Imperial College London

ProfessorMikeLaffan

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Immunology and Inflammation

Visiting Professor
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3313 2178m.laffan

 
 
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Assistant

 

Mrs Lisa Pape +44 (0)20 3313 1320

 
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Location

 

5S5bHammersmith HospitalHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

348 results found

Arachchillage DJ, Rajakaruna I, Makris M, Laffan M, CA-COVID-19 Investigatorset al., 2024, Heparin-induced Thrombocytopenia with Thrombosis in COVID-19 versus Vaccine-induced Immune Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis in the United Kingdom., Semin Thromb Hemost

Journal article

Morrow GB, Flannery S, Charles PD, Heilig R, Feller T, McQuilten Z, Wake E, Ariens RAS, Winearls J, Mutch NJ, Fischer R, Laffan MA, Curry Net al., 2024, A novel method to quantify fibrin-fibrin and fibrin-α2-antiplasmin cross-links in thrombi formed from human trauma patient plasma., J Thromb Haemost

BACKGROUND: The widespread use of the antifibrinolytic agent, tranexamic acid (TXA), interferes with the quantification of fibrinolysis by dynamic laboratory assays such as clot lysis, making it difficult to measure fibrinolysis in many trauma patients. At the final stage of coagulation, factor (F)XIIIa catalyzes the formation of fibrin-fibrin and fibrin-α2-antiplasmin (α2AP) cross-links, which increases clot mechanical strength and resistance to fibrinolysis. OBJECTIVES: Here, we developed a method to quantify fibrin-fibrin and fibrin-α2AP cross-links that avoids the challenges posed by TXA in determining fibrinolytic resistance in conventional assays. METHODS: Fibrinogen alpha (FGA) chain (FGA-FGA), fibrinogen gamma (FGG) chain (FGG-FGG), and FGA-α2AP cross-links were quantified using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and parallel reaction monitoring in paired plasma samples from trauma patients prefibrinogen and postfibrinogen replacement. Differences in the abundance of cross-links in trauma patients receiving cryoprecipitate (cryo) or fibrinogen concentrate (Fg-C) were analyzed. RESULTS: The abundance of cross-links was significantly increased in trauma patients postcryo, but not Fg-C transfusion (P < .0001). The abundance of cross-links was positively correlated with the toughness of individual fibrin fibers, the peak thrombin concentration, and FXIII antigen (P < .05). CONCLUSION: We have developed a novel method that allows us to quantify fibrin cross-links in trauma patients who have received TXA, providing an indirect measure of fibrinolytic resistance. Using this novel approach, we have avoided the effect of TXA and shown that cryo increases fibrin-fibrin and fibrin-α2AP cross-linking when compared with Fg-C, highlighting the importance of FXIII in clot formation and stability in trauma patients.

Journal article

Laffan M, McLaughlin P, Motwani J, Alamelu J, Austin S, Classey S, Dolan G, Eales M, Gooding R, Grainger J, Harrison C, Jones A, Kelly AM, Oyesiku L, Rodgers R, Stephensen D, Talks K, Sonecha S, Danquah Aet al., 2024, Expert United Kingdom consensus on the preservation of joint health in people with moderate and severe haemophilia A: A modified Delphi panel., Haemophilia, Vol: 30, Pages: 306-319

AIM: For people with haemophilia A (PwHA), bleeding in the joints leads to joint damage and haemophilia-related arthropathy, impacting range of motion and life expectancy. Existing guidelines for managing haemophilia A support healthcare professionals (HCPs) and PwHA in their efforts to preserve joint health. However, such guidance should be reviewed, considering emerging evidence and consensus as presented in this manuscript. METHODS: Fifteen HCPs experienced in the management of PwHA in the UK participated in a three-round Delphi panel. Consensus was defined at ≥70% of panellists agreeing or disagreeing for Likert-scale questions, and ≥70% selecting the same option for multiple- or single-choice questions. Questions not reaching consensus were revised for the next round. RESULTS: 26.8% (11/41), 44.8% (13/29) and 93.3% (14/15) of statements reached consensus in Rounds 1, 2 and 3, respectively. HCPs agreed that prophylaxis should be offered to patients with a baseline factor VIII (FVIII) level of ≤5 IU/dL and that, where there is no treatment burden, the aim of prophylaxis should be to achieve a trough FVIII level ≥15 IU/dL and maintain a longer period with FVIII levels of ≥20-30 IU/dL to provide better bleed protection. The aspirational goal for PwHA is to prevent all joint bleeds, which may be achieved by maintaining normalised (50-150 IU/dL) FVIII levels. CONCLUSION: The panel of experts were largely aligned on approaches to preserving joint health in PwHA, and this consensus may help guide HCPs.

