Imperial College London

ProfessorMikeCrawford

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Professor of Mental Health Research
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 4161m.crawford

 
 
//

Assistant

 

Ms Nicole Hickey +44 (0)20 3313 4161

 
//

Location

 

Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

305 results found

Crawford MJ, King JD, McQuaid A, Bassett P, Leeson VC, Tella O, Di Simplicio M, Tyrer P, Tyrer H, Watt RG, Barnicot Ket al., 2024, Severe COVID anxiety among adults in the United Kingdom: cohort study and nested feasibility trial, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 24, ISSN: 1471-244X

Background:People with severe COVID anxiety have poor mental health and impaired functioning, but the course of severe COVID anxiety is unknown and the quality of evidence on the acceptability and impact of psychological interventions is low.Methods:A quantitative cohort study with a nested feasibility trial. Potential participants aged 18 and over, living in the UK with severe COVID anxiety, were recruited online and from primary care services. We examined levels of COVID anxiety in the six months after recruitment, and factors that influenced this, using linear regression. Those scoring above 20 on the short Health Anxiety Inventory were invited to participate in a feasibility trial of remotely delivered Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Health Anxiety (CBT-HA). Exclusion criteria were recent COVID-19, current self-isolation, or current receipt of psychological treatment. Key outcomes for the feasibility trial were the level of uptake of CBT-HA and the rate of follow-up.Results:204 (70.2%) of 285 people who took part in the cohort study completed the six month follow-up, for whom levels of COVID anxiety fell from 12.4 at baseline to 6.8 at six months (difference = -5.5, 95% CI = -6.0 to -4.9). Reductions in COVID anxiety were lower among older people, those living with a vulnerable person, those with lower baseline COVID anxiety, and those with higher levels of generalised anxiety and health anxiety at baseline. 36 (90%) of 40 participants enrolled in the nested feasibility trial were followed up at six months. 17 (80.9%) of 21 people in the active arm of the trial received four or more sessions of CBT-HA. We found improved mental health and social functioning among those in the active, but not the control arm of the trial (Mean difference in total score on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale between baseline and follow up, was 9.7 (95% CI = 5.8–13.6) among those in the active, and 1.0 (95% C.I. = -4.6

Journal article

King JD, McQuaid A, Leeson VC, Tella O, Crawford MJet al., 2024, Characterising subgroups of people with severe COVID anxiety by latent profile analysis, Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol: 344, Pages: 115-121, ISSN: 0165-0327

BACKGROUND: People with severe COVID anxiety have had experiences of the COVID-19 pandemic which are overwhelming, and have led to patterns of behaviours that add little protective benefit but are at the expense of other priorities in life. It appears to be a complex social and psychological phenomenon, influenced by demographic and social factors. Identifying subgroups of people with severe COVID anxiety would better place clinicians to assess and support this distress where indicated. METHODS: Measurement tools assessing depression, generalised and health anxiety, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, personality difficulty and alcohol use from 284 people living in United Kingdom with severe COVID anxiety were explored with latent profile analysis. Further analyses examined the associations of identified clusters with demographic and social factors and daily functioning, quality of life and protective behaviours. RESULTS: A model with 4 classes provided the best fit. Distinct patterns of psychopathology emerged which were variably associated with demographic factors and COVID behaviours. LIMITATIONS: Given the complex aetiology of COVID anxiety a number of factors which might better cluster subgroups are likely to have gone uncollected. Moreover, using data collected at a single time-point limits these results' ability to conclude whether observed relationships were the product of the pandemic or longstanding. CONCLUSIONS: People living with severe COVID anxiety are a heterogenous group. This analysis adds to evidence that certain health behaviours and demographic factors are inextricably linked to poor mental health in people with COVID anxiety, and that targeting health behaviours with specific intervention might be beneficial.

Journal article

Schlief M, Rich N, Rains LS, Baldwin H, Rojas-Garcia A, Nyikavaranda P, Persaud K, Dare C, French P, Lloyd-Evans B, Crawford M, Smith J, Kirkbride JB, Johnson Set al., 2023, Ethnic differences in receipt of psychological interventions in Early Intervention in Psychosis services in England - a cross-sectional study., Psychiatry Res, Vol: 330

There is some evidence of differences in psychosis care provision by ethnicity. We investigated variations in the receipt of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for psychosis (CBTp) and family intervention across ethnic groups in Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) teams throughout England, where national policy mandates offering these interventions to all. We included data on 29,610 service users from the National Clinical Audit of Psychosis (NCAP), collected between 2018 and 2021. We conducted mixed effects logistic regression analyses to examine odds ratios of receiving an intervention (CBTp, family intervention, either intervention) across 17 ethnic groups while accounting for the effect of years and variance between teams and adjusting for individual- (age, gender, occupational status) and team-level covariates (care-coordinator caseload, inequalities strategies). Compared with White British people, every minoritized ethnic group, except those of mixed Asian-White and mixed Black African-White ethnicities, had significantly lower adjusted odds of receiving CBTp. People of Black African, Black Caribbean, non-African/Caribbean Black, non-British/Irish White, and of "any other" ethnicity also experienced significantly lower adjusted odds of receiving family intervention. Pervasive inequalities in receiving CBTp for first episode psychosis exist for almost all minoritized ethnic groups, and family intervention for many groups. Investigating how these inequalities arise should be a research priority.

