Imperial College London

MissKatherineDavis

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Research Postgraduate
 
 
 
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k.davis18

 
 
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UG16Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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16 results found

Tang R, Bharani T, Ding J, Li K, Wen J, Gopinath SD, Lin T-J, Luo JXJ, Wen Q, Davis K, van Rhijn N, Name withheld, Anderson SM, Patel RJ, Sarnala S, Oda FS, Singh G, Kothapalli NR, Scott N, Powell JR, Kirshner SNet al., 2022, When internships disappoint., Science, Vol: 378, Pages: 22-24, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Davis K, Pickles M, Gregson S, Hargreaves J, Ayles H, Bock P, Pliakas T, Thomas R, Ohrnberger J, Bwalya J, Bell-Mandla N, Shanaube K, Probert W, Hoddinott G, Bond V, Hayes R, Fidler S, Hauck Ket al., 2022, The effect of universal testing and treatment for HIV on health-related quality of life - data from the HPTN 071 (PopART) cluster randomised trial in Zambia and South Africa, AIDS 2022, Publisher: International AIDS Society, ISSN: 1758-2652

Conference paper

Shamsuddin S, Davis K, Moorhouse L, Mandizvida P, Maswera R, Dadirai T, Nyamukapa C, Gregson Set al., 2022, Association between psychological distress and later reports of hypertension amongst adults in East Zimbabwe, 31st European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Protection (ESH 2022), Publisher: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, Pages: e213-e213, ISSN: 0263-6352

Conference paper

Hall E, Davis K, Ohrnberger J, Pickles M, Gregson S, Thomas R, James H, Pliakas T, Justin B, Dunbar R, Shanaube K, Graeme H, Virginia B, Bock P, Ayles H, Stangl A, Donnell D, Hayes R, Fidler S, Hauck Ket al., 2022, Associations between HIV stigma and health-related quality of life among people living with HIV in Zambia and South Africa: Cross-sectional analysis of data from the HPTN071 (PopART) study, AIDS 2022

Conference paper

Chen JS, Huang CY, Lanke S, Fernandopulle MS, Ji Y, Zhi Y, Rodríguez SG, Frommel AY, Lukačišin M, Zhang Y, Zdenek CN, Wu X-Y, Seenuvasaragavan S, Zhuang Y, Bergh C, Coulbois J, Salloum-Asfar S, Cao B, Davis K, Oda F, Konstantinides N, Zhang L, Name withheld, Agarwal D, Rainaldi JN, Kadlec J, Vekeman J, Kanigicherla VA, Oi K, Isaacson KJ, Ganji R, Dawson-Glass Eet al., 2022, Rules all PIs should follow., Science, Vol: 376, Pages: 24-26, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Stapley J, Davis K, Dadirai T, Moorhouse L, Eaton J, Maswera R, Nyamukapa C, Gregson Set al., 2021, Impact of community-level ART coverage on HIV-related stigmatising attitude within a general population cohort in Manicaland, east Zimbabwe; a longitudinal study, 12th Annual International Conference on Stigma

Conference paper

Davis K, Moorhouse L, Maswera R, Mandizvidza P, Dadirai T, Museka T, Nyamukapa C, Smit M, Gregson Set al., 2021, Associations between HIV status and hypertension status in a high HIV prevalence population in Manicaland: a cross-sectional study of adults, 23rd International Workshop on Long-term Complications of HIV and SARS-CoV-2, Publisher: SAGE Publications, ISSN: 1359-6535

Conference paper

Strachan S, Newson L, Nwokolo N, Davis K, Stevenson Jet al., 2021, “We are still here”: co-developing a guide to the menopause for women living with HIV, Dignified Menopause Summit

Conference paper

Davis K, Perez-Guzman P, Hoyer A, Brinks R, Gregg E, Althoff KN, Justice AC, Reiss P, Gregson S, Smit Met al., 2021, Correction to: Association between HIV infection and hypertension: a global systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies., BMC Medicine, Vol: 19, Pages: 228-228, ISSN: 1741-7015

Journal article

Davis K, Muzariri K, Mangenah C, Dadirai T, Mandizvidza P, Maswera R, Nyamukapa C, Hauck K, Gregson S, Pickles Met al., 2021, Modelling the interaction between depression and HIV incidence in Manicaland, East Zimbabwe, Fast Track Cities 2021

Conference paper

Shibemba M, Chibowa T, Gordon C, Davis K, Strachan Set al., 2021, O16.5 Young women rising: connecting young women living with HIV in the UK, STi & HIV 2021 World Congress, Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Pages: A45-A45, ISSN: 1368-4973

