Imperial College London

Professor Mick Crawley

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Life Sciences (Silwood Park)

Emeritus Professor of Plant Ecology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2216m.crawley Website

 
 
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Location

 

N2.17Silwood ParkSilwood Park

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

155 results found

Schleuss PM, Widdig M, Biederman LA, Borer ET, Crawley MJ, Kirkman KP, Seabloom EW, Wragg PD, Spohn Met al., 2021, Microbial substrate stoichiometry governs nutrient effects on nitrogen cycling in grassland soils, SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 155, ISSN: 0038-0717

Journal article

Widdig M, Schleuss P-M, Biederman LA, Borer ET, Crawley MJ, Kirkman KP, Seabloom EW, Wragg PD, Spohn Met al., 2020, Microbial carbon use efficiency in grassland soils subjected to nitrogen and phosphorus additions, SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 146, ISSN: 0038-0717

Journal article

Leverkus AB, Crawley MJ, 2020, Temporal variation in effect sizes in a long-term, split-plot field experiment., Ecology, Vol: 101, Pages: 1-21, ISSN: 0012-9658

Ecological field experiments initiate successional and evolutionary changes amongst resident species, yet effect sizes are often reported as if they were constants. Few ecological studies have addressed their questions through long-term, experimental approaches, and many questions remain unanswered regarding temporal patterns in ecological effect sizes. We document temporal variation in effect sizes in response to pulse and press manipulations in a long-term factorial field experiment at Nash's Field, England. The experiment comprises seven treatments applied in a split-plot design to test the single and interactive effects of herbivory by insects, molluscs and rabbits, liming, nutrient limitation (applied as press experiments), competition (exclusion of grasses or herbs with specific herbicides), and seed limitation (pulse experiments) on plant community dynamics. The response of all vascular plant species was followed for two decades. High species richness was positively related to the minus-grass herbicide in the first decade and negatively related to both nitrogen addition and the abundance of dominant species in both decades. Many significant effects appeared quickly, but some large effects were not detected until year 15. Press experiments produced some long-lasting effects, but effect sizes changed due to both idiosyncratic 'year effects' and secular trends. For pulse experiments, most effects -including positive and negative responses to herbicide application and the invasion of most of the sown species- disappeared quickly. However, some endured or grew monotonically, such as the invasion of two sown species that benefited from particular combinations of the press treatments. The fastest effects to appear were the responses from established species. Many of these responses were negative, likely resulting from reduced niche dimensionality and competitive exclusion by new dominant species. Contrarily, one of the largest community-level effects took well over

Journal article

Widdig M, Schleuss P-M, Weig AR, Guhr A, Biederman LA, Borer ET, Crawley MJ, Kirkman KP, Seabloom EW, Wragg PD, Spohn Met al., 2019, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Additions Alter the Abundance of Phosphorus-Solubilizing Bacteria and Phosphatase Activity in Grassland Soils, FRONTIERS IN ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE, Vol: 7

Journal article

Guignard MS, Crawley MJ, Kovalenko D, Nichols RA, Trimmer M, Leitch AR, Leitch IJet al., 2019, Interactions between plant genome size, nutrients and herbivory by rabbits, molluscs and insects on a temperate grassland, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 286, ISSN: 0962-8452

Journal article

Egan G, Zhou X, Wang D, Jia Z, Crawley MJ, Fornara Det al., 2018, Long-term effects of grassland management on soil microbial abundance: implications for soil carbon and nitrogen storage, BIOGEOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 141, Pages: 213-228, ISSN: 0168-2563

Journal article

Froy H, Borger L, Regan CE, Morris A, Morris S, Pilkington JG, Crawley MJ, Clutton-Brock TH, Pemberton JM, Nussey DHet al., 2018, Declining home range area predicts reduced late-life survival in two wild ungulate populations, ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 21, Pages: 1001-1009, ISSN: 1461-023X

