Imperial College London

DrLongHoang

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Research Associate
 
 
 
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l.hoang

 
 
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421Guy Scadding BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Publications

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32 results found

Halliday A, Jain P, Hoang L, Parker R, Tolosa-Wright M, Masonou T, Green N, Boakye A, Takwoingi Y, Hamilton S, Mandagere V, Fries A, Coin L, Deeks J, White PJ, Levin M, Beverley P, Kon OM, Lalvani Aet al., 2021, New technologies for diagnosing active TB: the VANTDET diagnostic accuracy study

<h4>Background</h4>Tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating disease for which new diagnostic tests are desperately needed.<h4>Objective</h4>To validate promising new technologies [namely whole-blood transcriptomics, proteomics, flow cytometry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR)] and existing signatures for the detection of active TB in samples obtained from individuals with suspected active TB.<h4>Design</h4>Four substudies, each of which used samples from the biobank collected as part of the interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) in the Diagnostic Evaluation of Active TB study, which was a prospective cohort of patients recruited with suspected TB.<h4>Setting</h4>Secondary care.<h4>Participants</h4>Adults aged ≥ 16 years presenting as inpatients or outpatients at 12 NHS hospital trusts in London, Slough, Oxford, Leicester and Birmingham, with suspected active TB.<h4>Interventions</h4>New tests using genome-wide gene expression microarray (transcriptomics), surface-enhanced laser desorption ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry/liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (proteomics), flow cytometry or qRT-PCR.<h4>Main outcome measures</h4>Area under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity were calculated to determine diagnostic accuracy. Positive and negative predictive values were calculated in some cases. A decision tree model was developed to calculate the incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years of changing from current practice to using the novels tests.<h4>Results</h4>The project, and four substudies that assessed the previously published signatures, measured each of the new technologies and performed a health economic analysis in which the best-performing tests were evaluated for cost-effectiveness. The diagnostic accuracy of the transcriptomic tests ranged from an AUC of 0.81 to 0.84 for detecting al

Journal article

Hoang LT, Jain P, Pillay TD, Tolosa-Wright M, Niazi U, Takwoingi Y, Halliday A, Berrocal-Almanza LC, Deeks JJ, Beverley P, Kon OM, Lalvani Aet al., 2021, Transcriptomic signatures for diagnosing tuberculosis in clinical practice: a prospective, multicentre cohort study, LANCET INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 21, Pages: 366-375, ISSN: 1473-3099

Journal article

Hoang LT, Domingo-Sabugo C, Starren ES, Willis-Owen SA, Morris-Rosendah DJ, Nicholson AG, Cookson WOCM, Moffatt MFet al., 2019, Metabolomic, transcriptomic and genetic integrative analysis reveals important roles of adenosine diphosphate in haemostasis and platelet activation in non-small-cell lung cancer, Molecular Oncology, Vol: 13, Pages: 2406-2421, ISSN: 1574-7891

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer‐related deaths in the world. The most prevalent subtype, accounting for 85% of cases, is non‐small‐cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) and lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD) are the most common subtypes. Despite recent advances in treatment, the low 5‐year survival rate of NSCLC patients (approximately 13%) reflects the lack of early diagnostic biomarkers and incomplete understanding of the underlying disease mechanisms. We hypothesized that integration of metabolomic, transcriptomic and genetic profiles of tumours and matched normal tissues could help to identify important factors and potential therapeutic targets that contribute to tumorigenesis. We integrated omics profiles in tumours and matched adjacent normal tissues of patients with LUSC (N = 20) and LUAD (N = 17) using multiple system biology approaches. We confirmed the presence of previously described metabolic pathways in NSCLC, particularly those mediating the Warburg effect. In addition, through our combined omics analyses we found that metabolites and genes that contribute to haemostasis, angiogenesis, platelet activation and cell proliferation were predominant in both subtypes of NSCLC. The important roles of adenosine diphosphate in promoting cancer metastasis through platelet activation and angiogenesis suggest this metabolite could be a potential therapeutic target.

