day of ST had 32% (ST OR = 0.68, p < 0.001) less probability of meeting PA guidelines, compared with those who spent <3 hrs of ST. These data showed that over half of ASEAN university students achieved PA guidelines and were highly sedentary during the COVID-19 pandemic. Recreational and study-related activities were important for students to maintain sufficient PA and should be actively promoted within the restrictions imposed during periods of the COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns.

Journal article

Wattanapisit A, Abdul Rahman H, Car J, Abdul-Mumin KH, de la Cruz MHTO, Chia M, Rosenberg M, Ho M-HR, Chaiyasong S, Mahmudiono T, Rodjarkpai Y, Dinov ID, Ottom M, Amornsriwatanakul Aet al., 2022, The clusters of health-risk behaviours and mental wellbeing and their sociodemographic correlates: a study of 15,366 ASEAN university students, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 22

Journal article

Lee KFA, Lee EH, Roberts AC, Car J, Soh CK, Christopoulos Get al., 2022, Effects of fun-seeking and external locus of control on smoking behaviour: a cross-sectional analysis on a cohort of working men in Singapore, BMJ OPEN, Vol: 12, ISSN: 2044-6055

Journal article

Frostad JJ, Nguyen QP, Baumann MM, Blacker BF, Marczak LB, Deshpande A, Wiens KE, LeGrand KE, Johnson KB, Abbasi-Kangevari M, Abdoli A, Abolhassani H, Abreu LG, Abrigo MRM, Abu-Rmeileh NME, Adekanmbi V, Agrawal A, Ahmed MB, Al-Aly Z, Alanezi FM, Alcalde-Rabanal JE, Alipour V, Altirkawi KA, Alvis-Guzman N, Alvis-Zakzuk NJ, Amegah AK, Amini S, Amiri F, Amugsi DA, Ancuceanu R, Andrei CL, Andrei T, Antriyandarti E, Anvari D, Arabloo J, Arab-Zozani M, Athari SS, Ausloos M, Ayano G, Aynalem YA, Azari S, Badiye AD, Baig AA, Balakrishnan K, Banach M, Basu S, Bedi N, Bell ML, Bennett DA, Bhattacharyya K, Bhutta ZA, Bibi S, Bohlouli S, Boufous S, Bragazzi NL, Braithwaite D, Burugina Nagaraja S, Butt ZA, Caetano dos Santos FL, Car J, Cárdenas R, Carvalho F, Castaldelli-Maia JM, Castañeda-Orjuela CA, Cerin E, Chattu SK, Chattu VK, Chaturvedi P, Chaturvedi S, Chen S, Chu D-T, Chung S-C, Dahlawi SMA, Damiani G, Dandona L, Dandona R, Darwesh AM, Das JK, Dash AP, Dávila-Cervantes CA, De Leo D, De Neve J-W, Demissie GD, Denova-Gutiérrez E, Dey S, Dharmaratne SD, Dhimal M, Dhungana GP, Diaz D, Dipeolu IO, Dorostkar F, Doshmangir L, Duraes AR, Edinur HA, Efendi F, El Tantawi M, Eskandarieh S, Fadhil I, Fattahi N, Fauk NK, Fereshtehnejad S-M, Folayan MO, Foroutan M, Fukumoto T, Gaidhane AM, Ghafourifard M, Ghashghaee A, Gilani SA, Gill TK, Goulart AC, Goulart BNG, Grada A, Gubari MIM, Guido D, Guo Y, Gupta RD, Gupta R, Gutiérrez RA, Hafezi-Nejad N, Hamadeh RR, Hasaballah AI, Hassanipour S, Hayat K, Heibati B, Heidari-Soureshjani R, Henry NJ, Herteliu C, Hosseinzadeh M, Hsairi M, Hu G, Ibitoye SE, Ilesanmi OS, Ilic IM, Ilic MD, Irvani SSN, Islam SMS, Iwu CCD, Jaafari J, Jakovljevic M, Javaheri T, Jha RP, Ji JS, Jonas JB, Kabir A, Kabir Z, Kalhor R, Kamyari N, Kanchan T, Kapil U, Kapoor N, Kayode GA, Keiyoro PN, Khader YS, Khalid N, Khan EA, Khan M, Khan MN, Khatab K, Khater MM, Khatib MN, Khayamzadeh M, Khubchandani J, Kim GR, Kim YJ, Kimokoti RW, Kisa A, Kisa S, Knibbs LD, Koul PA, Koyet al., 2022, Mapping development and health effects of cooking with solid fuels in low-income and middle-income countries, 2000–18: a geospatial modelling study, The Lancet Global Health, Vol: 10, Pages: e1395-e1411, ISSN: 2214-109X