Journal article

Williams R, Morris A, Gupta V, Penington E, Cullen AE, Quirk A, French P, Lennox B, Bottle A, Crawford Met al., 2023, Predictors of positive patient reported outcomes from ‘Early Intervention in Psychosis’ – a national cross-sectional study, BMJ Mental Health, Vol: 26, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 2755-9734

BackgroundThe components of care delivered by Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) services vary, but the impact on patient experience is unknown. ObjectiveTo investigate associations between components of care provided by EIP services in England and patient-reported outcomes.Methods2374 patients from EIP services in England were surveyed during the National Clinical Audit of Psychosis. Participants were asked about the care they received, and completed the ‘Patient Global Impressions’ scale (rating whether their mental health had improved), and ‘Friends and Family Test’ (rating whether they would recommend their service). Information about service structure was obtained from service providers. We analysed associations between outcomes and components of care using multilevel regression. FindingsThe majority of participants were likely to recommend the treatment they had received (89.8%), and felt that their mental health had improved (89.0%). Participants from services where care coordinators had larger caseloads were less likely to recommend their care. Participants were more likely to recommend their care if they had been offered cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis, family therapy or targeted interventions for carers. Participants were more likely to report that their mental health had improved if they had been offered cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis or targeted interventions for carers. ConclusionsSpecific components of EIP care were associated with improved patient reported outcomes. Psychosocial interventions and carer support may be particularly important in optimising outcomes for patients.Clinical ImplicationsThese findings emphasise the need for small caseload sizes and comprehensive packages of treatment in EIP services.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Parker J, Kalwarowsky S, Stevens E, Iles J, Ramchandani P, Crawford Met al., 2023, Mother and clinician experiences of a trial of a video feedback parent-infant intervention for mothers experiencing difficulties consistent with 'personality disorder': A qualitative interview study, PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY-THEORY RESEARCH AND PRACTICE, Vol: 96, Pages: 480-503, ISSN: 1476-0835

Journal article

King J, McQuaid A, Leeson VC, Samuel O, Grant J, Imran Azeem MS, Barnicot K, Crawford Met al., 2023, The association of severe COVID anxiety with poor social functioning, quality of life, and protective behaviours among adults in United Kingdom: a cross-sectional study, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 23, ISSN: 1471-244X

Background:Anxiety about COVID-19 is common. For most people this is an appropriate response to the loss of livelihoods and loved-ones, disruptions to social networks, and uncertainty about the future. However, for others these anxieties relate to contracting the virus itself, a phenomenon termed COVID anxiety. Little is known about the characteristics of people with severe COVID anxiety or the impact it has on their daily lives.Methods:We conducted a two-phase cross-sectional survey of people aged 18 or over who were living in United Kingdom, self-identified as anxious about COVID-19, and had a score of ≥9 on the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale. We recruited participants nationally through online adverts and locally via primary care services in London. Data on demographic and clinical factors were used in multiple regression modelling to examine the greatest contributors to functional impairment, poor health-related quality of life and protective behaviours in this sample of individuals with severe COVID anxiety.Results:We recruited 306 people with severe COVID anxiety between January and September 2021. Most were female (n = 246, 81.2%); they had a median age of 41 (range = 18–83). The majority of participants also had generalised anxiety (n = 270, 91.5%), depression (n = 247, 85.5%), and a quarter (n = 79, 26.3%) reported a physical health condition which put them at increased risk of hospitalisation with COVID-19. Half had severe social dysfunction (n = 151, 52.4%). One in ten reported never leaving their home, one in three washed all items brought into their house, one in five washed their hands constantly, and one in five of those with children reported not sending them to school because of fears of COVID-19. Increasing co-morbid depressive symptoms best explained functional impairment and poor quality of life after controlling for other factors.Conclusions:This study highli

Journal article

Williams R, Penington E, Gupta V, Tsiachristas A, French P, Lennox B, Bottle A, Crawford MJet al., 2023, Predictors of positive outcomes from 'Early Intervention in Psychosis': protocol for a national retrospective cohort study., Front Psychiatry, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1664-0640

BACKGROUND: Psychotic disorders are severe and prevalent mental health conditions associated with long-term disability, reduced quality of life, and substantial economic costs. Early Intervention in Psychosis (EIP) services aim to provide timely and comprehensive treatment for psychotic disorders, and EIP service input is associated with improved outcomes. However, there is limited understanding of the specific components of EIP care that contribute to these improvements. There is significant nationwide variability in the commissioning and delivery of EIP, with individuals receiving different packages of components from different services. In this study, we seek to explore associations between EIP components and clinically significant outcomes, in order to understand the mechanisms underlying improved psychosis care. METHODS: This national retrospective cohort study will utilize data from the 2019 National Clinical Audit of Psychosis (NCAP), examining the care received by 10,560 individuals treated by EIP services in England. Exposure data from the NCAP, capturing the components of care delivered by EIP services, will be linked with outcome data from routine NHS Digital datasets over a three-year follow-up period. This will be the first study to use this method to examine this population in England. The primary outcomes will be surrogate measures of relapse of psychosis (hospital admission and referral to community-based crisis intervention services). Secondary outcomes include duration of admissions, emergency hospital attendances, episodes of detention under the Mental Health Act, and all-cause mortality. We will use multilevel regression to examine associations between exposures and outcome events. We will handle missing data using appropriate imputation techniques. DISCUSSION: This study aims to provide valuable insights into the long-term effects of variations in EIP service delivery. The study involves a large, diverse cohort including individuals treated by e