Journal article

Jha A, Dunning J, Tunstall T, Thwaites R, Hoang L, The MOSAIC Investigators, Kon OM, Zambon MC, Hansel TT, Openshaw Pet al., 2019, Patterns of systemic and local inflammation in patients with asthma hospitalised with influenza, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 54, ISSN: 0903-1936

BackgroundPatients with asthma are at risk of hospitalisation with influenza, but the reasons for this predisposition are unknown.Study settingA prospective observational study of adults with PCR-confirmed influenza in 11 UK hospitals, measuring nasal, nasopharyngeal and systemic immune mediators and whole-blood gene expression.ResultsOf 133 admissions, 40 (30%) had previous asthma; these were more often female (70% vs 38.7%, OR 3.69, 95% CI 1.67 to 8.18, P = 0.0012), required less mechanical ventilation (15% vs 37.6%, χ2 6.78, P=0.0338) and had shorter hospital stays (mean 8.3 vs 15.3 d, P=0.0333) than those without. In patients without asthma, severe outcomes were more frequent in those given corticosteroids (OR=2.63, 95% CI=1.02-6.96, P=0.0466) or presenting >4 days after disease onset (OR 5.49, 95% CI 2.28–14.03, P=0.0002). Influenza vaccination in at-risk groups (including asthma) were lower than intended by national policy and the early use of antiviral medications were less than optimal. Mucosal immune responses were equivalent between groups. Those with asthma had higher serum IFN-α but lower serum TNF, IL-5, IL-6, CXCL8, CXCL9, IL-10, IL-17 and CCL2 levels (all P<0.05); both groups had similar serum IL-13, total IgE, periostin and blood eosinophil gene expression levels. Asthma diagnosis was unrelated to viral load, IFN-α, IFN-γ, IL-5 or IL-13 levels.ConclusionsAsthma is common in those hospitalised with influenza, but may not represent classical Type 2-driven disease. Those admitted with influenza tend to be female with mild serum inflammatory responses, increased serum IFN-α levels and good clinical outcomes.

Journal article

Shimizu C, Kim J, Eleftherohorinou H, Wright VJ, Hoang LT, Tremoulet AH, Franco A, Hibberd ML, Takahashi A, Kubo M, Ito K, Tanaka T, Onouchi Y, Coin LJM, Levin M, Burns JC, Shike H, International Kawasaki Disease Genetic Consortiumet al., 2019, HLA-C variants associated with amino acid substitutions in the peptide binding groove influence susceptibility to Kawasaki disease, Human Immunology, Vol: 80, Pages: 731-738, ISSN: 0198-8859

Kawasaki disease (KD) is a pediatric vasculitis caused by an unknown trigger in genetically susceptible children. The incidence varies widely across genetically diverse populations. Several associations with HLA Class I alleles have been reported in single cohort studies. Using a genetic approach, from the nine single nucleotide variants (SNVs) associated with KD susceptibility in children of European descent, we identified SNVs near the HLA-C (rs6906846) and HLA-B genes (rs2254556) whose association was replicated in a Japanese descent cohort (rs6906846 p = 0.01, rs2254556 p = 0.005). The risk allele (A at rs6906846) was also associated with HLA-C*07:02 and HLA-C*04:01 in both US multi-ethnic and Japanese cohorts and HLA-C*12:02 only in the Japanese cohort. The risk A-allele was associated with eight non-conservative amino acid substitutions (amino acid positions); Asp or Ser (9), Arg (14), Ala (49), Ala (73), Ala (90), Arg (97), Phe or Ser (99), and Phe or Ser (116) in the HLA-C peptide binding groove that binds peptides for presentation to cytotoxic T cells (CTL). This raises the possibility of increased affinity to a "KD peptide" that contributes to the vasculitis of KD in genetically susceptible children.

Journal article

Dunning J, Blankley S, Hoang LT, Cox M, Graham CM, James PL, Bloom CI, Chaussabel D, Banchereau J, Brett SJ, MOSAIC Investigators, Moffatt MF, O'Garra A, Openshaw PJMet al., 2019, Author Correction: Progression of whole-blood transcriptional signatures from interferon-induced to neutrophil-associated patterns in severe influenza., Nature Immunology, Vol: 20, Pages: 373-373, ISSN: 1529-2908

In the version of this article initially published, a source of funding was not included in the Acknowledgements section. That section should include the following: P.J.M.O. was supported by EU FP7 PREPARE project 602525. The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF version of the article.

