Imperial College London

Professor Luc Vandeperre

Faculty of EngineeringDepartment of Materials

Professor of Structural Ceramics
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 6766l.vandeperre

 
 
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Location

 

LM.04CRoyal School of MinesSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Advanced Structural Ceramics - MATE97021

Aims

  • To review microstructural aspects of the behaviour of major ceramic families such as alumina, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, zirconia and glass and contrast microstructural control aimed at increases strength with microstructural approaches aiming to improve toughness to offer a reference frame in which to understand current research and development
  • To clarify the need for composites and to contrast the mechanical response of ceramic composites with that of monoliths
  • To re-examine the general theoretical concepts underpinning the structural performance of materials developed in MSE.203 Mechanical behaviour with an aim to strengthen the students ability to apply the general principles to ceramics
  • To explore the transitions in mechanical behaviour and relate these to the different micro-mechanism of deformation that act in ceramics so that students can judge how microstructure, time, scale and deformation rate can alter the response
  • To explain the concepts underpinning the state-of-the-art methodologies, which can be used to design monolithic ceramic components with confidence
  • To train students in fractography of ceramics
  • To discuss high temperature ceramics, the various forms in which these materials are used such as coatings, fibres and composites and how they are made.
  • To examine the fundamental quantitative factors that control stability, mechanical performance and damage accumulation under service conditions.

 

Role

Course Leader

Advanced Structural Ceramics - MATE97020

Aims

  • To review microstructural aspects of the behaviour of major ceramic families such as alumina, silicon carbide, silicon nitride, zirconia and glass and contrast microstructural control aimed at increases strength with microstructural approaches aiming to improve toughness to offer a reference frame in which to understand current research and development
  • To clarify the need for composites and to contrast the mechanical response of ceramic composites with that of monoliths
  • To re-examine the general theoretical concepts underpinning the structural performance of materials developed in MSE.203 Mechanical behaviour with an aim to strengthen the students ability to apply the general principles to ceramics
  • To explore the transitions in mechanical behaviour and relate these to the different micro-mechanism of deformation that act in ceramics so that students can judge how microstructure, time, scale and deformation rate can alter the response
  • To explain the concepts underpinning the state-of-the-art methodologies, which can be used to design monolithic ceramic components with confidence
  • To train students in fractography of ceramics
  • To discuss high temperature ceramics, the various forms in which these materials are used such as coatings, fibres and composites and how they are made.
  • To examine the fundamental quantitative factors that control stability, mechanical performance and damage accumulation under service conditions.

 

Role

Course Leader

Microstructure - MATE95004

Aims

This course is designed to allow students to progress in their understanding of thermodynamics and kinetics so as to allow them to investigate, explain and quantify the formation of microstructures by either solidification or by solid state phase transformations. It introduces them to a wide range of solid state phase transformations and through detailed analysis equips them with an insight into the scientific concepts underpinning the control of microstructures in primarily metals but also to some extent ceramics. This course also aims to: show how equilibrium phase diagrams can be used to predict the solidification process and the microstructure of materials that have been crystallised from a melt under equilibrium conditions; consider the effect of non-equilibrium solidification processes; and introduce examples from alloy, ceramic and glass-ceramic systems.

 

 

Role

Course Leader

Integrated Materials Engineering - MATE96001

Role

Lecturer