Journal article

Egan G, Crawley MJ, Fornara DA, 2018, Effects of long-term grassland management on the carbon and nitrogen pools of different soil aggregate fractions, SCIENCE OF THE TOTAL ENVIRONMENT, Vol: 613, Pages: 810-819, ISSN: 0048-9697

Journal article

Heyburn J, McKenzie P, Crawley MJ, Fornara DAet al., 2017, Effects of grassland management on plant C:N:P stoichiometry: implications for soil element cycling and storage, ECOSPHERE, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2150-8925

Journal article

Heyburn J, McKenzie P, Crawley MJ, Fornara DAet al., 2017, Long-term belowground effects of grassland management: the key role of liming, ECOLOGICAL APPLICATIONS, Vol: 27, Pages: 2001-2012, ISSN: 1051-0761

Journal article

Heyburn J, McKenzie P, Crawley MJ, Fornara DAet al., 2017, Long-term belowground effects of grassland management: the key role of liming., Ecol Appl, Vol: 27, Pages: 2001-2012, ISSN: 1051-0761

The functioning of human-managed grassland ecosystems strongly depends on how common management practices will affect grassland "belowground compartment" including soil biogeochemistry and plant roots. Key questions remain about how animal grazing, liming (e.g., the addition of CaCO3 to soils), and nutrient fertilization might affect, in the long-term, soil nutrient cycling and multiple root traits. Here we focus on a mesotrophic grassland located in Berkshire, UK, where contrasting levels of rabbit grazing, liming, and different inorganic fertilizers have been applied since 1991. We ask how (1) soil nitrogen (N) availability and cycling, (2) total root mass, (3) root mass decomposition, and (4) arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF) root colonization might respond to 22 years of very different management. We found that liming strongly affected total root mass, root decomposition, root AMF colonization as well as soil N availability and cycling and that these effects were mainly driven by liming-induced increases in soil pH. Increases in soil pH were associated with significant (1) decreases in root mass, (2) increases in root mass decomposability and in the mineralization of N in decomposing root detritus, and (3) increases in AMF infection. Soil pH was also significantly related to greater N availability (i.e., soil NO3 levels) and to lower δ15 N natural abundance, which suggests more efficient N uptake by plants in limed soils as we found in our study. The application of multiple nutrients (N, P, K, Mg) also reduced total root mass, while N-only fertilization was associated with greater AMF infection. Surprisingly the long-term impact of grazing was generally weak and not significant on most plant and soil parameters. Despite soil pH affecting most belowground variables, changes in soil pH were not associated with any change in soil C and N stocks. Because liming can improve nutrient cycling (and benefits soil pH and grass yields) without negati

Journal article

Cenini VL, Fornara DA, McMullan G, Ternan N, Carolan R, Crawley MJ, Clement J-C, Lavorel Set al., 2016, Linkages between extracellular enzyme activities and the carbon and nitrogen content of grassland soils, SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, Vol: 96, Pages: 198-206, ISSN: 0038-0717

Journal article

Regan CE, Pilkington JG, Pemberton JM, Crawley MJet al., 2016, Sex differences in relationships between habitat use and reproductive performance in Soay sheep (Ovis aries), ECOLOGY LETTERS, Vol: 19, Pages: 171-179, ISSN: 1461-023X

Journal article

Tredennick AT, Adler PB, Grace JB, Harpole WS, Borer ET, Seabloom EW, Anderson TM, Bakker JD, Biederman LA, Brown CS, Buckley YM, Chu C, Collins SL, Crawley MJ, Fay PA, Firn J, Gruner DS, Hagenah N, Hautier Y, Hector A, Hillebrand H, Kirkman K, Knops JMH, Laungani R, Lind EM, MacDougall AS, McCulley RL, Mitchell CE, Moore JL, Morgan JW, Orrock JL, Peri PL, Prober SM, Risch AC, Schuetz M, Speziale KL, Standish RJ, Sullivan LL, Wardle GM, Williams RJ, Yang LHet al., 2016, Comment on "Worldwide evidence of a unimodal relationship between productivity and plant species richness", SCIENCE, Vol: 351, ISSN: 0036-8075