Journal article

Barnicot K, Welsh M, Kalwarowsky S, Stevens E, Iles J, Parker J, Miele M, Lawn T, O'Hanlon L, Sundaresh S, Ajala O, Bassett P, Jones C, Ramchandani P, Crawford Met al., 2022, Video feedback parent-infant intervention for mothers experiencing enduring difficulties in managing emotions and relationships: A randomised controlled feasibility trial, British Journal of Clinical Psychology, Vol: 61, Pages: 1188-1210, ISSN: 0144-6657

ObjectivesParents experiencing mental health difficulties consistent with “personality disorder”, often related to a history of complex trauma, may face increased challenges in parent–child relationships and child socioemotional development. There are no published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating perinatal parent–child interventions for this population. We evaluated the feasibility and acceptability of undertaking an RCT of the video feedback intervention for positive parenting adapted for perinatal mental health (VIPP-PMH).DesignFeasibility study incorporating a pilot RCT.MethodsMothers with enduring difficulties in managing emotions and relationships, consistent with a “personality disorder”, and their 6- to 36-month old infants were randomly allocated to receive six sessions of VIPP-PMH (n = 20) or usual care alone (n = 14).Results76% of eligible mothers consented to participate. Intervention uptake and completion rates were 95% (≥1 VIPP-PMH session) and 70% (6 sessions), respectively. Follow-up rates were 85% at month 5 and 65% at month 8 post-baseline. Blinded observer-ratings of maternal sensitivity in parent–child interaction favoured the intervention group at month 5 (RR = 1.94, 95% CI 0.67–5.63) and month 8 (RR = 1.91, 95% CI 0.68–5.33). Small changes over time in self-rated parenting confidence and stress favoured the intervention group. There were no clear intervention effects on maternal non-intrusiveness or mental health, or on child behaviour problems, emotional functioning, or self-regulation.ConclusionsAn RCT of VIPP-PMH is feasible and acceptable to implement with mothers experiencing difficulties consistent with perinatal “personality disorder”. A fully powered definitive RCT should be undertaken.

Journal article

Herttua K, Crawford M, Paljarvi T, Fazel Set al., 2022, Associations between antipsychotics and risk of violent crimes and suicidal behaviour in personality disorder, Evidence-Based Mental Health, Vol: 25, Pages: e58-e64, ISSN: 1362-0347

BACKGROUND: Despite uncertain benefits, people with personality disorder are commonly treated with antipsychotic medication. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between antipsychotics and violent crimes and suicidal behaviour in individuals with personality disorder. METHODS: We used nationwide Danish registries to identify all individuals with diagnosed personality disorder aged 18-64 years during 2007 to 2016. Antipsychotics were recorded in dispensed prescriptions, and individuals were followed up for police-recorded suspicions for violent crimes and healthcare presentations of suicidal behaviour. We applied a within-individual design where outcome rates for individuals with personality disorder during medicated periods were compared with rates during non-medicated periods. FINDINGS: The cohort included 166 328 people with diagnosed personality disorder, of whom 79 253 were prescribed antipsychotics, presented at least one outcome and were thus included in the within-individual analyses. Compared with periods when individuals were not on antipsychotic medication, violent crime suspicions were 40% lower (incident rate ratio (IRR) 0.60, 95% CI 0.55 to 0.63) in men and 10% lower (IRR 0.90, 95% CI 0.79 to 1.01) in women, while rates of suicidal behaviour were 32% lower both in men (IRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.71) and in women (IRR 0.68, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.70). In subgroup analyses, the magnitude of the association varied across specific personality disorders for criminal outcomes but less for suicidal behaviour, with largest association in dissocial personality disorder for violent criminality (IRR 0.53, 95% CI 0.47 to 0.59). CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with antipsychotics was associated with reduced risks for violent crime suspicions and suicidal behaviour among individuals with personality disorder. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Potential effects of antipsychotics on suicidal behaviour and violence should be taken into account when considering treatment

Journal article

Crawford M, Leeson V, McQuaid A, Samuel O, King J, Di Simplicio M, Tyrer P, Tyrer H, Watt R, Barnicot Ket al., 2022, Severe COVID anxiety among adults in the United Kingdom: protocol for a cohort study and nested feasibility trial of modified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Health Anxiety., BMJ Open, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2044-6055

IntroductionSome people are so anxious about COVID that it impairs their functioning. However, little is known about the course of severe COVID anxiety or what can be done to help people who experience it. Methods and analysisCohort study with a nested feasibility trial with follow-up at three and six months. We recruited 306 people who were aged 18 and over, lived in the United Kingdom and had severe COVID anxiety (indicated by a score of nine or more on the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale). To take part in the nested feasibility trial, participants also had to have a score of 20 or more on the Short Health Anxiety Inventory. We excluded people from the trial if they had had COVID-19 within the previous four weeks, if they were currently self-isolating or if they were already receiving psychological treatment. We publicised the study nationally through adverts, social media and posts on chat boards. We also recruited participants via clinicians working in primary and secondary care NHS services in London. All those in the active arm will be offered five to ten sessions of remotely delivered modified Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Health Anxiety (CBT-HA). We will examine the proportion of participants who remain above threshold on the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale at three and six months and factors that influence levels of COVID anxiety over six months using mixed-effects logistic regression. The key feasibility metrics for the nested trial are the level of uptake of CBT-HA and the rate of follow-up.Ethics and disseminationApproved by Leicester Central Research Ethics Committee (reference: 20/EM/0238). The results of the study will be published in peer-reviewed scientific journals. Trial registration: International Standard Randomised Control Trial Number Register - ISRCTN14973494