Conference paper

Davis K, Perez Guzman P, Hoyer A, Brinks R, Gregg E, Althoff KN, Justice AC, Reiss P, Gregson S, Smit Met al., 2021, Association between HIV infection and hypertension: a global systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies, BMC Medicine, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1741-7015

Background:Improved access to effective antiretroviral therapy has meant that people living with HIV (PLHIV) are surviving to older ages. However, PLHIV may be ageing differently to HIV-negative individuals, with dissimilar burdens of non-communicable diseases, such as hypertension. While some observational studies have reported a higher risk of prevalent hypertension among PLHIV compared to HIV-negative individuals, others have found a reduced burden. To clarify the relationship between HIV and hypertension, we identified observational studies and pooled their results to assess whether there is a difference in hypertension risk by HIV status.Methods:We performed a global systematic review and meta-analysis of published cross-sectional studies that examined hypertension risk by HIV status among adults aged > 15 (PROSPERO: CRD42019151359). We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, Global Health and Cochrane CENTRAL to August 23, 2020, and checked reference lists of included articles. Our main outcome was the risk ratio for prevalent hypertension in PLHIV compared to HIV-negative individuals. Summary estimates were pooled with a random effects model and meta-regression explored whether any difference was associated with study-level factors.Results:Of 21,527 identified studies, 59 were eligible (11,101,581 participants). Crude global hypertension risk was lower among PLHIV than HIV-negative individuals (risk ratio 0.90, 95% CI 0.85–0.96), although heterogeneity between studies was high (I2 = 97%, p < 0.0001). The relationship varied by continent, with risk higher among PLHIV in North America (1.12, 1.02–1.23) and lower among PLHIV in Africa (0.75, 0.68–0.83) and Asia (0.77, 0.63–0.95). Meta-regression revealed strong evidence of a difference in risk ratios when comparing North American and European studies to African ones (North America 1.45, 1.21–1.74; Europe 1.20, 1.03–1.40).Conclusions:Our findings suggest that the r

Journal article

Davis K, Perez Guzman P, Hoyer A, Brinks R, Justice AC, Reiss P, Gregson S, Smit Met al., 2020, Comparing the prevalence of hypertension among HIV-positive and HIV-negative adults: a global systematic review and meta-analysis of cross-sectional studies, Virtual International Workshop on Adverse Drug Reactions and Co-Morbidities in HIV

Conference paper

Davis K, Guzman PP, Gregson S, Smit Met al., 2020, Comparing the prevalence of hypertension by HIV status in sub-Saharan African adults: a systematic review and meta-analyses of cross-sectional studies, HIV Glasgow, Publisher: JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD, Pages: 70-70

Background: Some evidence from high-income countries (HICs) suggests that PLHIV experience a higher hypertension prevalence thanHIV-negative individuals. It is unclear whether this is the case in subSaharan Africa (SSA), where large-scale integration of hypertensionservices into HIV programmes is being considered. We examined thehypothesis that living with HIV is associated with higher hypertensionprevalence among adults in SSA.Materials and methods: A systematic review of MEDLINE, EMBASE,Global Health, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CochraneCentral Register of Controlled Trials and African Journals Online wasperformed, following PRISMA guidelines, to identify cross-sectionalstudies assessing hypertension prevalence in PLHIV and HIV-negativeindividuals >15 years, in SSA. Only studies defining hypertension as“study-ascertained blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg”, or as “studyascertained blood pressure ≥140/90 mmHg and/or history of antihypertensive medication usage”, were included. Risk of bias assessmentsaddressed adequacy of sample sizes, participant selection and HIV andhypertension status measurement. Random effects models were usedto pool odds ratios (ORs) for prevalent hypertension.Results: We identified 1431 unique studies, of which 12 wereselected for quantitative analysis, providing data on 107 425 participants (49.4% to 69.6% female). The 12 studies collected data between2003 and 2015, in South Africa, Tanzania and Uganda. Risk of biaswas low to moderate, with participant selection a key source of bias.Hypertension prevalence ranged from 5.3% to 51.7% among PLHIVand 8.2% to 65.4% in HIV-negative individuals. Overall, hypertensionprevalence was 41% lower among PLHIV than HIV-negative individuals when using the ≥140/90 mmHg definition (n = 5, OR 0.59, 95%CI 0.55 to 0.64) and 34% lower when using the definition thatincluded medication (n = 7, OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.99).Conclusions: Robust studies comparing hypertension

