Imperial College London

DrKirstenBarnicot

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
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k.barnicot

 
 
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3/8Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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32 results found

Barnicot K, Allen K, Hood C, Crawford Met al., 2020, Older adult experience of care and staffing on hospital and community wards: a cross-sectional study, BMC Health Services Research, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1472-6963

BackgroundRecent major concerns about the quality of healthcare delivered to older adults have been linked to inadequate staffing and a lack of patient-centred care. Patient experience is a key component of quality care - yet there has been little research on whether and how staffing levels and staffing types affect satisfaction amongst older adult hospital inpatients. This study aimed to evaluate the association between registered nurse and healthcare assistant staffing levels and satisfaction with care amongst older adult hospital inpatients, and to test whether any positive effect of higher staffing levels is mediated by staff feeling they have more time to care for patients.MethodsSurvey data from 4928 inpatients aged 65 years and older and 2237 medical and nursing staff from 123 acute and community medical wards in England, United Kingdom (UK) was collected through the Royal College of Psychiatrist’s Elder Care Quality Mark. The cross-sectional association between staffing ratios and older adult patient satisfaction, and mediation by staff perceived time to care, was evaluated using multi-level modelling, adjusted for ward type and with a random effect for ward identity.ResultsHigher numbers of patients per healthcare assistant were associated with poorer patient satisfaction (adjusted β = − 0.32, 95% CI − 0.55 to 0.10, p < 0.01), and this was found to be partially mediated by all ward staff reporting less time to care for patients (adjusted β = − 0.10, bias-corrected 95% CI − 1.16 to − 0.02). By contrast, in both unadjusted and adjusted models, the number of patients per registered nurse was not associated with patient satisfaction.ConclusionsOlder adult hospital patients may particularly value the type of care provided by healthcare assistants, such as basic personal care and supportive communication. Additionally, higher availa

Journal article

Katsakou C, Pistrang N, Barnicot K, White H, Priebe Set al., 2019, Processes of recovery through routine or specialist treatment for borderline personality disorder (BPD): a qualitative study, JOURNAL OF MENTAL HEALTH, Vol: 28, Pages: 604-612, ISSN: 0963-8237

Journal article

Lei H, Barnicot K, Maynard E, Etherington A, Zalewska K, Quirk A, Sanatinia R, Cooper SJ, Crawford MJet al., 2019, Factors influencing use of community treatment orders and quality of care that people receive: results of a national survey in England and Wales, BJPsych Bulletin, Vol: 43, Pages: 227-235, ISSN: 2056-4694

Aims and method: We conducted a secondary analysis of data from the National Audit of Psychosis to identify factors associated with use of community treatment orders (CTOs) and assess the quality of care that people on CTOs receive.Results: Between 1.1 and 20.2% of patients in each trust were being treated on a CTO. Male gender, younger age, greater use of in-patient services, coexisting substance misuse and problems with cognition predicted use of CTOs. Patients on CTOs were more likely to be screened for physical health, have a current care plan, be given contact details for crisis support, and be offered cognitive-behavioural therapy.Clinical implications: CTOs appear to be used as a framework for delivering higher-quality care to people with more complex needs. High levels of variation in the use of CTOs indicate a need for better evidence about the effects of this approach to patient care.Declaration of interest: None.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Crawford M, 2019, Dialectical behaviour therapy v. mentalisation-based therapy for borderline personality disorder, Psychological Medicine, Vol: 49, Pages: 2060-2068, ISSN: 0033-2917

BACKGROUND: Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) and mentalisation-based therapy (MBT) are both widely used evidence-based treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD), yet a head-to-head comparison of outcomes has never been conducted. The present study therefore aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of DBT v. MBT in patients with BPD. METHODS: A non-randomised comparison of clinical outcomes in N = 90 patients with BPD receiving either DBT or MBT over a 12-month period. RESULTS: After adjusting for potentially confounding differences between participants, participants receiving DBT reported a significantly steeper decline over time in incidents of self-harm (adjusted IRR = 0.93, 95% CI 0.87-0.99, p = 0.02) and in emotional dysregulation (adjusted β = -1.94, 95% CI -3.37 to -0.51, p < 0.01) than participants receiving MBT. Differences in treatment dropout and use of crisis services were no longer significant after adjusting for confounding, and there were no significant differences in BPD symptoms or interpersonal problems. CONCLUSIONS: Within this sample of people using specialist personality disorder treatment services, reductions in self-harm and improvements in emotional regulation at 12 months were greater amongst those receiving DBT than amongst those receiving MBT. Experimental studies assessing outcomes beyond 12 months are needed to examine whether these findings represent differences in the clinical effectiveness of these therapies.