Journal article

Symington E, Rangarajan S, Lester W, Madan B, Pierce GF, Raheja P, Robinson TM, Osmond D, Russell CB, Vettermann C, Agarwal SK, Li M, Wong WY, Laffan Met al., 2024, Long-term safety and efficacy outcomes of valoctocogene roxaparvovec gene transfer up to 6 years post-treatment., Haemophilia, Vol: 30, Pages: 320-330

INTRODUCTION: Valoctocogene roxaparvovec uses an adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5) vector to transfer a factor VIII (FVIII) coding sequence to individuals with severe haemophilia A, providing bleeding protection. AIM: To assess safety and efficacy of valoctocogene roxaparvovec 5-6 years post-treatment. METHODS: In a phase 1/2 trial, adult male participants with severe haemophilia A (FVIII ≤1 IU/dL) without FVIII inhibitors or anti-AAV5 antibodies received valoctocogene roxaparvovec and were followed for 6 (6 × 1013 vg/kg; n = 7) and 5 (4 × 1013 vg/kg; n = 6) years. Safety, including investigation of potential associations between a malignancy and gene therapy, and efficacy are reported. RESULTS: No new treatment-related safety signals emerged. During year 6, a participant in the 6 × 1013  vg/kg cohort was diagnosed with grade 2 parotid gland acinar cell carcinoma; definitive treatment was uncomplicated parotidectomy with lymph node dissection. Target enrichment sequencing of tumour and adjacent healthy tissue revealed low vector integration (8.25 × 10-5 per diploid cell). Integrations were not elevated in tumour samples, no insertions appeared to drive tumorigenesis, and no clonal expansion of integration-containing cells occurred. During all follow-ups, >90% decreases from baseline in annualised treated bleeds and FVIII infusion rates were maintained. At the end of years 6 and 5, mean FVIII activity (chromogenic assay) was 9.8 IU/dL (median, 5.6 IU/dL) and 7.6 IU/dL (median, 7.1 IU/dL) for the 6 × 1013 and 4 × 1013 vg/kg cohorts, respectively, representing proportionally smaller year-over-year declines than earlier timepoints. CONCLUSIONS: Valoctocogene roxaparvovec safety and efficacy profiles remain largely unchanged; genomic investigations showed no association with a parotid tumour.

Journal article

Arachchillage DJ, Thachil J, Anderson JAM, Baker P, Poles A, Kitchen S, Laffan M, BSH Committeeet al., 2024, Diagnosis and management of heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: Third edition., Br J Haematol, Vol: 204, Pages: 459-475

Journal article

Mitchell JL, Khan D, Rana RH, Kriek N, Unsworth AJ, Sage T, Bye AP, Laffan M, Shapiro S, Thakurta A, Grech H, Ramasamy K, Gibbins JMet al., 2023, Multiple myeloma and its treatment contribute to increased platelet reactivity, PLATELETS, Vol: 34, ISSN: 0953-7104

Journal article

Arachchillage DJ, Weatherill A, Rajakaruna I, Gaspar M, Odho Z, Isgro G, Cagova L, Fleming L, Ledot S, Laffan M, Szydlo R, Jooste R, Scott I, Vuylsteke A, Yusuff Het al., 2023, Thrombosis, major bleeding, and survival in COVID-19 supported by VV- ECMO in the first vs second wave- multicentre observational study in the UK, Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Vol: 21, Pages: 2735-2746, ISSN: 1538-7836