Journal article

Nagelkerke SQ, Tacke CE, Breunis WB, Tanck MWT, Geissler J, Png E, Hoang LT, van der Heijden J, Naim ANM, Yeung RSM, Levin ML, Wright VJ, Burgner DP, Ponsonby A-L, Ellis JA, Cimaz R, Shimizu C, Burns JC, Fijnyandraat K, van der Schoot CE, van den Berg TK, de Boer M, Davila S, Hibberd ML, Kuijpers TW, Dahdah N, Kone-Paut Iet al., 2019, Extensive ethnic variation and linkage disequilibrium at the FCGR2/3 locus: Different genetic associations revealed in Kawasaki Disease, Frontiers in Immunology, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1664-3224

The human Fc-gamma receptors (FcγRs) link adaptive and innate immunity by binding immunoglobulin G (IgG). All human low-affinity FcγRs are encoded by the FCGR2/3 locus containing functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and gene copy number variants. This locus is notoriously difficult to genotype and high-throughput methods commonly used focus on only a few SNPs. We performed multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for all relevant genetic variations at the FCGR2/3 locus in >4,000 individuals to define linkage disequilibrium (LD) and allele frequencies in different populations. Strong LD and extensive ethnic variation in allele frequencies was found across the locus. LD was strongest for the FCGR2C-ORF haplotype (rs759550223+rs76277413), which leads to expression of FcγRIIc. In Europeans, the FCGR2C-ORF haplotype showed strong LD with, among others, rs201218628 (FCGR2A-Q27W, r2 = 0.63). LD between these two variants was weaker (r2 = 0.17) in Africans, whereas the FCGR2C-ORF haplotype was nearly absent in Asians (minor allele frequency <0.005%). The FCGR2C-ORF haplotype and rs1801274 (FCGR2A-H131R) were in weak LD (r2 = 0.08) in Europeans. We evaluated the importance of ethnic variation and LD in Kawasaki Disease (KD), an acute vasculitis in children with increased incidence in Asians. An association of rs1801274 with KD was previously shown in ethnically diverse genome-wide association studies. Now, we show in 1,028 European KD patients that the FCGR2C-ORF haplotype, although nearly absent in Asians, was more strongly associated with susceptibility to KD than rs1801274 in Europeans. Our data illustrate the importance of interpreting findings of association studies concerning the FCGR2/3 locus with knowledge of LD and ethnic variation.

Journal article

Wright V, Herberg J, Kaforou M, Shimizu C, Eleftherohorinou H, Shailes H, Barendregt A, Menikou S, Gormley S, Berk M, Hoang L, Tremoulet A, Kanegaye J, Coin L, Glode M, Hibberd M, Kuijpers T, Hoggart C, Burns J, Levin Met al., 2018, Diagnosis of Kawasaki disease using a minimal whole blood gene expression signature, JAMA Pediatrics, Vol: 172, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2168-6203

Importance There is no diagnostic test for Kawasaki disease (KD). Diagnosis is based on clinical features shared with other febrile conditions, frequently resulting in delayed or missed treatment and an increased risk of coronary artery aneurysms. Objective To identify a whole blood gene expression signature that distinguishes children with KD in the first week of illness from other febrile conditions.Design Case-control discovery study groups comprising training, test, and validation groups of children with KD or comparator febrile illness. Setting Hospitals in the UK, Spain, Netherlands and USA.Participants The training and test discovery group comprised 404 children with infectious and inflammatory conditions (78 KD, 84 other inflammatory diseases, 242 bacterial or viral infections) and 55 healthy controls. The independent validation group included 130 febrile children and 102 KD patients, including 72 in the first 7 days of illness.Exposures Whole blood gene expression was evaluated using microarrays, and minimal transcript sets distinguishing KD were identified using a novel variable selection method (Parallel Deterministic Model Search).Main outcomes and measures The ability of transcript signatures - implemented as Disease Risk Scores - to discriminate KD cases from controls, was assessed by Area Under the Curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity at the optimal cut-point according to Youden’s index. Results A 13-transcript signature identified in the discovery training set distinguished KD from other infectious and inflammatory conditions in the discovery test set with AUC, sensitivity, and specificity (95% confidence intervals (CI)) of 96.2% (92.5-99.9), 81.7% (60.0-94.8), and 92.1% (84.0-97.0), respectively. In the validation set, the signature distinguished KD from febrile controls with AUC, sensitivity, and specificity (95% CI) of 94.6% (91.3-98.0), 85.9% (76.8-92.6), and 89.1% (83.0-93.7) respectively. The signature was applied to clinically defin