Journal article

Hall K, Barnicot K, Crawford M, Moran Pet al., 2019, A systematic review of interventions aimed at improving the cardiovascular health of people diagnosed with personality disorders, Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, Vol: 54, Pages: 897-904, ISSN: 0933-7954

PURPOSE: People with personality disorders have significantly reduced life expectancy and increased rates of cardiovascular disease compared to members of the general population. Given that more people die annually of cardiovascular disease across the globe than from any other cause, it is important to identify the evidence for interventions aimed at improving cardiovascular health among people with personality disorders. METHODS: Systematic literature review. PsycINFO, MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched using NICE Healthcare Databases, as well as CENTRAL and trial registries. We sought to identify randomised controlled trials of interventions pertaining to adults with a primary diagnosis of personality disorder, where the primary outcome measure was cardiovascular health before and after the intervention. RESULTS: A total of 1740 records were identified and screened by two independent reviewers. No papers meeting the inclusion criteria were identified. CONCLUSIONS: This systematic review did not identify any randomised controlled trials testing interventions aimed at improving the cardiovascular health of people with personality disorders. Research in this area could have important public health implications, spanning the fields of psychiatry and general medicine.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Crawford M, 2018, Posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with borderline personality disorder: Treatment outcomes and mediators, Journal of Traumatic Stress, Vol: 31, Pages: 899-908, ISSN: 0894-9867

Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly comorbid with personality disorder (PD). We evaluated whether comorbid PTSD has a negative effect on patients’ ability to benefit from evidence‐based psychological treatments for PD and tested potential mediators of any effect. The effect of PTSD on self‐harm and borderline PD symptoms was evaluated in 90 patients with borderline PD who were receiving dialectical behavior therapy or mentalization‐based therapy. Self‐report and interview measures were administered every 3 months over a 12‐month period. Three‐quarters of participants met criteria for PTSD. In the 12 months after beginning treatment, participants with PTSD did not engage in self‐harm more often or present with more severe borderline PD symptoms. However, a higher level of PTSD symptom severity at baseline was associated with more frequent self‐harm during follow‐up, incidence rate ratio = 1.03, 95% CI [1.01, 1.06], p = .005. Participants whose PTSD did not improve or worsened were more likely to still self‐harm, odds ratio (OR) = 0.91, 95 % CI [0.85, 0.97], p = .004, and report more severe borderline PD symptoms, b = 0.53, 95% CI [0.34, 0.73], p < .001, at the end of 12 months. The negative effects of PTSD symptoms remained significant after adjusting for potential confounders and were partially mediated by high ongoing levels of emotional dysregulation, indirect effect b = 0.32, 95% CI [0.19, 0.50]. These findings identify subgroups at risk of poorer outcomes from evidence‐based psychological treatments for PD and support the idea that treating PTSD may improve outcomes.

Journal article

Yiend J, Barnicot K, Williams M, Fox Eet al., 2018, The influence of positive and negative affect on emotional attention, Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, Vol: 61, Pages: 80-86, ISSN: 0005-7916

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Mechanisms of engagement and disengagement of attention to emotional information are thought to contribute to the onset and maintenance of anxiety and depression, a conclusion based largely on findings in analogue subclinical samples. However, we argue that traditionally defined analogue samples can be misleading. Firstly, research has challenged the adequacy of conventional measures of subclinical traits by illustrating that supposedly distinct scales are highly inter-correlated and do not therefore measure independent constructs. Secondly, recent research in clinical groups has revealed results opposite to those expected from the analogue literature, suggesting speeded, rather than impaired, disengagement from threat. METHODS: We present analogue findings, from a sample of 70 healthy participants, allowing a purer distinction between the phenomenology of anxiety versus depression using the orthogonal traits of positive and negative affect to classify individuals. RESULTS: Using emotional peripheral cueing we found that, at short cue durations, dysphoric individuals' (those with low positive and high negative affect) attention to facial expressions was slowed by emotional compared to neutral invalid cues. LIMITATIONS: Limitations included a small sample size and limited generalisability due to sampling from a student population. CONCLUSIONS: The data suggest that, in line with the previous subclinical literature, dysphoric individuals are slow to disengage attention from emotional information at early stages of processing and are consistent with the possibility that patterns of orienting of attention might be qualitatively different in subclinical versus clinical populations.