BACKGROUND: Bleeding and thrombosis are major complications of veno-venous extracorporeal membrane (VV-ECMO). OBJECTIVES: To assess thrombosis, major bleeding (MB) and 180-day in patients supported by VV-ECMO between first (1st March-31st May 2020) and second (1st June 2020-30th June 2021) waves of the COVID-19 pandemic. PATIENTS/METHODS: Observational study of 309 consecutive patients (≥18years) with severe COVID-19 supported by VV-ECMO in four nationally commissioned ECMO centres, UK. RESULTS: Median age was 48 (19-75)years and 70.6% were male. Probabilities of survival, thrombosis, and MB at 180 days in the overall cohort were 62.5% (193/309), 39.8%(123/309) and 30%(93/309). In multivariate analysis, age >55 years (HR 2.29 [1.33-3.93],p=0.003) and elevated creatinine (HR 1.91 [1.19-3.08],p=0.008) were associated with increased mortality. Corrected for duration of VV-ECMO support, arterial thrombosis alone (HR 3.0 [95% CI1.5-5.9], P= 0.002) or circuit thrombosis alone (HR 3.9 [95% 2.4-6.3], P<0.001), but not venous thrombosis, increased mortality. MB during ECMO had 3-fold risk (95% CI 2.6-5.8, P<0.001) of mortality. The first wave cohort had more males (76.7% vs 64%, p=0.014), higher 180-day survival (71.1% vs 53.3% p=0.003), more venous thrombosis alone (46.4% vs 29.2%, p=0.02) and lower circuit thrombosis (9.2% vs 28.1%, p<0.001). The second wave cohort received more steroids (121/150 [80.6%] vs 86/159 [54.1%], p<0.0001) and Tocilizumab (20/150 [13.3%] vs 4/159 [2.5%] p=0.005). CONCLUSIONS: MB and thrombosis are frequent complications in patients on VV-ECMO and significantly increase mortality. Arterial thrombosis alone or circuit thrombosis alone increased mortality whilst venous thrombosis alone had no effect. MB during ECMO support increased mortality 3.9-fold.

Journal article

Stefanucci L, Collins JH, Sims MC, Barrio-Hernandez I, Sun L, Burren O, Perfetto L, Bender I, Callahan TJ, Fleming K, Guerrero JA, Hermjakob H, Martin MJ, Stephenson JD, Paneerselvam K, Petrovski S, Porras P, Robinson PN, Wang Q, Watkins X, Frontini M, Laskowski RA, Beltrao P, Di Angelantonio E, Gomez K, Laffan M, Ouwehand WH, Mumford AD, Freson K, Carss KJ, Downes K, Gleadall NS, Megy K, Bruford E, Vuckovic Det al., 2023, The effects of pathogenic variants for inherited hemostasis disorders in 140,214 UK Biobank participants., Blood

Rare genetic diseases affect millions, and identifying causal DNA variants is essential for patient care. Therefore, it is imperative to estimate the effect of each independent variant and improve their pathogenicity classification. Our study of 140,214 unrelated UK Biobank (UKB) participants found each carries a median of 7 variants previously reported as pathogenic or likely pathogenic. We focused on 967 diagnostic-grade genes (DGGs) variants for rare bleeding, thrombotic, and platelet disorders (BTPDs) observed in 12,367 UKB participants. By association analysis, for a subset of these variants, we estimated effect sizes for platelet count and volume, and odds ratios for bleeding and thrombosis. Variants causal of some autosomal recessive platelet disorders revealed phenotypic consequences in carriers. Loss-of-function variants in MPL, which cause chronic amegakaryocytic thrombocytopenia if biallelic, were unexpectedly associated with increased platelet counts in carriers. We also demonstrated that common variants identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for platelet count or thrombosis risk may influence the penetrance of rare variants in BTPD DGGs on their associated hemostasis disorders. Network-propagation analysis applied to an interactome of 18,410 nodes and 571,917 edges showed that GWAS variants with large effect sizes are enriched in DGGs and their first-order interactors. Finally, we illustrate the modifying effect of polygenic scores for platelet count and thrombosis risk on disease severity in participants carrying rare variants in TUBB1, or PROC and PROS1, respectively. Our findings demonstrate the power of association analyses using large population datasets in improving pathogenicity classifications of rare variants.

