Imperial College London

DrMagdaCharalambous

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences

Principal Teaching Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 5372m.charalambous

 
 
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Location

 

505Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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18 results found

Chiu Y-LT, Wong B, Charalambous M, 2021, ‘It’s for others to judge’: what influences students’ construction of the ideal student?, Journal of Further and Higher Education, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 0309-877X

Recognising the changing landscape and financial costs, changes in the higher education sector continue to challenge the purpose and operations of universities, notably the shift towards student consumerism. Given this, what it means to be a student in contemporary higher education can evolve and would arguably have implications about the expectations of university students and staff for learning and teaching practice. To promote greater transparency of expectations, this paper develops the concept of the ideal student further with closer look into the spheres of influence that shape university students’ construction of the ideal student. We draw on 23 focus groups with 105 university students to explore the key factors that contribute to how the ideal student is developed and recognised. Our findings indicate that students’ construction of the ideal student is closely shaped by and rooted in their prior educational experiences, interaction with their peers and the curriculum, and perceptions of lecturers, institution and employer expectations. All these influences lead to a fluid and complex negotiation process as students navigate the meanings of being a university student. We conclude with practical implications for learning, teaching and curriculum development in higher education. The paper therefore provides a platform for key stakeholders to discuss different influencing factors as we support student transition and progression and manage their expectations of higher education.

Journal article

Cooke J, Araya Y, Bacon KL, Bagniewska JM, Batty LC, Bishop TR, Burns M, Charalambous M, Daversa DR, Dougherty LR, Dyson M, Fisher AM, Forman D, Garcia C, Harney E, Hesselberg T, John EA, Knell RJ, Maseyk K, Mauchline AL, Peacock J, Pernetta AP, Pritchard J, Sutherland WJ, Thomas RL, Tigar B, Wheeler P, White RL, Worsfold NT, Lewis Zet al., 2021, Teaching and learning in ecology: a horizon scan of emerging challenges and solutions, Oikos, Vol: 130, Pages: 15-28, ISSN: 0030-1299

We currently face significant, anthropogenic, global environmental challenges and the role of ecologists in mitigating these challenges is arguably more important than ever. Consequently there is an urgent need to recruit and train future generations of ecologists, both those whose main area is ecology, but also those involved in the geological, biological and environmental sciences.Here we present the results of a horizon scanning exercise that identified current and future challenges facing the teaching of ecology, through surveys of teachers, students and employers of ecologists. Key challenges identified were grouped in terms of the perspectives of three groups: students, for example the increasing disconnect between people and nature; teachers, for example the challenges associated with teaching the quantitative skills that are inherent to the study of ecology; and society, for example poor societal perceptions of the field of ecology.In addition to the challenges identified, we propose a number of solutions developed at a workshop by a team of ecology teaching experts, with supporting evidence of their potential to address many of the problems raised. These proposed solutions include developing living labs, teaching students to be ecological entrepreneurs and influencers, embedding skills‐based learning and coding in the curriculum, an increased role for learned societies in teaching and learning, and using new technology to enhance fieldwork studies including virtual reality, artificial intelligence and real‐time spoken language translation.Our findings are focused towards UK higher education, but they should be informative for students and teachers of a wide range of educational levels, policy makers and professional ecologists worldwide.

Journal article

Charalambous M, Hodge JA, Ippolito K, 2021, Statistically significant learning experiences: towards building self-efficacy of undergraduate statistics learners through team-based learning, Educational Action Research, Vol: 29, Pages: 226-244, ISSN: 0965-0792

Competence in statistics is a fundamental component of a biological scientist’s toolbox. However, anxiety often affects undergraduate students’ development of this competence and research has shown that perceived self-efficacy for statistics is correlated to academic performance. Self-efficacy may be promoted by reducing anxiety , and also allowing students to practice their skills in groups to model approaches used and obtain peer feedback. We undertook action research to investigate how a change in teaching method to team-based learning (TBL) affected our students. The first iteration of the teaching with Year 2 students led us to change our delivery to allow more time for teamworking for the next iteration with Year 1 students. We found that some measures of self-efficacy were correlated with a post-TBL summative test performance of Year 1 and Year 2 students. However, Year 1 students were less positive about TBL. This corroborated quantitative findings revealing that they had lower collective efficacy than Year 2 students, despite teams performing as well during formatively assessed TBL. We draw on self-efficacy theory to better understand why students perceive and report differing learning experiences, and to make recommendations for designing teaching and learning that helps build their self-efficacy.

Journal article

Charalambous M, 2019, Variation in transition to university of life science students: exploring the role of academic and social self-efficacy, Journal of Further and Higher Education, Vol: 44, Pages: 1419-1432, ISSN: 0013-1326

A mixed-method study was undertaken to investigate factors affecting the transition to university of life sciences students at a research-intensive UK university. Questionnaire responses (N= 234) suggested that undergraduate students tended to agree that they had successfully transitioned to university level study in the first year. However, disproportionately more female students had a definite negative view of their success and this correlated with the lower first-year performance of female BSc Biological Sciences students. Focus groups with second-year female BSc Biological Sciences students revealed that they viewed transition as a period of great academic and social change. Through the lens of a transition model developed from Bean and Eaton’s model of student retention, it was seen that both academic and social self-efficacy were important in facilitating transition, and were greatly aided by academic and social relationships with peers and academics. The timing of self-reported successful transition varied between students, with some students not transitioning academically and/or socially until the second year. Recommendations are that student academic self-efficacy should be promoted through helping students gain the necessary academic toolkit. Tutorials, peer-led sessions together with more social events could increase social self-efficacy and warrants further research.