Journal article

Insua-Summerhays B, Hart A, Plummer E, Priebe S, Barnicot Ket al., 2018, Staff and patient perspectives on therapeutic engagement during one-to-one observation, Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, Vol: 25, Pages: 546-557, ISSN: 1351-0126

IntroductionPolicies increasingly focus on staff‐patient interactions during one‐to‐one psychiatric nursing observations as an opportunity for therapeutic engagement – yet if and how this is feasible is unknown.AimThis study aimed to integrate staff and patient perspectives to determine what factors facilitate or impede therapeutic engagement during one‐to‐one observation.MethodThematic analysis of qualitative interviews with 31 psychiatric inpatient staff at different levels of seniority and 28 inpatients spanning a range of diagnoses and risk profiles.ResultsNegative experiences of observation were characterized by a reciprocal dynamic where both patients and staff withdrew from interactions, having felt the other did not want to engage with them. Staff and patients agreed that these difficulties could be overcome when staff showed patients that they cared, gradually building trust through simple demonstrations of compassion and ‘normalizing’ conversation about everyday things. This approach helped patients to feel safe enough to open up about their distress, which in turn helped staff to better understand their experiences and work with them to find solutions.Implications for practiceEngagement during observation could be facilitated if staff receive more supervision in understanding difficult dynamics that impede rapport‐building and in managing their emotions towards patients they experience as “hard‐to‐engage”.

Journal article

Collins A, Barnicot K, Sen P, 2018, A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Personality Disorder Prevalence and Patient Outcomes in Emergency Departments., J Pers Disord, Pages: 1-24

The objectives of this study were to perform a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies reporting prevalence of personality disorders (PDs) in emergency departments (EDs) and evaluate the effect of comorbid PDs on clinical outcomes. A systematic search of five databases along with manual searching and expert consultation was performed. A quality appraisal was conducted. A total of 29 articles were included. Prevalence of PDs in ED attendees varied depending on presenting complaint, Q(4) = 577.5, p < .01, with meta-analytic prevalence rates of suicide and self-harm at 35% and 22%, respectively. The assessment method had a significant effect on prevalence rates, Q(3) = 17.36, p < .01. Comorbid PD was a risk factor for repeating presenting complaint, subsequent ED return, and hospitalization. Better identification of PDs using screening tools in EDs could improve patient management and clinical outcomes. Future research should focus on PD prevalence in unselected ED populations using validated diagnostic interviews.

Journal article

Sharp M, Gulati A, Barker C, Barnicot Ket al., 2018, Developing an emotional coping skills workbook for inpatient psychiatric settings: a focus group investigation, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 18, ISSN: 1471-244X

BackgroundEvidence suggests an unmet need for provision of psychological interventions in inpatient psychiatric settings. However, inpatient wards can present a challenging environment in which to implement interventions. The authors developed the Emotional Coping Skills workbook, a psychosocial intervention designed to overcome these challenges and provide inpatients with an opportunity for psychologically-informed therapeutic engagement. The workbook includes information and exercises to empower inpatients to understand their emotions and learn to cope with their distress.MethodsA qualitative study using thematic analysis was undertaken in two UK inpatient psychiatric hospitals to explore staff’s views about whether and how the workbook could be implemented, and on barriers to its use. Thirty-five nursing and occupational therapy staff members participated in four focus groups, and a further two psychologists in semi-structured interviews.ResultsStaff identified key barriers to successful implementation of the workbook. These were firstly, the difficulty in finding time and space for therapeutic work in the stressful ward environment. Secondly, staff identified a culture of emotional neglect whereby neither staff nor inpatients felt able to talk about emotions, and patients’ physical needs and medication were prioritised. Thirdly, staff discussed how psychotic symptoms and emotional distress could limit patients’ ability to engage with the workbook material. Staff suggested ways in which the feasibility of using the workbook could be enhanced. Firstly, they discussed the importance of encouraging staff to value psychological approaches and to view the workbook as a resource to help them manage their existing tasks. Secondly, they emphasised the value of staff drawing on their expertise to deliver the workbook flexibly in different formats and settings, depending on each patient’s particular presentation. Thirdly, they advocated empowering s

Journal article

Innocent S, Podder P, Ram JR, Barnicot K, Sen Pet al., 2017, Using the SAPAS to identify risk for personality disorders among psychiatric outpatients in India: A feasibility study., Personality and Mental Health, Vol: 12, Pages: 15-24, ISSN: 1932-8621

