Imperial College London

DrMatthewHodes

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Honorary Senior Lecturer in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
 
 
 
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Contact

 

m.hodes Website

 
 
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Location

 

Commonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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119 results found

Cunning C, Hodes M, 2021, The COVID-19 pandemic and obsessive-compulsive disorder in young people: Systematic review., Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Pages: 13591045211028169-13591045211028169, ISSN: 1359-1045

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted the world since the first cases were reported in China in January 2020. The secondary mental health impacts of the pandemic are thought to be significant. Obsessive-compulsive disorder is a condition defined by recurrent obsessions and compulsions. It has been hypothesised that the focus on hygiene and contamination during the pandemic could exacerbate obsessive-compulsive symptoms in young people. METHOD: A systematic literature review was conducted. Papers were sought looking at the effect of the pandemic on obsessive-compulsive disorder in young people. RESULTS: Six published cross-sectional and longitudinal studies were identified, of which four studies investigated clinic samples with a diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder and two looked at community adolescent populations. Five out of the six studies found that obsessive-compulsive symptoms were exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic appears to be associated with a worsening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in young people. Being in treatment seems to have a protective effect. Maintaining mental health services during a pandemic is vital. It is important to be aware of the implications of pandemic on obsessive-compulsive symptoms in young people in order to allow them to access appropriate treatments. More research is needed in this area.

Journal article

Henein A, Pascual-Sanchez A, Corciova S, Hodes Met al., 2021, Obsessive compulsive disorder in treatment seeking children & adolescents during the COVID-19 pandemic, Publisher: CAMBRIDGE UNIV PRESS, Pages: S30-S30, ISSN: 2056-4724

Conference paper

Hodes M, Gau SS-F, de Vries PJ, 2020, Introduction, Starting at the Beginning Laying the Foundation for Lifelong Mental Health, Editors: Hodes, Gau, de Vries, Publisher: Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128197493

This book examines the determinates of individual differences in children and young people, along with the origins of maladjustment and psychiatric disorders.

Book chapter

Hodes M, Gau SS-F, Vries PJD, 2020, Starting at the Beginning Laying the Foundation for Lifelong Mental Health, Publisher: Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128197493

This book examines the determinates of individual differences in children and young people, along with the origins of maladjustment and psychiatric disorders.

Book

Hodes M, Hussain N, 2020, The role of family functioning in refugee child and adolescent mental health, Working with Refugee Families Trauma and Exile in Family Relationships, Editors: De Haene, Rousseau, Publisher: Cambridge University Press, Pages: 17-35, ISBN: 9781108429030

This important new book explores how to support refugee family relationships in promoting post-trauma recovery and adaptation in exile.

Book chapter

Durà-Vilà G, Hodes M, 2020, Cultural and religious variation in attitudes to young people consenting to health interventions, Journal of Religion and Health, Vol: 59, Pages: 870-890, ISSN: 0022-4197

There is a limited amount of empirical data available regarding the cultural and religious variation in perceptions about the age when young people should be regarded as competent to make decisions in health settings. A public survey of 400 adults from diverse religious and ethnic backgrounds was conducted in the UK and Spain. Attitudes were assessed using case vignettes. It was found that high religious practice was associated with recommending a higher age of consent for medical interventions. White British adults were more likely than Spanish adults to agree that younger adolescents should be allowed to consent to medical interventions. The study suggests that there is social, cultural and religious variation in adults' attitudes regarding the age when youngsters should consent to health interventions.

Journal article

Ngo T, Hodes M, 2020, Pervasive refusal syndrome in asylum-seeking children: review of the current evidence, Clinical Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol: 25, Pages: 227-241, ISSN: 1359-1045

This study reviews the current evidence in pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) in asylum-seeking children. Refugees can experience a variety of traumas throughout the process of migration. Children can be exposed to multiple traumas such as experienced or witnessed physical or sexual violence, loss and bereavement, parental separation and the threat of persecution and/or kidnapping. The third stage of the migration journey can add further stress; children and families may experience multiple rejections of asylum application effectively living in limbo with the constant threat of deportation. High rates of mental health disorder are well documented in young asylum seekers, particularly depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PRS is less frequently described but nonetheless a severe and life-threatening condition affecting young asylum seekers. Traumatisation, cultural factors and hostile asylum processes are specific moderating factors seen in asylum-seeking children. Asylum-seeking children normally make a full recovery from PRS. This study suggests a link between prolonged asylum processes and hostile foreign policy in developing and maintaining illness; similar cases are now being reported in other countries with hostile foreign policies. These findings are therefore relevant to clinicians and politicians working with this vulnerable group.