Journal article

Grace JB, Anderson TM, Seabloom EW, Borer ET, Adler PB, Harpole WS, Hautier Y, Hillebrand H, Lind EM, Paertel M, Bakker JD, Buckley YM, Crawley MJ, Damschen EI, Davies KF, Fay PA, Firn J, Gruner DS, Hector A, Knops JMH, MacDougall AS, Melbourne BA, Morgan JW, Orrock JL, Prober SM, Smith MDet al., 2016, Integrative modelling reveals mechanisms linking productivity and plant species richness, NATURE, Vol: 529, Pages: 390-+, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Storkey J, Macdonald AJ, Poulton PR, Scott T, Koehler IH, Schnyder H, Goulding KWT, Crawley MJet al., 2015, Grassland biodiversity bounces back from long-term nitrogen addition, NATURE, Vol: 528, Pages: 401-+, ISSN: 0028-0836

Journal article

Cenini VL, Fornara DA, McMullan G, Ternan N, Lajtha K, Crawley MJet al., 2015, Chronic nitrogen fertilization and carbon sequestration in grassland soils: evidence of a microbial enzyme link, Biogeochemistry, Vol: 126, Pages: 301-313, ISSN: 1573-515X

Chronic nitrogen (N) fertilization can greatly affect soil carbon (C) sequestration by altering biochemical interactions between plant detritus and soil microbes. In lignin-rich forest soils, chronic N additions tend to increase soil C content partly by decreasing the activity of lignin-degrading enzymes. In cellulose-rich grassland soils it is not clear whether cellulose-degrading enzymes are also inhibited by N additions and what consequences this might have on changes in soil C content. Here we address whether chronic N fertilization has affected (1) the C content of light versus heavier soil fractions, and (2) the activity of four extracellular enzymes including the C-acquiring enzyme β-1,4-glucosidase (BG; necessary for cellulose hydrolysis). We found that 19 years of chronic N-only addition to permanent grassland have significantly increased soil C sequestration in heavy but not in light soil density fractions, and this C accrual was associated with a significant increase (and not decrease) of BG activity. Chronic N fertilization may increase BG activity because greater N availability reduces root C:N ratios thus increasing microbial demand for C, which is met by C inputs from enhanced root C pools in N-only fertilized soils. However, BG activity and total root mass strongly decreased in high pH soils under the application of lime (i.e. CaCO3), which reduced the ability of these organo-mineral soils to gain more C per units of N added. Our study is the first to show a potential ‘enzyme link’ between (1) long-term additions of inorganic N to grassland soils, and (2) the greater C content of organo-mineral soil fractions. Our new hypothesis is that the ‘enzyme link’ occurs because (a) BG activity is stimulated by increased microbial C demand relative to N under chronic fertilization, and (b) increased BG activity causes more C from roots and from microbial metabolites to accumulate and stabilize into organo-mineral C fractions. We su

Journal article

Seabloom EW, Borer ET, Buckley YM, Cleland EE, Davies KF, Firn J, Harpole WS, Hautier Y, Lind EM, MacDougall AS, Orrock JL, Prober SM, Adler PB, Anderson TM, Bakker JD, Biederman LA, Blumenthal DM, Brown CS, Brudvig LA, Cadotte M, Chu C, Cottingham KL, Crawley MJ, Damschen EI, Dantonio CM, DeCrappeo NM, Du G, Fay PA, Frater P, Gruner DS, Hagenah N, Hector A, Hillebrand H, Hofmockel KS, Humphries HC, Jin VL, Kay A, Kirkman KP, Klein JA, Knops JMH, La Pierre KJ, Ladwig L, Lambrinos JG, Li Q, Li W, Marushia R, McCulley RL, Melbourne BA, Mitchell CE, Moore JL, Morgan J, Mortensen B, O'Halloran LR, Pyke DA, Risch AC, Sankaran M, Schuetz M, Simonsen A, Smith MD, Stevens CJ, Sullivan L, Wolkovich E, Wragg PD, Wright J, Yang Let al., 2015, Plant species' origin predicts dominance and response to nutrient enrichment and herbivores in global grasslands, NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2041-1723