Journal article

Dunning J, Blankley S, Hoang LT, Cox M, Graham CM, James PL, Bloom CI, Chaussabel D, Banchereau J, Brett SJ, Moffatt MF, OGarra A, Openshaw PJMet al., 2018, Progression of whole-blood transcriptional signatures from interferon-induced to neutrophil-associated patterns in severe influenza, Nature Immunology, Vol: 19, Pages: 625-635, ISSN: 1529-2916

Transcriptional profiles and host-response biomarkers are used increasingly to investigate the severity, subtype and pathogenesis of disease. We now describe whole-blood mRNA signatures and concentrations of local and systemic immunological mediators in 131 adults hospitalized with influenza, from whom extensive clinical and investigational data were obtained by MOSAIC investigators. Signatures reflective of interferon-related antiviral pathways were common up to day 4 of symptoms in patients who did not require mechanical ventilator support; in those who needed mechanical ventilation, an inflammatory, activated-neutrophil and cell-stress or death (‘bacterial’) pattern was seen, even early in disease. Identifiable bacterial co-infection was not necessary for this ‘bacterial’ signature but was able to enhance its development while attenuating the early ‘viral’ signature. Our findings emphasize the importance of timing and severity in the interpretation of host responses to acute viral infection and identify specific patterns of immune-system activation that might enable the development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic tools for severe influenza.

Journal article

Shimizu C, Kim J, Eleftherohorinou H, Wright V, Hoang L, Tremoulet A, Franco A, Hibberd M, Takahashi A, Kubo M, Ito K, Tanaka T, Onouchi Y, Coin L, Levin M, Burns J, Shike Het al., 2017, Genetic Variants in HLA-C and Class I Pathway Genes Influence Susceptibility to Kawasaki Disease, 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting, Publisher: Wiley, ISSN: 2326-5205

Conference paper

Reuschl AK, Edwards MR, Parker R, Connell DW, Hoang L, Halliday A, Jarvis H, Siddiqui N, Wright C, Bremang S, Newton SM, Beverley P, Shattock R, Kon OM, Lalvani Aet al., 2017, Innate activation of human primary epithelial cells broadens the host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the airways, PLoS Pathogens, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1553-7366

Early events in the human airways determining whether exposure to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) results in acquisition of infection are poorly understood. Epithelial cells are the dominant cell type in the lungs, but little is known about their role in tuberculosis. We hypothesised that human primary airway epithelial cells are part of the first line of defense against Mtb-infection and contribute to the protective host response in the human respiratory tract. We modelled these early airway-interactions with human primary bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs) and alveolar macrophages. By combining in vitro infection and transwell co-culture models with a global transcriptomic approach, we identified PBECs to be inert to direct Mtb-infection, yet to be potent responders within an Mtb-activated immune network, mediated by IL1β and type I interferon (IFN). Activation of PBECs by Mtb-infected alveolar macrophages and monocytes increased expression of known and novel antimycobacterial peptides, defensins and S100-family members and epithelial-myleoid interactions further shaped the immunological environment during Mtb-infection by promoting neutrophil influx. This is the first in depth analysis of the primary epithelial response to infection and offers new insights into their emerging role in tuberculosis through complementing and amplifying responses to Mtb.

Journal article

Kim J, Shimizu C, Kingsmore SF, Veeraraghavan N, Levy E, Ribeiro Dos Santos AM, Yang H, Flatley J, Hoang LT, Hibberd ML, Tremoulet AH, Harismendy O, Ohno-Machado L, Burns JCet al., 2017, Whole genome sequencing of an African American family highlights toll like receptor 6 variants in Kawasaki disease susceptibility., PLoS One, Vol: 12