Personality disorders (PDs) are common among psychiatric outpatients and are associated with increased morbidity and worse treatment outcomes. Epidemiological research conducted among this population in Asian countries is limited, reflecting a significant gap in the current literature. One barrier to this research is the lack of appropriate screening tools. The current research assessed the feasibility of using the SAPAS (Standardized Assessment of Personality-Abbreviated Scale) screening tool to identify individuals at high risk of PD in an Indian psychiatric outpatient population and provides an initial estimate of PD prevalence by using a validated diagnostic interview, the ICD-10 International Personality Disorder Examination. The findings suggest that whilst use of the SAPAS was feasible, acceptable to patients and led to clinically useful findings, when using the recommended cut-off score of 4, the SAPAS largely overdiagnoses the risk for PD in psychiatric outpatients in India (positive predictive value = 26.3%). The estimated prevalence of personality disorder in the sample was 11.1%, based on administering the International Personality Disorder Examination diagnostic interview to high-risk patients scoring 4 and above on the SAPAS, which is higher than previous estimates for this population and still likely to be an underestimation. Future studies should translate the measure into Bengali and evaluate its sensitivity and specificity at different cut-off points in order to optimize its use in Indian populations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal article

Dale O, Sethi F, Stanton C, Evans S, Barnicot K, Sedgwick R, Goldsack S, Doran M, Shoolbred L, Samele C, Urquia N, Haigh R, Moran Pet al., 2017, Personality disorder services in England: findings from a national survey, BJPsych Bulletin, Vol: 41, Pages: 247-253, ISSN: 2056-4694

Journal article

Barnicot K, Insua-Summerhayes B, Plummer E, Hart A, Barker C, Priebe Set al., 2017, Staff and patient experiences of decision-making about continuous observation in psychiatric hospitals, SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY AND PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 52, Pages: 473-483, ISSN: 0933-7954

PurposeContinuous observation of psychiatric inpatients aims to protect those who pose an acute risk of harm to self or others, but involves intrusive privacy restrictions. Initiating, conducting and ending continuous observation requires complex decision-making about keeping patients safe whilst protecting their privacy. There is little published guidance about how to balance privacy and safety concerns, and how staff and patients negotiate this in practice is unknown. To inform best practice, the present study, therefore, aimed to understand how staff and patients experience negotiating the balance between privacy and safety during decision-making about continuous observation.MethodsThematic analysis of qualitative interviews with thirty-one inpatient psychiatric staff and twenty-eight inpatients.ResultsMost patients struggled with the lack of privacy but valued feeling safe during continuous observation. Staff and patients linked good decision-making to using continuous observation for short periods and taking positive risks, understanding and collaborating with the patient, and working together as a supportive staff team. Poor decision-making was linked to insufficient consideration of observation’s iatrogenic potential, insufficient collaboration with patients, and the stressful impact on staff of conducting observations and managing risk.ConclusionsBest practice in decision-making about continuous observation may be facilitated by making decisions in collaboration with patients, and by staff supporting each-other in positive risk-taking. To achieve truly patient-centred decision-making, decisions about observation should not be influenced by staff’s own stress levels. To address the negative impact of staff stress on decision-making, it may be helpful to improve staff training, education and support structures.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Crawford MJ, 2016, Specific Mental Health Disorders: Personality Disorders, International Encyclopedia of Public Health, Pages: 55-59, ISBN: 9780128036785

Personality disorders (PDs) are maladaptive patterns of relating to self and others that have negative consequences for the individual and society at large. While debate continues about the most appropriate system for their classification, poor health and social outcomes experienced by people with these problems highlight their public health importance. Interpersonal problems inherent in PD mean that providing services for people with PD is not straightforward. However, clear links with childhood adversity provide a basis for the development of primary prevention strategies, and an evidence base is beginning to emerge that suggests that many forms of PD are amenable to psychosocial intervention.

Book chapter

Sanatinia R, Cowan V, Barnicot K, Zalewska K, Shiers D, Cooper SJ, Crawford MJet al., 2016, Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care., British Journal of Psychiatry Open, Vol: 2, Pages: 318-322, ISSN: 2056-4724

BackgroundUsers of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact.AimsTo examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care.MethodNational cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended assessments of their physical health.ConclusionsFrequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients.