Journal article

Thana L, O'Connell L, Carne-Watson A, Shastri A, Budhwani N, Saranamuthu A, Jayacodi S, Leeson V, Munjiza J, Pappa S, Hughes E, Reilly J, Crawford Met al., 2022, Barriers to the management of sexual dysfunction among people with psychosis: analysis of qualitative data from the REMEDY trial, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1471-244X

Background: More than half of people who use antipsychotic medication for psychosis report having sexual dysfunction. The REMEDY trial aimed to find out if switching antipsychotic medication provides an effective way to reduce sexual dysfunction among people with psychosis. We set out to recruit 216 participants over a two-year period, but recruitment was stopped after an extended 12-month pilot phase, during which we recruited only 10 participants. As part of a nested process evaluation, we conducted qualitative interviews with front-line clinicians to examine barriers to recruitment to the trial.Methods: We developed a semi-structured interview schedule to explore staff views on factors that influenced whether they referred potential participants to the study. We interviewed a purposive sample of 51 staff from four National Health Service (NHS) Trusts in England, ensuring a range of different backgrounds, seniority, and levels of involvement in the trial. Audio recordings of interviews were transcribed for verbatim, and data were analysed using an inductive approach to thematic analysis. Results : Nine interconnected themes were generated. Six themes concerned barriers to recruitment; including; prioritising patients’ mental stability, mutual discomfort and embarrassment about discussing a “taboo” subject, and concerns about unintended consequences of asking people with psychosis about their sexual functioning. Three themes, including the quality of treatment relationships and strategies for opening dialogue suggested ways to improve recognition of these “hidden” side effects. Conclusion: The identification and management of sexual dysfunction among people with psychosis are not priorities for mental health services in England at this time. Many staff working in front-line services feel unprepared and uncomfortable asking people with psychosis about these problems. While greater use of screening tools may improve the identification of

Journal article

Williams R, Natkulasingam S, Tooke B, Webster E, Quirk A, Gupta V, French P, Smith J, Crawford MJet al., 2022, Examining the effects of national initiatives to improve the physical health of people with psychosis in England: secondary analysis of data from the National Clinical Audit of Psychosis, BJPsych Bulletin, Vol: 46, Pages: 140-147, ISSN: 2056-4694

Aims and Methods:To examine whether national initiatives have led to improvements in the physical health of people with psychosis. Secondary analysis of a national audit of services for people with psychosis. Proportions of patients in ‘good health’ according to seven measures, and one composite measure derived from national standards, were compared between multiple rounds of data collection.Results:The proportion of patients in overall ‘good health’ under the care of ‘Early Intervention in Psychosis’ teams increased from 2014–2019, particularly for measures of smoking, alcohol and substance use. There was no overall change in the proportion of patients in overall ‘good health’ under the care of ‘Community Mental Health Teams’ from 2011–2017. However, there were improvements in alcohol use, blood glucose and lipid levels.Clinical implications:There have been modest improvements in the health of people with psychosis over the last nine years. Continuing efforts are required to translate these improvements into reductions in premature mortality.

Journal article

Crawford M, Leeson V, Evans R, Barrett B, McQuaid A, Cheshire J, Sanatina R, Lamph G, Sen P, Anagnostakis K, Millard L, Qurashi I, Larkin F, Husain N, Moran P, Barnes T, Paton C, Hoare Z, Picchioni M, Gibbon Set al., 2022, The clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of clozapine for inpatients with severe borderline personality disorder (CALMED study): A randomised placebo-controlled trial., Therapeutic Advances in Psychopharmacology, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 2045-1253

Background:Data from case series suggest that clozapine may benefit inpatients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), but randomised trials have not been conducted. Methods:Multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. We aimed to recruit 222 inpatients with severe BPD aged 18 or over, who had failed to respond to other antipsychotic medications. We randomly allocated participants on a 1:1 ratio to receive up to 400mg of clozapine per day or an inert placebo using a remote web-based randomisation service. The primary outcome was total score on the Zanarini Rating scale for Borderline Personality Disorder (ZAN-BPD) at six months. Secondary outcomes included self-harm, aggression, resource use and costs, side effects and adverse events. We used a modified intention to treat analysis (mITT) restricted to those who took one or more dose of trial medication, using a general linear model fitted at six months adjusted for baseline score, allocation group and site. Results:The study closed early due to poor recruitment and the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Of 29 study participants, 24 (83%) were followed up at six months, of whom 21 (72%) were included in the mITT analysis. At six months, 11 (73%) participants assigned to clozapine and 6 (43%) of those assigned to placebo were still taking trial medication. Adjusted difference in mean total ZAN-BPD score at six months was -3.86 (95% Confidence Intervals = -10.04 to 2.32, p=0.22). There were 14 serious adverse events; six in the clozapine arm and eight in the placebo arm of the trial. There was little difference in the cost of care between groups. Interpretation:We recruited insufficient participants to test the primary hypothesis. The study findings highlight problems in conducting placebo-controlled trials of clozapine and in using clozapine for people with BPD, outside specialist inpatient mental health units.Trial registrationISRCTN18352058. https://doi.org/10.1186/ISRCTN18352058