Conference paper

Davis K, Moorhouse L, Maswera R, Nyamukapa C, Smit M, Gregson Set al., 2020, Examining associations between HIV status and high blood pressure (hypertension) in a high HIV prevalence population in Manicaland, east Zimbabwe: a cross-sectional study of adults, HIV Glasgow, Publisher: JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD, Pages: 69-69

Background: Evidence from high‐income countries indicates that PLHIV experience a higher hypertension prevalence than HIV‐negative individuals. However, it is unclear whether this applies in sub‐Saharan Africa, where behaviour and healthcare access differ. It is also unclear whether reported differences in hypertension prevalence result from socio‐demographic differences between PLHIV and HIV‐negative individuals or from HIV infection and treatment. We analysed data from Manicaland, Zimbabwe, to test the hypothesis that PLHIV had a higher hypertension prevalence than HIV‐negative individuals and assess whether controlling for socio‐demographic factors affected this relationship.Materials and methods: A cross‐sectional study, including interviews and HIV testing, was performed at two urban sites, a town and a roadside trading area (07/2018 to 03/2019). All young women (15 to 24 years) and men (15 to 29 years), and a random sample of 2/3 of older adults were eligible. Individuals were considered hypertensive if they reported ever being diagnosed with hypertension by a doctor/nurse. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for prevalent hypertension, controlling for socio‐demographic confounders. Weights were used in all analyses to compensate for unequal selection probabilities.Results: Among 3404 participants (2169 men; 1235 women), the weighted HIV prevalence was 10.8% (95% CI 9.7 to 11.9%). There were more women among PLHIV (PLHIV: 62.5%, 57.2 to 67.8%; HIV‐negative: 53.2%, 52.2% to 54.2%) and PLHIV were older (>45 years: PLHIV: 40%, 31.8% to 48.2%; HIV‐negative: 25.3%, 23.9% to 26.6%). Hypertension prevalence was higher among PLHIV (20.6%, 16.3% to 25.0%) than HIV‐negative individuals (16.4%, 15.1% to 17.6%; OR 1.33, 1.01 to 1.76, p = 0.048). However, hypertension prevalence was higher in older individuals and women, so after adjusting for age and gender the difference in hypertension between PLHIV and HIV‐negative individuals was non‐signific

Conference paper

Davis K, Lewis J, Liva-Pye K, Liebow A, Horner Pet al., 2019, P462 Re-testing for chlamydia in the national chlamydia screening programme in Bristol, England: an analysis of surveillance data, Abstracts for the STI & HIV World Congress (Joint Meeting of the 23rd ISSTDR and 20th IUSTI), July 14–17, 2019, Vancouver, Canada, Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group, Pages: A215-A216, ISSN: 1368-4973

Background England’s National Chlamydia Screening Programme (NCSP) recommends that sexually active people <25 years test for Chlamydia trachomatis annually and on change of sexual partner. Since 2013, NCSP has also recommended re-testing three months after testing positive. We used a detailed dataset to investigate characteristics associated with repeated chlamydia testing.Methods We used surveillance data of community-based chlamydia testing (excluding online testing and specialist sexual health services) among men and women aged 15–24 years in the Bristol area, January 2011-December 2017. Repeat-testing was defined as returning for further testing within the Bristol area, at least 42 days after initially testing. Initial tests <3 months from December 2017 were excluded. We used logistic regression to compare odds of repeat-testing by initial test result, testing service, residence, initial test result and sexual risk behaviour, adjusted for age and whether the 2013 guidance was operating.Results 14.11% (n=76,758) of women and 7.81% (n=28,038) of men repeat-tested within the study period. Of those with a positive result, 31.21% (n=5,104) of women and 14.88% (n=2,386) of men repeat-tested. Repeat-testing was associated with positive initial tests (Females: Adjusted Odds Ratio 1.90, 95% Confidence Interval 1.76–2.05; Males: 1.98, 1.71–2.27), having ≥2 sexual partners in the last year (1.17, 1.11–1.23; 1.15, 1.02–1.31), having a new sexual partner in the last 3 months (1.31, 1.24–1.38; 1.55, 1.36–1.77), living in the city of Bristol (1.68, 1.57–1.80; 1.43, 1.25–1.65) and testing through Contraception and Sexual Health clinics, which can treat uncomplicated infections, rather than other settings (1.34, 1.28–1.41; 1.37, 1.23–1.53).Conclusion It was encouraging that initial positive tests and riskier sexual behaviour, which mean individuals are more likely to be infected, were associated wit

Conference paper

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