Journal article

Crawford MJ, Barnicot K, Patterson S, Gold Cet al., 2016, Negative results in phase III trials of complex interventions: cause for concern or just good science?, British Journal of Psychiatry, Vol: 209, Pages: 6-8, ISSN: 1472-1465

Some phase III trials inevitably fail to replicate benefits of interventions seen in earlier smaller-scale studies. But the high failure rate in recent mental health trials is of concern. Proper consideration of trial processes and greater use of adaptive trial designs could ensure better use of available resources.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Gonzalez R, McCabe R, Priebe Set al., 2016, Skills use and common treatment processes in dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder, Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, Vol: 52, Pages: 147-156, ISSN: 0005-7916

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) trains participants to use behavioural skills for managing their emotions. The study aimed to evaluate whether skills use is associated with positive treatment outcomes independently of treatment processes that are common across different therapeutic models. METHOD: Use of the DBT skills and three common treatment processes (therapeutic alliance, treatment credibility and self-efficacy) were assessed every 2 months for a year in 70 individuals with borderline personality disorder receiving DBT. Mixed-multilevel modelling was used to determine the association of these factors with frequency of self-harm and with treatment dropout. RESULTS: Participants who used the skills less often at any timepoint were more likely to drop out of DBT in the subsequent two months, independently of their self-efficacy, therapeutic alliance or perceived treatment credibility. More frequent use of the DBT skills and higher self-efficacy were each independently associated with less frequent concurrent self-harm. Treatment credibility and the alliance were not independently associated with self-harm or treatment dropout. LIMITATIONS: The skills use measure could not be applied to a control group who did not receive DBT. The sample size was insufficient for structural equation modelling. CONCLUSION: Practising the DBT skills and building an increased sense of self-efficacy may be important and partially independent treatment processes in dialectical behaviour therapy. However, the direction of the association between these variables and self-harm requires further evaluation.

Journal article

Gonzalez RA, Kallis C, Ullrich S, Barnicot K, Keers R, Coid JWet al., 2016, Childhood maltreatment and violence: Mediation through psychiatric morbidity, Child Abuse & Neglect, Vol: 52, Pages: 70-84, ISSN: 0145-2134

Childhood maltreatment is associated with multiple adverse outcomes in adulthood including poor mental health and violence. We investigated direct and indirect pathways from childhood maltreatment to adult violence perpetration and the explanatory role of psychiatric morbidity. Analyses were based on a population survey of 2,928 young men 21–34 years in Great Britain in 2011, with boost surveys of black and minority ethnic groups and lower social grades. Respondents completed questionnaires measuring psychiatric diagnoses using standardized screening instruments, including antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), drug and alcohol dependence and psychosis. Maltreatment exposures included childhood physical abuse, neglect, witnessing domestic violence and being bullied. Adult violence outcomes included: any violence, violence toward strangers and intimate partners (IPV), victim injury and minor violence. Witnessing domestic violence showed the strongest risk for adult violence (AOR 2.70, 95% CI 2.00, 3.65) through a direct pathway, with psychotic symptoms and ASPD as partial mediators. Childhood physical abuse was associated with IPV (AOR 2.33, 95% CI 1.25, 4.35), mediated by ASPD and alcohol dependence. Neglect was associated with violence toward strangers (AOR 1.73, 95% CI 1.03, 2.91), mediated by ASPD. Prevention of violence in adulthood following childhood physical abuse and neglect requires treatment interventions for associated alcohol dependence, psychosis, and ASPD. However, witnessing family violence in childhood had strongest and direct effects on the pathway to adult violence, with important implications for primary prevention. In this context, prevention strategies should prioritize and focus on early childhood exposure to violence in the family home.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Ramchandani P, 2015, What's in a name? Borderline personality disorder in adolescence, European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol: 24, Pages: 1303-1305, ISSN: 1018-8827

Journal article

Barnicot K, Couldrey L, Sandhu S, Priebe Set al., 2015, Overcoming Barriers to Skills Training in Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Interview Study, PLOS One, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1932-6203