Journal article

Jha M, Barrett B, Brewin C, Bowker G, Harwood N, Jalil I, Crawford M, Phull J, Allen K, Duggan C, Yang M, Tyrer Pet al., 2022, Matching ICD-11 personality status to clinical management in a community team-The Boston (UK) Personality Project: Study protocol, Personality and Mental Health: multidisciplinary studies from personality dysfunction to criminal behaviour, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1932-8621

Epidemiological studies show 30% to 50% of all patients in community mental health teams have personality disorders. These are normally comorbid with other psychiatric disorders, often as Galenic syndromes, and are seldom identified. In the Boston (UK) Personality Project all patients under a community health service in Boston in Lincolnshire will be asked to agree to have their personality status assessed using scales recording the new ICD-11 classification, together with clinical ratings, social function and satisfaction. A control group of 100 patients from an adjacent service of similar demographics (Spalding) will also have similar ratings but no personality assessments. Changes in clinical status, social function and service satisfaction will be made after 6 and 12 months in both groups. The patients in the Boston group will be offered matched interventions using a stepped care approach for both the severity of disorder and its domain structure. These interventions will include shorter versions of existing psychological treatments, environmental therapies including nidotherapy, adaptive and acceptance models, drug reduction and social prescribing. Full costs of psychiatric care will be measured in both groups. The main hypothesis is that greater awareness of personality function will lead to better clinical outcomes and satisfaction.

Journal article

Barnicot K, Crawford M, Kalwarowsky S, Parker J, Iles Jet al., 2022, The BOOST Trial: Feasibility trial of a video feedback parent-infant intervention for parents with personality disorder and their infants, Publisher: ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD, Pages: LXXVII-LXXVII, ISSN: 0264-6838

Conference paper

Crawford M, Drummond C, 2022, Professor Robin Touquet, RD, FRCS, FRCP, FCEM obituary, Alcohol and Alcoholism, Vol: 57, ISSN: 0735-0414

Journal article

Foye U, Stuart R, Trevillion K, Oram S, Allen D, Broeckelmann E, Jeffreys S, Jeynes T, Crawford MJ, Moran P, McNicholas S, Billings J, Dale O, Simpson A, Johnson Set al., 2022, Clinician views on best practice community care for people with complex emotional needs and how it can be achieved: a qualitative study, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1471-244X

BackgroundIndividuals with Complex Emotional Needs (CEN) services, a working description to refer to the needs experienced by people who may have been diagnosed with a “personality disorder”, face premature mortality, high rates of co-morbidity, service user and treatment costs. Service provision for this population is recurrently identified as needing to be transformed: there are serious concerns about quality, accessibility, fragmentation of the service system and the stigma and therapeutic pessimism service users encounter. Understanding clinician perspectives is vital for service transformation, as their views and experiences shed light on potential barriers to achieving good care, and how these might be overcome. In this study, we aimed to explore these views.MethodsWe used a qualitative interview design. A total of fifty participants from a range of professions across specialist and generic community mental health services across England who provide care to people with CEN took part in six focus groups and sixteen one-to-one interviews. We analysed the data using a thematic approach.FindingsMain themes were: 1) Acknowledging the heterogeneity of needs: the need for a person-centred care approach and flexibility when working with CEN, 2) ‘Still a diagnosis of exclusion’: Exploring the healthcare provider-level barriers to providing care, and 3) Understanding the exclusionary culture: exploring the system-based barriers to providing care for CEN. Across these themes, staff highlighted in particular the need for care that was person-centred, relational, empathic, and trauma informed. Major barriers to achieving this are stigmatising attitudes and behaviour towards people with CEN, especially in generic mental health services, lack of development of coherent service systems offering clear long-term pathways and ready access to high quality treatment, and lack of well-developed structures for staff training and support.DiscussionOverall, the

Journal article

Trevillion K, Stuart R, Ocloo J, Broeckelmann E, Jeffreys S, Jeynes T, Allen D, Russell J, Billings J, Crawford MJ, Dale O, Haigh R, Moran P, McNicholas S, Nicholls V, Foye U, Simpson A, Lloyd-Evans B, Johnson S, Oram Set al., 2022, Service user perspectives of community mental health services for people with complex emotional needs: a co-produced qualitative interview study, BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 22, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 1471-244X