Journal article

Gledhill J, Hodes M, 2019, Engaging NHS staff in research: training is key., BMJ, Vol: 366, Pages: l5040-l5040

Journal article

Hodes M, Vostanis P, 2019, Practitioner review: Mental health problems of refugee children and adolescents and their management, Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, Vol: 60, Pages: 716-731, ISSN: 0021-9630

BACKGROUND: Since 2010, the numbers of refugees have increased and around half are under 18 years of age. It is known that experience of organised violence, displacement and resettlement increases the risk for psychiatric disorders and psychosocial impairment. This review integrates recent research into the risk and protective factors for psychopathology with service and treatment issues. METHODS: We draw on and critically evaluate key systematic reviews in the selected areas, innovative robust studies and relevant government reports. RESULTS: Many refugee children show resilience and function well, even in the face of substantial adversities. The most robust findings for psychopathology are that PTSD, and posttraumatic and depressive symptoms are found at higher prevalence in those who have been exposed to war experiences. Their severity may decrease over time with resettlement, but PTSD in the most exposed may show higher continuity. More severe psychiatric disorders including psychosis may also occur. Service delivery needs to take into account socioeconomic and cultural influences but, given the high level of unmet need even in high-income countries, stepped care delivery is required. The evaluation of psychological interventions, often delivered in group settings, suggests that they can be effective for many distressed children; however, for the more impaired, a greater range of disorder-specific therapies will be required. CONCLUSIONS: Child and adolescent mental health clinicians and service providers need to be aware of the specific needs of this population and systems for service delivery. There are significant knowledge gaps in understanding risk and vulnerability, service delivery and treatment effectiveness.

Journal article

Vickers B, Boyle RJ, Umasunthar T, Smith JG, Hodes Met al., 2019, Therapy competence in delivering a brief cognitive behavioural therapy intervention to reduce maternal anxiety associated with child food allergy., J Child Health Care, Pages: 1367493519853436-1367493519853436

Child food allergy is increasingly prevalent, and caring for such children is associated with elevated parental anxiety. We previously carried out a randomized-controlled trial (RCT) of brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for parental anxiety associated with child food allergy which found that treatment to be effective. This study describes the manualized brief CBT intervention and assesses the acquisition of competence in delivering this therapy. Three healthcare professionals were trained and supervised in the delivery of brief CBT to 98 mothers of food-allergic children. Competency was assessed using the Revised Cognitive Therapy Scale (CTS-R), with 'competency' defined as a CTS-R score ≥3. All therapists' CTS-R scores increased over time. In the first four months, the mean (SD) CTS-R score was 2.31 (0.56), increasing to 3.14 (0.41) in the second four months ( p < .001). Overall, 13/19 (68%) of CBT sessions were rated with a CTS-R score ≥3 in the second four months. After eight months, all therapists were performing CBT at a competent level (17 of the 18 sessions or 94%). The therapists participated in a RCT that reduced maternal anxiety (reported elsewhere). We have shown that therapists not previously trained in CBT can be trained in specific interventions and reach competent levels quickly.

Journal article

Hodes M, 2019, New developments in the mental health of refugee children and adolescents, Evidence-Based Mental Health, Vol: 22, Pages: 72-76, ISSN: 1362-0347

The increase in refugees globally since 2010 and the arrival of many into Europe since 2015, around 50% of whom are under 18 years, have been the stimulus to greater investigation and publications regarding their mental health. This clinical review summarises selected themes in the field as described in the published literature since 2016. The themes include refugee statistics, premigration and postmigration experiences, psychopathology focusing on parent-child relationships, unaccompanied refugee minors and associations between resettlement, acculturation and mental health. Some important reviews and studies are discussed that address service and treatment provision. While there has been a recent increase in research in this field, more is needed into the course of psychopathology, protective factors and the promotion of integration into resettlement countries, as well as models of service delivery and treatment effectiveness.

