Imperial College London

MrsLeilaAbar

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Research Assistant in Nutrition
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2786l.abar

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Abar:2018:10.1007/s00394-017-1557-1,
author = {Abar, L and Vieira, AR and Aune, D and Sobiecki, JG and Vingeliene, S and Polemiti, E and Stevens, C and Greenwood, DC and Chan, DSM and Schlesinger, S and Norat, T},
doi = {10.1007/s00394-017-1557-1},
journal = {European Journal of Nutrition},
pages = {1701--1720},
title = {Height and body fatness and colorectal cancer risk: an update of the WCRF-AICR systematic review of published prospective studies},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1557-1},
volume = {57},
year = {2018}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - PurposeThere is no published dose–response meta-analysis on the association between height and colorectal cancer risk (CRC) by sex and anatomical sub-site. We conducted a meta-analysis of prospective studies on the association between height and CRC risk with subgroup analysis and updated evidence on the association between body fatness and CRC risk.MethodsPubMed and several other databases were searched up to November 2016. A random effects model was used to calculate dose–response summary relative risks (RR’s).Results47 studies were included in the meta-analyses including 50,936 cases among 7,393,510 participants. The findings support the existing evidence regarding a positive association of height, general and abdominal body fatness and CRC risk. The summary RR were 1.04 [95% (CI)1.02–1.05, I² = 91%] per 5 cm increase in height, 1.02 [95% (CI)1.01–1.02, I² = 0%] per 5 kg increase in weight, 1.06 [95% (CI)1.04–1.07, I² = 83%] per 5 kg/m2 increase in BMI, 1.02 [95% (CI)1.02–1.03, I² = 4%] per 10 cm increase in waist circumference, 1.03 [95% (CI)1.01–1.05, I² = 16%] per 0.1 unit increase in waist to hip ratio. The significant association for height and CRC risk was similar in men and women. The significant association for BMI and CRC risk was stronger in men than in women.ConclusionThe positive association between height and risk of CRC suggests that life factors during childhood and early adulthood might play a role in CRC aetiology. Higher general and abdominal body fatness during adulthood are risk factors of CRC and these associations are stronger in men than in women.
AU - Abar,L
AU - Vieira,AR
AU - Aune,D
AU - Sobiecki,JG
AU - Vingeliene,S
AU - Polemiti,E
AU - Stevens,C
AU - Greenwood,DC
AU - Chan,DSM
AU - Schlesinger,S
AU - Norat,T
DO - 10.1007/s00394-017-1557-1
EP - 1720
PY - 2018///
SN - 0044-264X
SP - 1701
TI - Height and body fatness and colorectal cancer risk: an update of the WCRF-AICR systematic review of published prospective studies
T2 - European Journal of Nutrition
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00394-017-1557-1
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/54493
VL - 57
ER -