BackgroundThere is consensus that services supporting people with complex emotional needs are part of a mental health care system in which change is needed. To date, service users’ views and co-production initiatives have had little impact on the development of interventions and care. This needs to change, and our paper evidences the experiences and perspectives of a diverse range of people on how community services can best address the needs of people with complex emotional needs.MethodsA co-produced qualitative research study. Lived experience researchers led data collection and analysis. Individual interviews were conducted with 30 people across England who had a diverse range of experiences and perspectives of using community services for complex emotional needs. Participants were asked about their experiences of using community services for their mental health, and views on how community services can best address their needs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.ResultsParticipants reported some experiences of good practice but also of experiences of severely stigmatising interventions, a lack of effective support and service fragmentation. Relational Practice was identified as the central overarching theme and describes how community services can best support people with complex emotional needs. This approach involves care delivered in a non-stigmatising, individualised and compassionate way and care that is trauma-informed. It involves care that is planned collaboratively with service users to ensure their multiple needs are addressed in a flexible, holistic and consistent way which accounts for the long-term and fluctuating nature of their needs.ConclusionsRelational practice approaches have potential to facilitate better community care for people with complex emotional needs. Research and service development are needed to examine how best to implement such approaches across the mental health service system. This work must be co-produced with

Journal article

Crawford M, McQuaid A, Sanatinia R, Farquharson L, Quirk A, David Bet al., 2021, Patient experience of lasting negative effects of psychological interventions for anxiety and depression in secondary mental health care services: A national cross-sectional study., BMC Psychiatry, Vol: 21, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 1471-244X

BackgroundPatients who undergo psychological treatment can report both negative and positive effects, but evidence of factors influencing the likelihood of negative effects is limited.AimsTo identify aspects of the organisation and delivery of secondary care psychological treatment services that are associated with patient experiences of negative effects.MethodCross-sectional survey of people with anxiety and depression who ended psychological treatment delivered by 50 NHS trusts in England. Respondents were asked about how their treatment was organised and delivered and whether they experienced lasting negative effects.ResultsOf 662 respondents, 90 (14.1%) reported experiencing lasting negative effects. People over the age of 65 were less likely than younger respondents to report negative effects. There was an association between reporting neutral or negative effects and not being referred at what respondents considered to be the right time (OR = 1.712, 95% CI = 1.078–2.726), not receiving the right number of sessions (OR = 3.105, 95% CI = 1.934–4.987), and not discussing progress with their therapist (OR 2.063, 95% CI = 1.290–3.301).ConclusionsOne in seven patients who took part in this survey reported lasting negative effects from psychological treatment. Steps should be taken to prepare people for the potential for negative experiences of treatment, and progress reviewed during therapy in an effort to identify and prevent negative effects.

Journal article

Botham J, Clark A, Steare T, Stuart R, Oram S, Lloyd-Evans B, Jeynes T, Broeckelmann E, Crawford M, Johnson S, Simpson A, McCrone Pet al., 2021, Community interventions for people with complex emotional needs that meet the criteria for personality disorder diagnoses: systematic review of economic evaluations and expert commentary, BJPSYCH OPEN, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2056-4724

Journal article

Tyrer P, Tyrer H, Yang M, Crawford Met al., 2021, Is social function a good proxy measure of personality disorder?, Personality and Mental Health: multidisciplinary studies from personality dysfunction to criminal behaviour, Vol: 15, Pages: 261-272, ISSN: 1932-8621

Background:Personality assessment is often difficult and proxy measures may be useful. Aims: To examine the assessment of social functioning in relationship to personality disorder. Method:Secondary analysis of data from three clinical studies; following deliberate self-harm (n=460), cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety (n=444), and a 30-year follow up of 200 anxious/depressed patients. Social function and personality were assessed using the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ) and the Personality Assessment Schedule. A five item short version of the SFQ, the Short Social Functioning Questionnaire (SSFQ) was also developedResults:The SFQ score in the first two studies (area under curve (AUC) 0.64 and 0.65) partly predicted personality status; in the third study this achieved close agreement (AUC SFQ 0.85 (95% CI 0.8-0.9; AUC SSFQ 0.84 (95% CI 0.78-0.89). In all studies social function deteriorated linearly with increasing personality pathology. Cut-off points of 4 on the SSFQ and 7 on the SFQ had high sensitivity (SSFQ 82-90%; SFQ 82-83%) and acceptable specificity (SSFQ 66-75%; SFQ 69-75%) in identifying personality disorder in the third study. Conclusions: Social functioning recorded in either a 5-item or 8-item self-rating is a useful proxy measure of personality disturbance, and may be the core of disorder.

Journal article

Lodder A, Mehay A, Pavlickova H, Hoare Z, Box L, Butt J, Weaver T, Crawford MJ, Clutterbuck D, Westbrook N, Manning K, Karlsen S, Morris S, Brand A, Ramchandani P, Kelly Y, Heilmann A, Watt RGet al., 2021, Evaluating the effectiveness and cost effectiveness of the 'strengthening families, strengthening communities' group-based parenting programme: study protocol and initial insights, BMC Public Health, Vol: 21, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1471-2458

BackgroundUp to 20% of UK children experience socio-emotional difficulties which can have serious implications for themselves, their families and society. Stark socioeconomic and ethnic inequalities in children’s well-being exist. Supporting parents to develop effective parenting skills is an important preventive strategy in reducing inequalities. Parenting interventions have been developed, which aim to reduce the severity and impact of these difficulties. However, most parenting interventions in the UK focus on early childhood (0–10 years) and often fail to engage families from ethnic minority groups and those living in poverty. Strengthening Families, Strengthening Communities (SFSC) is a parenting programme designed by the Race Equality Foundation, which aims to address this gap. Evidence from preliminary studies is encouraging, but no randomised controlled trials have been undertaken so far.Methods/designThe TOGETHER study is a multi-centre, waiting list controlled, randomised trial, which aims to test the effectiveness of SFSC in families with children aged 3–18 across seven urban areas in England with ethnically and socially diverse populations. The primary outcome is parental mental well-being (assessed by the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-Being Scale). Secondary outcomes include child socio-emotional well-being, parenting practices, family relationships, self-efficacy, quality of life, and community engagement. Outcomes are assessed at baseline, post intervention, three- and six-months post intervention. Cost effectiveness will be estimated using a cost-utility analysis and cost-consequences analysis. The study is conducted in two stages. Stage 1 comprised a 6-month internal pilot to determine the feasibility of the trial. A set of progression criteria were developed to determine whether the stage 2 main trial should proceed. An embedded process evaluation will assess the fidelity and acceptability of the intervention.DiscussionIn t