Kawasaki disease (KD) is the most common acquired pediatric heart disease. We analyzed Whole Genome Sequences (WGS) from a 6-member African American family in which KD affected two of four children. We sought rare, potentially causative genotypes by sequentially applying the following WGS filters: sequence quality scores, inheritance model (recessive homozygous and compound heterozygous), predicted deleteriousness, allele frequency, genes in KD-associated pathways or with significant associations in published KD genome-wide association studies (GWAS), and with differential expression in KD blood transcriptomes. Biologically plausible genotypes were identified in twelve variants in six genes in the two affected children. The affected siblings were compound heterozygous for the rare variants p.Leu194Pro and p.Arg247Lys in Toll-like receptor 6 (TLR6), which affect TLR6 signaling. The affected children were also homozygous for three common, linked (r2 = 1) intronic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in TLR6 (rs56245262, rs56083757 and rs7669329), that have previously shown association with KD in cohorts of European descent. Using transcriptome data from pre-treatment whole blood of KD subjects (n = 146), expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses were performed. Subjects homozygous for the intronic risk allele (A allele of TLR6 rs56245262) had differential expression of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) as a function of genotype (p = 0.0007) and a higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis. TLR6 plays an important role in pathogen-associated molecular pattern recognition, and sequence variations may affect binding affinities that in turn influence KD susceptibility. This integrative genomic approach illustrates how the analysis of WGS in multiplex families with a complex genetic disease allows examination of both the common disease-common variant and common disease-rare variant hypotheses.

Journal article

Chang DC, Hoang LT, Naim ANM, Dong H, Schreiber MJ, Hibberd ML, Tan MJA, Shi P-Yet al., 2016, Evasion of early innate immune response by 2 '-O-methylation of dengue genomic RNA, VIROLOGY, Vol: 499, Pages: 259-266, ISSN: 0042-6822

Journal article

Shimizu C, Eleftherohorinou H, Wright VJ, Kim J, Alphonse MP, Perry JC, Cimaz R, Burgner D, Dahdah N, Hoang LT, Khor CC, Salgado A, Tremoulet AH, Davila S, Kuijpers TW, Hibberd ML, Johnson TA, Takahashi A, Tsunoda T, Kubo M, Tanaka T, Onouchi Y, Yeung RS, Coin LJ, Levin M, Burns JCet al., 2016, Genetic variation in the SLC8A1 calcium signaling pathway is associated with susceptibility to Kawasaki disease and coronary artery abnormalities, Circulation. Cardiovascular Genetics, Vol: 9, Pages: 559-568, ISSN: 1942-3268

BACKGROUND: -Kawasaki disease (KD) is an acute pediatric vasculitis in which host genetics influence both susceptibility to KD and the formation of coronary artery aneurysms. Variants discovered by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and linkage studies only partially explain the influence of genetics on KD susceptibility. METHODS AND RESULTS: -To search for additional functional genetic variation, we performed pathway and gene stability analysis on a GWAS dataset. Pathway analysis using European GWAS data identified 100 significantly associated pathways (p< 5 ×10(-4)). Gene stability selection identified 116 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 genes that were responsible for driving the pathway associations and gene ontology analysis demonstrated enrichment for calcium transport (p=1.05 ×10(-4)). Three SNPs in solute carrier family 8 member 1 (SLC8A1), a sodium/calcium exchanger encoding NCX1, were validated in an independent Japanese GWAS dataset (metaanalysis p=0.0001). Patients homozygous for the A (risk) allele of rs13017968 had higher rates of coronary artery abnormalities (p=0.029). NCX1, the protein encoded by SLC8A1, was expressed in spindle-shaped and inflammatory cells in the aneurysm wall. Increased intracellular calcium mobilization was observed in B cell lines from healthy controls carrying the risk allele. CONCLUSIONS: -Pathway-based association analysis followed by gene stability selection proved to be a valuable tool for identifying risk alleles in a rare disease with complex genetics. The role of SLC8A1 polymorphisms in altering calcium flux in cells that mediate coronary artery damage in KD suggests that this pathway may be a therapeutic target and supports the study of calcineurin inhibitors in acute KD.

Journal article

Alphonse MP, Duong TT, Shimizu C, Hoang LT, McCrindle BW, Franco A, Schurmans S, Philpott DJ, Hibberd ML, Burns JC, Kuijpers TW, Yeung RSet al., 2015, Inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate 3-kinase C regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome activation in Kawasaki disease, 11th International Kawasaki Disease Symposium (IKDS), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Alphonse MP, Duong TT, Shimizu C, Hoang LT, McCrindle BW, Franco A, Schurmans S, Philpott DJ, Hibberd ML, Burns JC, Kuijpers TW, Yeung RSet al., 2015, Inositol 1,4,5 triphosphate 3-kinase C regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome activation in Kawasaki disease, 11th International Kawasaki Disease Symposium (IKDS), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Parsaud L, Moolani Y, Duong TT, Lau AC, Keong GT, Hoang LT, Watts TH, Hibberd ML, Yeung RSet al., 2015, Costimulation Mediated T-cell Survival Excerbates Kawasaki Disease, 11th International Kawasaki Disease Symposium (IKDS), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Hoang LT, Shimizu C, Ling L, Naim ANM, Khor CC, Tremoulet AH, Wright V, Levin M, Hibberd ML, Burns JCet al., 2014, Global gene expression profiling identifies new therapeutic targets in acute Kawasaki disease, GENOME MEDICINE, Vol: 6, ISSN: 1756-994X