Journal article

Moore O, Crawley MJ, 2015, Red deer impacts on the montane Racomitrium lanuginosum moss-heath community in north-west Scotland, PLANT ECOLOGY & DIVERSITY, Vol: 8, Pages: 427-436, ISSN: 1755-0874

Journal article

Moore O, Crawley MJ, 2015, The impact of red deer on liverwort-rich oceanic heath vegetation, PLANT ECOLOGY & DIVERSITY, Vol: 8, Pages: 437-447, ISSN: 1755-0874

Journal article

Orrock JL, Borer ET, Brudvig LA, Firn J, MacDougall AS, Melbourne BA, Yang LH, Baker DV, Bar-Massada A, Crawley MJ, Damschen EI, Davies KF, Gruner DS, Kay AD, Lind E, McCulley RL, Seabloom EWet al., 2015, A continent-wide study reveals clear relationships between regional abiotic conditions and post-dispersal seed predation, JOURNAL OF BIOGEOGRAPHY, Vol: 42, Pages: 662-670, ISSN: 0305-0270

Journal article

Macdonald CA, Crawley MJ, Wright DJ, Kuczynski J, Robinson L, Knight R, Abu Al-Soud W, Sorensen SJ, Deng Y, Zhou J, Singh BKet al., 2015, Identifying qualitative effects of different grazing types on below-ground communities and function in a long-term field experiment, ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 17, Pages: 841-854, ISSN: 1462-2912

Journal article

Moore O, Standen L, Crawley MJ, 2015, The impact of red deer management on liverworts associated with the mixed hepatic mat community and other terrestrial cryptogams, PLANT ECOLOGY & DIVERSITY, Vol: 8, Pages: 139-145, ISSN: 1755-0874

Journal article

Moore O, Crawley MJ, 2015, The impact of red deer management on cryptogam ecology in vegetation typical of north west Scotland, PLANT ECOLOGY & DIVERSITY, Vol: 8, Pages: 127-137, ISSN: 1755-0874

Journal article

Milcu A, Bonkowski M, Collins CM, Crawley MJet al., 2015, Aphid honeydew-induced changes in soil biota can cascade up to tree crown architecture, PEDOBIOLOGIA, Vol: 58, Pages: 119-127, ISSN: 0031-4056

Journal article

Pearse WD, Chase MW, Crawley MJ, Dolphin K, Fay MF, Joseph JA, Powney G, Preston CD, Rapacciuolo G, Roy DB, otherset al., 2015, Beyond the EDGE with EDAM: Prioritising British Plant Species According to Evolutionary Distinctiveness, and Accuracy and Magnitude of Decline., PloS one, Vol: 10, Pages: e0126524-e0126524

Journal article

Crawley MJ, 2015, Alien Plants, Publisher: Wolliam Collins

Book

Moore O, Crawley MJ, 2014, Effects of red deer exclusion on the corticolous and terricolous cryptogam community of Atlantic woodland, FORESTRY, Vol: 87, Pages: 618-628, ISSN: 0015-752X

Journal article

Lim J, Crawley MJ, De Vere N, Rich T, Savolainen Vet al., 2014, A phylogenetic analysis of the British flora sheds light on the evolutionary and ecological factors driving plant invasions, ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 4, Pages: 4258-4269, ISSN: 2045-7758

Journal article

Asyraf M, Crawley MJ, 2014, Effect of defoliation treatment on Mimosa pigra L. seedling survivability and resilience, WETLANDS ECOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT, Vol: 22, Pages: 419-426, ISSN: 0923-4861

Journal article

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