Journal article

Sanatinia R, Burns A, Crome P, Gordon F, Hood C, Lee W, Quirk A, Seers K, Staniszewska S, Zafarani G, Crawford Met al., 2021, Factors associated with shorter length of admission among people with dementia in England and Wales: Retrospective cohort study., BMJ Open, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-7, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objectives To identify aspects of the organisation and delivery of acute inpatient services for people with dementia that are associated with shorter length of hospital stay.Design and setting Retrospective cohort study of patients admitted to 200 general hospitals in England and Wales.Participants 10 106 people with dementia who took part in the third round of National Audit of Dementia.Main outcome measure Length of admission to hospital.Results The median length of stay was 12 days (IQR=6–23 days). People with dementia spent less time in hospital when discharge planning was initiated within 24 hours of admission (estimated effect −0.24, 95% CI: −0.29 to −0.18, p<0.001). People from ethnic minorities had shorter length of stay (difference −0.066, 95% CI: −0.13 to −0.002, p=0.043). Patients with documented evidence of discussions having taken place between their carers and medical staff spent longer in hospital (difference 0.26, 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.32, p<0.001). These associations held true in a subsample of 669 patients admitted with hip fracture and data from 74 hospitals with above average carer-rated quality of care.Conclusions The way that services for inpatients with dementia are delivered can influence how long they spend in hospital. Initiating discharge planning within the first 24 hours of admission may help reduce the amount of time that people with dementia spend in hospital.

Journal article

Guo B, Li L, Crawford MJ, Morriss Ret al., 2021, The factor structure of the Zanarini Rating Scale for Borderline Personality Disorder: Exploratory Structural Equation Modelling and measurement invariance over time, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH, Vol: 30, ISSN: 1049-8931

Journal article

Barnicot K, Redknap C, Coath F, Hommel J, Couldrey L, Crawford Met al., 2021, Patient experiences of therapy for borderline personality disorder: Commonalities and differences between dialectical behaviour therapy and mentalization-based therapy and relation to outcomes, Psychology and Psychotherapy: theory, research and practice, Pages: 1-22, ISSN: 1476-0835

ObjectivesDialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) and mentalization-based therapy (MBT) are widely used evidence-based psychological treatments for borderline personality disorder (BPD). The study aimed to establish evidence on common and unique, and helpful and unhelpful, treatment processes.DesignMixed-methods.MethodsIn-depth qualitative interview data on patient experiences during treatment were combined with quantitative outcome measures in 73 patients diagnosed with a personality disorder and receiving DBT or MBT.ResultsAcross both DBT and MBT, accounts of learning not to react impulsively, learning to question one’s thoughts and assumptions, learning to communicate more effectively, and exposure to painful emotions that may previously have been avoided were each associated with less baseline-adjusted self-harm at the end of treatment. Difficulties in interacting with other group members were more likely to be described by patients receiving MBT than DBT, whilst difficulties in the therapeutic relationship were equally common. Both of these types of difficult experience were associated with higher baseline-adjusted levels of BPD traits and emotional dysregulation, at the end of the 12-month study period.ConclusionsThe findings identify novel evidence of common therapeutic processes across DBT and MBT that may help to reduce self-harm. The findings also highlight the potential iatrogenic effect of difficulties in the alliance with therapists or with other group members. This underscores the importance of listening to patients’ voices about what they are finding difficult during therapy and working to address these relational challenges, so that the patient is able to progress and make best use of the treatment.Practitioner pointsRegardless of whether dialectical behaviour therapy or mentalization based therapy is used, helping service-users to learn not to react impulsively, to question their thoughts and assumptions, and to communicate more effectively

Journal article

Tyrer P, Wang D, Crawford M, Dupont S, Cooper S, Nourmand S, Lazarevic V, Philip A, Tyrer Het al., 2021, Sustained benefit of cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients (CHAMP) over eight years: randomised controlled trial (vol 51, pg 1714, 2021), PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE, Vol: 51, Pages: 1723-1723, ISSN: 0033-2917

Journal article

Tyrer P, Wang D, Crawford M, Dupont S, Cooper S, Nourmand S, Lazarevic V, Philip A, Tyrer Het al., 2021, Sustained benefit of cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients (CHAMP) over 8 years: a randomised-controlled trial., Psychological Medicine, Vol: 51, Pages: 1714-1722, ISSN: 0033-2917