Journal article

Smallegange IM, Thorne N, Charalambous M, 2012, Fitness trade-offs and the maintenance of alternative male morphs in the bulb mite (Rhizoglyphus robini), JOURNAL OF EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY, Vol: 25, Pages: 972-980, ISSN: 1010-061X

Journal article

dos Santos Grácio AJ, Shelley AJ, Raybould JN, Gil Forte JA, Charalambous M, Lowry CA, Nhaque AT, Molyneux D, Gracio MAAet al., 2009, ECO-EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE ONCHOCERCIASIS IN GUINEA BISSAU (WEST AFRICA): A REVIEW, Acta Parasitológica Portuguesa, ISSN: 0872-5292

Journal article

Charalambous M, Lowell S, Arzube M, Lowry CAet al., 2005, Isolation by distance and a chromosomal cline in the Cayapa cytospecies of Simulium exiguum, the vector of human onchocerciasis in Ecuador, GENETICA, Vol: 124, Pages: 41-59, ISSN: 0016-6707

Journal article

Charalambous M, Townson H, Harbach RE, Mukwaya LGet al., 1999, Electrophoretic and DNA identification of Anopheles bwambae and A-gambiae (Diptera : Culicidae) in western Uganda, BULLETIN OF ENTOMOLOGICAL RESEARCH, Vol: 89, Pages: 111-117, ISSN: 0007-4853

Journal article

Charalambous M, Arzube M, Lowell S, 1998, Cytogenetic analysis of a new subcomplex of Simulium exiguum (Diptera : Simuliidae) in Amazonian Ecuador, BULLETIN OF ENTOMOLOGICAL RESEARCH, Vol: 88, Pages: 247-255, ISSN: 0007-4853

Journal article

Charalambous M, Shelley AJ, Arzube M, 1997, The potential for dispersal of onchocerciasis in Ecuador in relation to the distribution of the vector Simulium exiguum (Diptera:Simuliidae), MEMORIAS DO INSTITUTO OSWALDO CRUZ, Vol: 92, Pages: 153-156, ISSN: 0074-0276

Journal article

Charalambous M, Lowry CA, Lowell S, Shelley AJ, Arzube Met al., 1997, The value of the larval head pattern for differentiating Simulium exiguum s l and S-gonzalezi (Diptera: Simuliidae) in the onchocerciasis focus of Ecuador, BULLETIN OF ENTOMOLOGICAL RESEARCH, Vol: 87, Pages: 19-24, ISSN: 0007-4853

Journal article

Charalambous M, Shelley AJ, Herzog MM, Dias APALet al., 1996, Four new cytotypes of the onchocerciasis vector blackfly Simulium guianense in Brazil, MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 10, Pages: 111-120, ISSN: 0269-283X

Journal article

CHARALAMBOUS M, SHELLEY AJ, GRACIO AJD, RAYBOULD JNet al., 1995, CYTOGENETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SIMULIUM-DAMNOSUM COMPLEX (DIPTERA, SIMULIUM) IN GUINEA-BISSAU (VOL 9, PG 34, 1995), MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 9, Pages: 330-330, ISSN: 0269-283X

Journal article

CHARALAMBOUS M, SHELLEY AJ, GRACIO AJD, RAYBOULD JNet al., 1995, CYTOGENETICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SIMULIUM-DAMNOSUM COMPLEX (DIPTERA, SIMULIIDAE) IN GUINEA-BISSAU, MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 9, Pages: 34-42, ISSN: 0269-283X

Journal article

CHARALAMBOUS M, BUTLIN RK, HEWITT GM, 1994, GENETIC-VARIATION IN MALE SONG AND FEMALE SONG PREFERENCE IN THE GRASSHOPPER CHORTHIPPUS-BRUNNEUS (ORTHOPTERA, ACRIDIDAE), ANIMAL BEHAVIOUR, Vol: 47, Pages: 399-411, ISSN: 0003-3472

Journal article

SANTOS GAJ, SHELLEY AJ, CHARALAMBOUS M, LOWRY CA, GRACIO MAA, FORTE JAG, RAYBOULD J, MOLYNEUX D, NHAQUE ATet al., 1994, ONCHOCERCIASIS IN GUINEA-BISSAU, WEST-AFRICA, PARASITE, Vol: 1, Pages: 6-7, ISSN: 1252-607X

Journal article

CHARALAMBOUS M, SHELLEY AJ, ARZUBE M, 1993, DISTRIBUTION AND TAXONOMIC STATUS OF CHROMOSOMAL FORMS OF THE ONCHOCERCIASIS VECTOR SIMULIUM-EXIGUUM IN CENTRAL ECUADOR, MEDICAL AND VETERINARY ENTOMOLOGY, Vol: 7, Pages: 299-303, ISSN: 0269-283X

Journal article

CHARALAMBOUS M, READY PD, SHELLEY AJ, ARZUBE M, LOWRY CAet al., 1993, CYTOLOGICAL AND ISOENZYME ANALYSIS OF THE BUCAY AND QUEVEDO CYTOTYPES OF THE ONCHOCERCIASIS VECTOR SIMULIUM-EXIGUUM (DIPTERA, SIMULIIDAE) IN ECUADOR, MEMORIAS DO INSTITUTO OSWALDO CRUZ, Vol: 88, Pages: 39-48, ISSN: 0074-0276

Journal article

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