BackgroundMore than 3 billion people do not have access to clean energy and primarily use solid fuels to cook. Use of solid fuels generates household air pollution, which was associated with more than 2 million deaths in 2019. Although local patterns in cooking vary systematically, subnational trends in use of solid fuels have yet to be comprehensively analysed. We estimated the prevalence of solid-fuel use with high spatial resolution to explore subnational inequalities, assess local progress, and assess the effects on health in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) without universal access to clean fuels.MethodsWe did a geospatial modelling study to map the prevalence of solid-fuel use for cooking at a 5 km × 5 km resolution in 98 LMICs based on 2·1 million household observations of the primary cooking fuel used from 663 population-based household surveys over the years 2000 to 2018. We use observed temporal patterns to forecast household air pollution in 2030 and to assess the probability of attaining the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) target indicator for clean cooking. We aligned our estimates of household air pollution to geospatial estimates of ambient air pollution to establish the risk transition occurring in LMICs. Finally, we quantified the effect of residual primary solid-fuel use for cooking on child health by doing a counterfactual risk assessment to estimate the proportion of deaths from lower respiratory tract infections in children younger than 5 years that could be associated with household air pollution.FindingsAlthough primary reliance on solid-fuel use for cooking has declined globally, it remains widespread. 593 million people live in districts where the prevalence of solid-fuel use for cooking exceeds 95%. 66% of people in LMICs live in districts that are not on track to meet the SDG target for universal access to clean energy by 2030. Household air pollution continues to be a major contributor to particulate exposure

Journal article

Osman T, Lew E, Sng BL, Car Jet al., 2022, Assessment of inter-rater agreement of the American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification system in a women's tertiary hospital <i>An observational study</i>, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF ANAESTHESIOLOGY, Vol: 39, Pages: 787-788, ISSN: 0265-0215

Journal article

Lall P, Kang N, Tan WS, Dutta O, Patinadan PV, Low CK, Car J, Ho AHYet al., 2022, Competing expectations: Advance care planning from the perspectives of doctors and nurses in the South-East Asian context, DEATH STUDIES, Vol: 46, Pages: 1716-1727, ISSN: 0748-1187

Journal article

Zhu X, Olsson MM, Bajpai R, Jarbrink K, Tang WE, Car Jet al., 2022, Health-related quality of life and chronic wound characteristics among patients with chronic wounds treated in primary care: A cross-sectional study in Singapore, INTERNATIONAL WOUND JOURNAL, Vol: 19, Pages: 1121-1132, ISSN: 1742-4801

Journal article

Rahman HA, Amornsriwatanakul A, Abdul-Mumin KH, Agustiningsih D, Chaiyasong S, Chia M, Chupradit S, Le QH, Ivanovitch K, Nurmala I, Majid HBA, Nazan AINM, Rodjarkpai Y, de la Cruz MHTO, Mahmudiono T, Sriboonma K, Sudnongbua S, Vidiawati D, Wattanapisit A, Charoenwattana S, Cahyani N, Car J, Ho M-HR, Rosenberg Met al., 2022, Prevalence of Health-Risk Behaviors and Mental Well-Being of ASEAN University Students in COVID-19 Pandemic, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 19

Journal article

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