Journal article

Mitra R, Hodes M, 2019, Prevention of psychological distress and promotion of resilience amongst unaccompanied refugee minors in resettlement countries, Child: Care, Health and Development, Vol: 45, Pages: 198-215, ISSN: 0305-1862

AIM: As increasing numbers of unaccompanied refugee minors (URMs) are arriving in Europe, there is a need to investigate which factors promote psychological resilience and improve their mental health. This review aims to identify preventive post settlement influences, including living arrangements, access to mental health services, and effective treatments that may improve mental health outcomes. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted of published papers in any language for children (<18 years) entering a host country, unaccompanied and seeking asylum. Specific studies were eligible if they examined any treatment or nontreatment influences on mental health or psychological resilience for the URM. Thirteen published quantitative studies were identified. RESULTS: URMs in more supportive living arrangements including foster care had lower risk of PTSD and lower depressive symptoms compared with those in semi-independent care arrangements. URMs living in reception settings that restricted freedom had more anxiety symptoms. Regarding help seeking, one study found only 30% of URMs had foster parents or guardians who could detect a mental health need. Two papers found the URMs had low levels of contact with mental health services despite the high prevalence of psychiatric symptoms. URMs were less likely than accompanied children to receive trauma-focused interventions, cognitive therapy, or even practical assistance with basic social needs. With regard to treatment evaluation, only case series were identified. Three studies found cognitive behavioural therapy improved PTSD symptoms and mental health outcomes. A less structured approach (mental health counselling alone) did not improve functional health outcomes. CONCLUSION: Higher support living arrangements with low restrictions are associated with lower psychological distress. Most URMs are not receiving psychological interventions, and there is a dearth of studies evaluating treatment effectivenes

Journal article

Kramer T, Hodes M, 2019, The mental health of british afro-caribbean children and adolescents, Main Issues in Mental Health and Race, Pages: 175-200, ISBN: 9781138713833

This chapter considers social adjustment and psychiatric disorders amongst Afro-Caribbean children and adolescents in the UK. The British Isles have received waves of immigrants, including non-White immigrants for hundreds of years. By the latter part of the eighteenth century there were 30,000 Black people in Britain. However the Second World War created a demand for men for the British armed forces and war industries. Many aspects of family organisation in the Caribbean have been outlined elsewhere. Changes in family life are likely to take place due to migration. During the early years families will have experienced the stress of separationif parents came to the UK ahead of their children. Children themselves may have experienced migration. Nevertheless, Afro-Caribbean family organisation within the UK shows both similarities and differences with that of White British families. The Afro-Caribbean community in the UK has faced economic hardship, adversity and racial discrimination, apparent in patterns of employment and housing.

Book chapter

Hodes M, Gau SS, Vries PD, 2018, Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Publisher: Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128153109

Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health examines the determinates of individual differences in children and young people, along with the origins of maladjustment and psychiatric disorders.

Book

Hodes M, Gau SS-F, de Vries P, 2018, Introduction, Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Editors: Hodes, Gau, de Vries, Publisher: Academic Press, Pages: xv-xix, ISBN: 9780128153109

Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health examines the determinates of individual differences in children and young people, along with the origins of maladjustment and psychiatric disorders.

Book chapter

Harper G, Dominguez M, Mayordomo-Aranda A, Hodes Met al., 2018, Sexuality and gender identity in child and adolescent mental health: some reflections on social, psychiatric, and mental health service changes., Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health, Editors: Hodes, Gau, De Vries, Publisher: Academic Press, Pages: 223-236, ISBN: 9780128153109

Understanding Uniqueness and Diversity in Child and Adolescent Mental Health examines the determinates of individual differences in children and young people, along with the origins of maladjustment and psychiatric disorders.

Book chapter

Given-Wilson Z, Hodes M, Herlihy J, 2018, A review of adolescent autobiographical memory and the implications for assessment of unaccompanied minors' refugee determinations, CLINICAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 23, Pages: 209-222, ISSN: 1359-1045

Journal article

Hodes M, Anagnostopoulos D, Skokauskas N, 2018, Challenges and opportunities in refugee mental health: clinical, service, and research considerations, European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol: 27, Pages: 385-388, ISSN: 1018-8827