Journal article

Long TH, Tolfvenstam T, Ooi EE, Khor CC, Naim ANM, Ho EXP, Ong SH, Wertheim HF, Fox A, Chau VVN, Ngoc MN, Tuan MH, Anh TNT, Tambayah P, Lin R, Sangsajja C, Manosuthi W, Chuchottaworn C, Sansayunh P, Chotpitayasunondh T, Suntarattiwong P, Chokephaibulkit K, Puthavathana P, de Jong MD, Farrar J, van Doorn HR, Hibberd MLet al., 2014, Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity, PLOS ONE, Vol: 9, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Utami KH, Winata CL, Hillmer AM, Aksoy I, Long HT, Liany H, Yan ECG, Mathavan S, Hong STK, Korzh V, Sarda P, Davila S, Cacheux Vet al., 2014, Impaired Development Of Neural-Crest Cell Derived Organs and Intellectual Disability Caused ByMED13LHaploinsufficiency, Human Mutation, Pages: n/a-n/a, ISSN: 1059-7794

Journal article

Tan AT, Long TH, Chin D, Rasmussen E, Lopatin U, Hart S, Bitter H, Chu T, Gruenbaum L, Ravindran P, Zhong H, Gane E, Lim SG, Chow WC, Chen P-J, Petric R, Bertoletti A, Hibberd MLet al., 2014, Reduction of HBV replication prolongs the early immunological response to IFN alpha therapy, JOURNAL OF HEPATOLOGY, Vol: 60, Pages: 54-61, ISSN: 0168-8278

Journal article

Long TH, Khor CC, Naim ANM, Ling L, Shimizu C, Hibberd ML, Burns JCet al., 2013, Global Gene Expression Profiles Reveal Genetic Signatures Of Kawasaki Disease and Disease Outcome, 77th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Rheumatology / 48th Annual Meeting of the Association-of-Rheumatology-Health-Professionals, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: S801-S801, ISSN: 0004-3591

Conference paper

Tacke CE, Breunis WB, Hoang LT, Png E, Geissler J, Nagelkerke S, Ellis J, Davila S, Khor CC, Levin M, Burgner D, Shimizu C, Burns JC, Hibberd ML, Kuijpers TWet al., 2013, Fc-Gamma Receptor Genetic Variation In Kawasaki Disease, 77th Annual Meeting of the American-College-of-Rheumatology / 48th Annual Meeting of the Association-of-Rheumatology-Health-Professionals, Publisher: WILEY-BLACKWELL, Pages: S71-S71, ISSN: 0004-3591

Conference paper

Nguyet MN, Chau NBT, Lam KP, Kien THD, Huy LAH, Farrar J, Quyen THN, Hien TT, Chau VVN, Merson L, Long TH, Hibberd ML, Aw PPK, Wilm A, Nagarajan N, Dung TN, Mai PP, Truong TN, Javanbakht H, Klumpp K, Hammond J, Petric R, Wolbers M, Chinh TN, Simmons CPet al., 2013, A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Balapiravir, a Polymerase Inhibitor, in Adult Dengue Patients, JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 207, Pages: 1442-1450, ISSN: 0022-1899

Journal article

Nguyen THT, Nguyen THQ, Vu TT, Farrar J, Hoang TL, Dong THT, Ngoc Tran V, Phung KL, Wolbers M, Whitehead SS, Hibberd ML, Wills B, Simmons CPet al., 2013, Corticosteroids for dengue - why don't they work?, PLoS Negl Trop Dis, Vol: 7

BACKGROUND: Dysregulated immune responses may contribute to the clinical complications that occur in some patients with dengue. FINDINGS: In Vietnamese pediatric dengue cases randomized to early prednisolone therapy, 81 gene-transcripts (0.2% of the 47,231 evaluated) were differentially abundant in whole-blood between high-dose (2 mg/kg) prednisolone and placebo-treated patients two days after commencing therapy. Prominent among the 81 transcripts were those associated with T and NK cell cytolytic functions. Additionally, prednisolone therapy was not associated with changes in plasma cytokine levels. CONCLUSION: The inability of prednisolone treatment to markedly attenuate the host immune response is instructive for planning future therapeutic strategies for dengue.

