Imperial College London

DrKonstantinNikolic

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1594k.nikolic

 
 
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Location

 

Bessemer 420CBessemer BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Perra:2018:10.1109/EMBC.2018.8512759,
author = {Perra, E and Rapeaux, A and Nikolic, K},
doi = {10.1109/EMBC.2018.8512759},
journal = {Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc},
pages = {2214--2217},
title = {The Crucial Role of Nerve Depolarisation in High Frequency Conduction Block in Mammalian Nerves: Simulation Study.},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2018.8512759},
volume = {2018},
year = {2018}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Neurostimulations which use High Frequency Alternating Current (HFAC) block show great promise for neuromodulatory therapies. Treatments have been developed for various health conditions including obesity and obesity related health risks, and now even stomach cancer treatments are being considered. However the mechanism of the block is still not completely clear, as well as how various neural and electrode parameters affect it. In order to study conduction block during HF stimulation in mammalian axons, we describe a detailed computational model and perform comprehensive simulations. We establish relationships between the blocking frequency and amplitude versus fibre diameter and the distance between the electrode and fibre. We found that only a certain level of depolarisation will universally create a block irrespective of the fibre size, and it is in the range 24-30mV depending on the stimulus frequency. Our study crucially improves our knowledge about this important technique which is rapidly emerging as a commercially available therapy.
AU - Perra,E
AU - Rapeaux,A
AU - Nikolic,K
DO - 10.1109/EMBC.2018.8512759
EP - 2217
PY - 2018///
SN - 1557-170X
SP - 2214
TI - The Crucial Role of Nerve Depolarisation in High Frequency Conduction Block in Mammalian Nerves: Simulation Study.
T2 - Conf Proc IEEE Eng Med Biol Soc
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1109/EMBC.2018.8512759
UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30440845
VL - 2018
ER -