Despite evidence suggesting that skills training is an important mechanism of change in dialecticalbehaviour therapy, little research exploring facilitators and barriers to this processhas been conducted. The study aimed to explore clients’ experiences of barriers to dialecticalbehaviour therapy skills training and how they felt they overcame these barriers, and tocompare experiences between treatment completers and dropouts. In-depth qualitativeinterviews were conducted with 40 clients with borderline personality disorder who hadattended a dialectical behaviour therapy programme. A thematic analysis of participants’reported experiences found that key barriers to learning the skills were anxiety during theskills groups and difficulty understanding the material. Key barriers to using the skills wereoverwhelming emotions which left participants feeling unable or unwilling to use them. Keyways in which participants reported overcoming barriers to skills training were by sustainingtheir commitment to attending therapy and practising the skills, personalising the way theyused them, and practising them so often that they became an integral part of their behaviouralrepertoire. Participants also highlighted a number of key ways in which they weresupported with their skills training by other skills group members, the group therapists, theirindividual therapist, friends and family. Treatment dropouts were more likely than completersto describe anxiety during the skills groups as a barrier to learning, and were less likelyto report overcoming barriers to skills training via the key processes outlined above. Thefindings of this qualitative study require replication, but could be used to generate hypothesesfor testing in further research on barriers to skills training, how these relate to dropout,and how they can be overcome. The paper outlines several such suggestions for furtherresearch.

Journal article

Highton-Williamson E, Barnicot K, Kareem T, Priebe Set al., 2015, Offering Financial Incentives to Increase Adherence to Antipsychotic Medication The Clinician Experience, JOURNAL OF CLINICAL PSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY, Vol: 35, Pages: 120-127, ISSN: 0271-0749

Journal article

Barnicot K, Wampold B, Priebe S, 2014, The effect of core clinician interpersonal behaviours on depression, JOURNAL OF AFFECTIVE DISORDERS, Vol: 167, Pages: 112-117, ISSN: 0165-0327

Journal article

Barnicot K, Savill M, Bhatti N, Priebe Set al., 2014, A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy: Effects on Hospitalisation and Post-Treatment Follow-Up, PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PSYCHOSOMATICS, Vol: 83, Pages: 192-193, ISSN: 0033-3190

Journal article

Barnicot K, Priebe S, 2013, Post-traumatic stress disorder and the outcome of dialectical behaviour therapy for borderline personality disorder, PERSONALITY AND MENTAL HEALTH, Vol: 7, Pages: 181-190, ISSN: 1932-8621

Journal article

Gaglia A, Essletzbichler J, Barnicot K, Bhatti N, Priebe Set al., 2013, Dropping out of dialectical behaviour therapy in the NHS: the role of care coordination, The Psychiatrist, Vol: 37, Pages: 267-271, ISSN: 1758-3209

<jats:sec><jats:title>Aims and method</jats:title><jats:p>Dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) is associated with particularly high drop-out rates in the National Health Service (NHS). This paper seeks to investigate the characteristics of patients with borderline personality disorder dropping out from DBT and the role of care coordination in this phenomenon. Data for the 102 patients receiving DBT in east London, 58% of whom had dropped out of treatment prematurely, were analysed.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>In a multivariable analysis, a history of care coordination was the only variable significantly correlated with drop out: 88% of patients with a history of care coordination dropped out prematurely compared with 52% of patients without such history.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Clinical implications</jats:title><jats:p>The experience of comprehensive care within the care programme approach, particularly care coordination at the start of DBT, affects the retention of patients in DBT. Further qualitative research is required to understand how care coordination and DBT drop out are related, which could lead to changes in how the therapy is delivered in the UK and influence decisions regarding the use of care coordination with patients with borderline personality disorder.</jats:p></jats:sec>

Journal article

Yiend J, Barnicot K, Koster E, 2013, Attention and Emotion., Handbook of Cognition and Emotion, Editors: Robinson, Watkins, Harmon-Jones, Publisher: Guilford Press, ISBN: 9781462509997

Comprehensively examining the relationship between cognition and emotion, this authoritative handbook brings together leading investigators from multiple psychological subdisciplines.

Book chapter

Barnicot K, Katsakou C, Bhatti N, Savill M, Fearns N, Priebe Set al., 2012, Factors predicting the outcome of psychotherapy for borderline personality disorder: A systematic review, CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY REVIEW, Vol: 32, Pages: 400-412, ISSN: 0272-7358

Journal article

Katsakou C, Marougka S, Barnicot K, Savill M, White H, Lockwood K, Priebe Set al., 2012, Recovery in borderline personality disorder (BPD): a qualitative study of service users' perspectives, PLOS One, Vol: 7, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Priebe S, Bhatti N, Barnicot K, Bremner S, Gaglia A, Katsakou C, Molosankwe I, McCrone P, Zinkler Met al., 2012, Effectiveness and Cost-Effectiveness of Dialectical Behaviour Therapy for Self-Harming Patients with Personality Disorder: A Pragmatic Randomised Controlled Trial, PSYCHOTHERAPY AND PSYCHOSOMATICS, Vol: 81, Pages: 356-365, ISSN: 0033-3190

Journal article

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