Journal article

Hodes M, Vasquez MM, Anagnostopoulos D, Triantafyllou K, Abdelhady D, Weiss K, Koposov R, Cuhadaroglu F, Hebebrand J, Skokauskas Net al., 2018, Refugees in Europe: national overviews from key countries with a special focus on child and adolescent mental health, European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol: 27, Pages: 389-399, ISSN: 1018-8827

Many European countries are becoming multicultural at a previously unseen rate. The number of immigrants including refugees has considerably increased since 2008, and especially after the beginning of the war in Syria. In 2015, 88,300 unaccompanied minors sought asylum in the Member States of the European Union (EU) and most came from Syria, Afghanistan, Iran, Iraq, Somalia and Eritrea. As a reaction to increased immigration, governments in many countries including Germany, Sweden and Norway implemented more restrictive immigration policy. A requirement for all countries, however, is the protection and welfare provision for all arriving children, regardless of their nationality, ensured by international and national legal frameworks. This paper provides an overview of the post 2015 immigration crisis in key European countries with a special focus on current demographics, refugee children, mental health studies, policies and practical support available for refugees.

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Umasunthar T, Smith JG, Hanna H, Procktor A, Phillips K, Pinto C, Gore C, Cox HE, Warner JO, Vickers B, Hodes Met al., 2017, A brief psychological intervention for mothers of children with food allergy can change risk perception and reduce anxiety: Outcomes of a randomized controlled trial, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 47, Pages: 1309-1317, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Gledhill J, Hodes M, 2017, Depression and Suicidal Behaviour, Child Psychology and Psychiatry Frameworks for Clinical Training and Practice, Editors: Skuse, Bruce, Dowdney, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Pages: 235-243, ISBN: 9781119170228

Comprehensive in its coverage of child emotional and behavioural development, emphasising evidence-based interventions, this book is valuable learning tool for all those training in clinical or educational psychology, social work, ...

Book chapter

Dura-Vila G, Hodes M, 2017, Socio-cultural variation in attitudes to adolescents' decision-making, MENTAL HEALTH RELIGION & CULTURE, Vol: 20, Pages: 954-972, ISSN: 1367-4676

Journal article

Given-Wilson Z, Herlihy J, Hodes M, 2016, Telling the story: a psychological review on assessing adolescents' asylum claims, Canadian Psychology-Psychologie Canadienne, Vol: 57, Pages: 265-273, ISSN: 0708-5591

Unaccompanied asylum seeking children (UASC) are separated from caregivers, have often been exposed to significant additional past and ongoing adversities, and seek protection from war, organized violence, or persecution in a new country. Obtaining a more secure legal position by achieving recognition of the asylum claim and legal rights may involve arduous interviews with officials who appear disbelieving. Assessing a minor’s claim to asylum is an important and difficult task. UASC often arrive with little “proof” or documentation to justify their claims and can only provide their account in making their claim. Without such proof, decision makers turn to the subjective judgment of the applicant’s credibility. This review appraises the literature on UASC asylum claims from a psychological perspective. Searches were made of the main databases for relevant studies. The review focuses on key findings: developmental processes, mental health, autobiographical memory, cultural influences, and decision makers’ own thinking processes and subjective states. Key findings specific to the UASC predicament are their ability to tell their story—an aspect of autobiographical memory, which is affected by developmental stage, presence of mental illness, and culture. The review shows that the decision makers’ own beliefs, past experiences, and emotional state also affects their decision-making processes. An adequate assessment requires evaluation of a multitude of factors and careful decision making. The findings are pertinent for understanding the UASC, interviewing style, and appraising the information. The implications for policy and practice are summarized.

Journal article

Hodes M, Gau S, 2016, Introduction, Positive Mental Health, Fighting Stigma and Promoting Resiliency for Children and Adolescents Fighting Stigma and Promoting Resiliency, Editors: Hodes, Gau, Publisher: Academic Press, Pages: xiii-xviii, ISBN: 9780128043943

In addition, the book promotes the study, treatment, care, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders and disabilities involving children, adolescents, and their families, and includes emerging knowledge on mental health problems and ...

Book chapter

Falissard B, Garralda E, MacMaster E, Peskin M, Szatmari P, Kirmayer L, Zheng Y, Kutcher S, McGorry P, Hawes D, Chapman M, Derenne I, Yurtbasi Met al., 2016, Positive Mental Health, Fighting Stigma and Promoting Resiliency for Children and Adolescents Fighting Stigma and Promoting Resiliency, Publisher: Academic Press, ISBN: 9780128043943

The book promotes the study, treatment, and prevention of mental and emotional disorders and disabilities involving children, adolescents, and their families, and includes emerging knowledge and good practice in the child and adolescent mental health field.