Journal article

Ogata S, Shimizu C, Franco A, Touma R, Kanegaye JT, Choudhury BP, Naidu NN, Kanda Y, Hoang LT, Hibberd ML, Tremoulet AH, Varki A, Burns JCet al., 2013, Treatment response in Kawasaki disease is associated with sialylation levels of endogenous but not therapeutic intravenous immunoglobulin G., PLoS One, Vol: 8

OBJECTIVES: Although intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is highly effective in Kawasaki disease (KD), mechanisms are not understood and 10-20% of patients are treatment-resistant, manifesting a higher rate of coronary artery aneurysms. Murine models suggest that α2-6-linked sialic acid (α2-6Sia) content of IVIG is critical for suppressing inflammation. However, pro-inflammatory states also up-regulate endogenous levels of β-galactoside:α2-6 sialyltransferase-I (ST6Gal-I), the enzyme that catalyzes addition of α2-6Sias to N-glycans. We asked whether IVIG failures correlated with levels of α2-6Sia on infused IVIG or on the patient's own endogenous IgG. METHODS: We quantified levels of α2-6Sia in infused IVIG and endogenous IgG from 10 IVIG-responsive and 10 resistant KD subjects using multiple approaches. Transcript levels of ST6GAL1, in patient whole blood and B cell lines were evaluated by RT-PCR. Plasma soluble (s)ST6Gal-I levels were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: There was no consistent difference in median sialylation levels of infused IVIG between groups. However, α2-6Sia levels in endogenous IgG, ST6GAL1 transcript levels, and ST6Gal-I protein in serum from IVIG-resistant KD subjects were lower than in responsive subjects at both pre-treatment and one-year time points (p <0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our data indicate sialylation levels of therapeutic IVIG are unrelated to treatment response in KD. Rather, lower sialylation of endogenous IgG and lower blood levels of ST6GALI mRNA and ST6Gal-I enzyme predict therapy resistance. These differences were stable over time, suggesting a genetic basis. Because IVIG-resistance increases risk of coronary artery aneurysms, our findings have important implications for the identification and treatment of such individuals.

Journal article

Khor CC, Tran NBC, Pang J, Davila S, Hoang TL, Ong RTH, Dunstan SJ, Wills B, Farrar J, Ta VT, Tran TG, Nguyen TNB, Le TT, Le BL, Nguyen MT, Nguyen THT, Mai NL, Nguyen MN, Nguyen TH, Nguyen VC, Tran TT, Tan DEK, Sakuntabhai A, Teo Y-Y, Hibberd ML, Simmons CPet al., 2011, Genome-wide association study identifies susceptibility loci for dengue shock syndrome at MICB and PLCE1, NATURE GENETICS, Vol: 43, Pages: 1139-U134, ISSN: 1061-4036

Journal article

Long TH, Lynn DJ, Henn M, Birren BW, Lennon NJ, Phuong TL, Kien THD, Tham THN, Lanh NM, Farrar JJ, Hibberd ML, Simmons CPet al., 2010, The Early Whole-Blood Transcriptional Signature of Dengue Virus and Features Associated with Progression to Dengue Shock Syndrome in Vietnamese Children and Young Adults, JOURNAL OF VIROLOGY, Vol: 84, Pages: 12982-12994, ISSN: 0022-538X

Journal article

Long HT, Hibberd ML, Hien TT, Dung NM, Van Ngoc T, Farrar J, Wills B, Simmons CPet al., 2009, Patterns of Gene Transcript Abundance in the Blood of Children with Severe or Uncomplicated Dengue Highlight Differences in Disease Evolution and Host Response to Dengue Virus Infection, JOURNAL OF INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 199, Pages: 537-546, ISSN: 0022-1899

Journal article

Hoang LT, 2007, Whole blood transcriptional profiles association with dengue shock syndrome, 56th Annual Meeting of the American-Society-of-Tropical-Medicine-and-Hygiene, Publisher: AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE, Pages: 1-1, ISSN: 0002-9637

Conference paper

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