BACKGROUND: Health anxiety is an under-recognised but a frequent cause of distress. It is particularly common in general hospitals. METHODS: We carried out an 8-year follow-up of medical out-patients with health anxiety (hypochondriasis) enrolled in a randomised-controlled trial in five general hospitals in London, Middlesex and Nottinghamshire. Randomisation was to a mean of six sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy adapted for health anxiety (CBT-HA) or to standard care in the clinics. The primary outcome was a change in score on the Short Health Anxiety Inventory, with generalised anxiety and depression as secondary outcomes. Of 444 patients aged 16-75 years seen in cardiology, endocrinology, gastroenterology, neurology and respiratory medicine clinics, 306 (68.9%) were followed-up 8 years after randomisation, including 36 who had died. The study is registered with controlled-trials.com, ISRCTN14565822. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the HAI score in favour of CBT-HA over standard care after 8 years [1.83, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.25-3.40, p = 0.023], between group differences in generalised anxiety were less (0.54, 95% CI -0.29 to 1.36), p = 0.20, ns), but those for depression were greater at 8 years (1.22, 95% CI 0.42-2.01, p < 0.003) in CBT-HA than in standard care, most in standard care satisfying the criteria for clinical depression. Those seen by nurse therapists and in cardiology and gastrointestinal clinics achieved the greatest gains with CBT-HA, with greater improvement in both symptoms and social function. CONCLUSIONS: CBT-HA is a highly long-term effective treatment for pathological health anxiety with long-term benefits. Standard care for health anxiety in medical clinics promotes depression. Nurse therapists are effective practitioners.

Journal article

Trevillion K, Stuart R, Ocloo J, Broeckelmann E, Jeffreys S, Jeynes T, Allen D, Russell J, Billings J, Crawford MJ, Dale O, Haigh R, Moran P, McNicholas S, Nicholls V, Foye U, Simpson A, Lloyd-Evans B, Johnson S, Oram Set al., 2021, Service user perspectives of community mental health services for people with complex emotional needs: a co-produced qualitative interview study

<jats:title>Abstract</jats:title><jats:sec><jats:title>Background</jats:title><jats:p>There is consensus that services supporting people with complex emotional needs are part of a mental health care system in which change is needed. To date, service users’ views and co-production exercises have had little impact on the development of treatment and care. This needs to change, and our paper evidences the experiences and perspectives of a diverse range of people on how community services can best address the needs of people with complex emotional needs.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Methods</jats:title><jats:p>A co-produced qualitative research study. Lived experience researchers led data collection and analysis. Individual interviews were conducted with 30 people across England who had a diverse range of experiences and perspectives of using community services for complex emotional needs. Participants were asked about their experiences of using community services for their mental health, and views on how community services can best address their needs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data.</jats:p></jats:sec><jats:sec><jats:title>Results</jats:title><jats:p>Participants reported some experiences of good practice but also of experiences of severely stigmatising treatment, a lack of effective support and service fragmentation.<jats:italic>Relational Practice</jats:italic>was identified as the central overarching theme and describes how community services can best support people with complex emotional needs. This approach involves care delivered in a non-stigmatising, individualised, compassionate and trauma-informed manner. It involves care that is planned collaboratively with service users to ensure their multiple needs are addressed in a flexible, holistic and consistent way which accounts for the long-term and fluctuating

Working paper

Prevolnik Rupel V, Jagger B, Fialho LS, Chadderton L-M, Gintner T, Arntz A, Baltzersen A-L, Blazdell J, van Busschbach J, Cencelli M, Chanen A, Delvaux C, van Gorp F, Langford L, McKenna B, Moran P, Pacheco K, Sharp C, Wang W, Wright K, Crawford MJet al., 2021, Standard set of patient-reported outcomes for personality disorder, Quality of Life Research, Vol: 30, Pages: 3485-3500, ISSN: 0962-9343

PurposeThe purpose of the article is to present standard set of outcomes for people with personality disorder (PD), in order to facilitate patient outcome measurement worldwide.MethodsThe International Consortium for Health Outcomes Measurement (ICHOM) gathered a multidisciplinary international working group, consisting of 16 experts, including clinicians, nurses, psychologists, methodologists and patient representatives, to develop a standard set of outcome measures for people with PD. The Delphi method was used to reach consensus on the scope of the set, outcome domains, outcome measures, case-mix variables and time points for measuring outcomes in service users. For each phase, a project team prepared materials based on systematic literature reviews and consultations with experts.ResultsThe working group decided to include PD, as defined by International Classification of Diseases 11th revision (ICD-11). Eleven core outcomes and three optional outcomes across four health domains (mental health, behaviour, functioning and recovery) were defined as those relevant for people with PD. Validated measures for the selected outcomes were selected, some covering more than one outcome. Case-mix variables were aligned to other ICHOM mental health standard sets and consisted of demographic factors and those related to the treatment that people received. The group recommended that most outcomes are measured at baseline and annually.ConclusionThe international minimum standard set of outcomes has the potential to improve clinical decision making through systematic measurement and comparability. This will be key in improving the standard of health care for people with PD across the world.

Journal article

Romeu D, Guthrie E, Czoski-Murray C, Relton S, Walker A, Trigwell P, Hewison J, West R, Crawford M, Fossey M, Hulme C, House Aet al., 2021, Experiences of people seen in an acute hospital setting by liaison mental health services: responses from an online survey, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: S346-S346, ISSN: 2056-4724

Conference paper

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00304970&limit=30&person=true