Book

Sturrock S, Hodes M, 2016, Child labour in low- and middle-income countries and its consequences for mental health: a systematic literature review of epidemiologic studies, European Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol: 25, Pages: 1273-1286, ISSN: 1435-165X

In low- and middle-income countries, large numbers of children are involved in work. Whilst studies have shown that child labour may be harmful to children's physical health, little is known about child labour's effects on mental health. It is important to understand the relationship between work and mental health problems during childhood, and identify possible risk factors for poorer mental health. A systematic literature review was conducted. Published papers in any language that compared the mental health of children (<18 years) who had been exposed to work with those who had not been exposed to work were included. Twelve published observational studies on the association between child labour and general psychopathology, internalising and externalising problems were identified. Child labour was found to be strongly associated with poor mental health outcomes in seven studies. More significant associations were found between child labour and internalising problems than externalising problems. The burden of poor mental health as a result of child labour is significant given the numbers of children in work. Risk factors for poorer mental health were involvement in domestic labour, younger age, and greater intensity of work, which could be due to the potential of child labour to cause isolation, low self-esteem, and perception of an external locus of control. The risk factors suggested by this review will have implications for policy makers. Additional research is needed in low-income countries, risk factors and also into the potential psychological benefits of low levels of work.

Journal article

Umasunthar T, Leonardi-Bee J, Turner PJ, Hodes M, Gore C, Warner JO, Boyle RJet al., 2015, Incidence of food anaphylaxis in people with food allergy: a systematic review and meta-analysis., Clinical & Experimental Allergy, Vol: 45, Pages: 1621-1636, ISSN: 1365-2222

BACKGROUND: Food allergy is a common cause of anaphylaxis, but the incidence of anaphylaxis in food allergic people is unknown. METHODS: We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis, using the inverse variance method. Two authors selected studies by consensus, independently extracted data and assessed study quality using the Newcastle-Ottawa assessment scale. We searched Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Web of Science, LILACS and AMED between January 1946 and September 2012, and recent conference abstracts. We included registries, databases or cohort studies which described the number of food anaphylaxis cases in a defined population and time period, and applied an assumed population prevalence of food allergy. RESULTS: We included data from 34 studies. There was high heterogeneity between study results, possibly due to variation in study populations, anaphylaxis definition and data collection methods. In food allergic people, medically-coded food anaphylaxis had an incidence rate of 0.14 per 100 person years (95% CI 0.05, 0.35; range 0.01, 1.28). In sensitivity analysis using different estimated food allergy prevalence, the incidence varied from 0.11 to 0.21 per 100 person years. At age 0-19 the incidence rate for anaphylaxis in food allergic people was 0.20 (95%CI 0.09, 0.43; range 0.01, 2.55; sensitivity analysis 0.08, 0.39). At age 0-4 an incidence rate of up to 7.00 per 100 person years has been reported. In food allergic people, hospital admission due to food anaphylaxis had an incidence rate of 0.09 (95% CI 0.01, 0.67; range 0.02, 0.81) per 1000 person years; 0.20 (95% CI 0.10, 0.43; range 0.04, 2.25) at age 0-19 and 0.50 (0.26, 0.93; range 0.08, 2.82) at age 0-4. CONCLUSION: In food allergic people, the incidence of food allergic reactions which are coded as anaphylaxis by healthcare systems is low at all ages, but appears to be highest in young children. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Journal article

Umasunthar T, Procktor A, Hodes M, Smith JG, Gore C, Cox HE, Marrs T, Hanna H, Phillips K, Pinto C, Turner PJ, Warner JO, Boyle RJet al., 2015, Patients' ability to treat anaphylaxis using adrenaline autoinjectors: a randomized controlled trial, ALLERGY, Vol: 70, Pages: 855-863, ISSN: 0105-4538

Journal article

Miltsiou E, Hodes M, Sohani M, Dominguez Met al., 2015, Trichotillomania in infants

Poster

Hodes M, Gledhill J, 2015, The research review in higher specialist child and adolescent psychiatry training

Poster

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