Journal article

Simini G, Akor F, Szydlo R, Laffan M, Arachchillage DRJet al., 2023, Safety and Efficacy of Therapeutic Anticoagulation with Subcutaneous Unfractionated Heparin in Patients with Renal Failure, SEMINARS IN THROMBOSIS AND HEMOSTASIS, ISSN: 0094-6176

Journal article

Arachchillage DJ, Rajakaruna I, Odho Z, Makris M, Laffan M, CA-COVID19 Investigatorset al., 2023, Impact of thromboprophylaxis on hospital acquired thrombosis following discharge in patients admitted with COVID-19: multicentre observational study in the UK, British Journal of Haematology, Vol: 202, Pages: 485-497, ISSN: 0007-1048

Post-discharge thromboprophylaxis in patients admitted with COVID-19 remains controversial. We aimed to determine the impact of thromboprophylaxis on hospital acquired thrombosis (HAT) in patients (≥18 years) discharged following admission for COVID-19 in an observational study across 26 NHS Trusts in the UK (01.04.2020-31.12.2021). Overall, 8895 patients were included to the study: 971 patients were discharged with thromboprophylaxis and propensity score matched (PSM) with a desired ratio of 1:1, from patients discharged without thromboprophylaxis. Patients with heparin induced thrombocytopenia, major bleeding during admission and pregnant women were excluded. As expected from 1:1 PSM, no difference was observed in parameters between the two groups, including duration of hospital stay, except the thromboprophylaxis group had a significantly higher proportion who had received therapeutic dose anticoagulation during admission. There were no differences in the laboratory parameters especially D-dimers between the two groups at admission or discharge. Median duration of thromboprophylaxis following discharge from hospital was 4 weeks (1-8 weeks). No difference was found in HAT in patients discharged with TP versus no TP (1.3% vs. 0.92%, p = 0.52). Increasing age and smoking significantly increased the risk of HAT. Many patients in both cohorts had raised D-dimer at discharge but D-dimer was not associated with increased risk of HAT.

Journal article

Mobayen G, Smith K, Ediriwickrema K, Starke RD, Solomonidis EG, Laffan MA, Randi AM, McKinnon TAJet al., 2023, von Willebrand factor binds to angiopoietin-2 within endothelial cells and after release from Weibel-Palade bodies, Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis, Vol: 21, Pages: 1802-1812, ISSN: 1538-7836

BACKGROUND: The von Willebrand factor (VWF) is a multimeric plasma glycoprotein essential for hemostasis, inflammation, and angiogenesis. The majority of VWF is synthesized by endothelial cells (ECs) and stored in Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB). Among the range of proteins shown to co-localize to WPB is angiopoietin-2 (Angpt-2), a ligand of the receptor tyrosine kinase Tie-2. We have previously shown that VWF itself regulates angiogenesis, raising the hypothesis that some of the angiogenic activity of VWF may be mediated by its interaction with Angpt-2. METHODS: Static-binding assays were used to probe the interaction between Angpt-2 and VWF. Binding in media from cultured human umbilical vein ECs s and in plasma was determined by immunoprecipitation experiments. Immunofluorescence was used to detect the presence of Angpt-2 on VWF strings, and flow assays were used to investigate the effect on VWF function. RESULTS: Static-binding assays revealed that Angpt-2 bound to VWF with high affinity (KD,app ∼3 nM) in a pH and calcium-dependent manner. The interaction was localized to the VWF A1 domain. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated that the complex persisted following stimulated secretion from ECs and was present in plasma. Angpt-2 was also visible on VWF strings on stimulated ECs. The VWF-Angpt-2 complex did not inhibit the binding of Angpt-2 to Tie-2 and did not significantly interfere with VWF-platelet capture. CONCLUSIONS: Together, these data demonstrate a direct binding interaction between Angpt-2 and VWF that persists after secretion. VWF may act to localize Angpt-2; further work is required to establish the functional consequences of this interaction.

Journal article

Noble H, Crossette-Thambiah C, Odho Z, Karawitage N, Logan K, Pericleous C, Laffan M, Arachchillage DJet al., 2023, Frequency and Clinical Significance Anti-PS/PT Antibodies in Patients with Antiphospholipid Syndrome - Single Centre Observational Study in the United Kingdom, SEMINARS IN THROMBOSIS AND HEMOSTASIS, Vol: 49, Pages: 553-557, ISSN: 0094-6176

Journal article

Bradbury CA, Lawler PR, McVerry BJ, Zarychanski R, REMAP CAPIet al., 2023, Continuation of therapeutic dose heparin for critically ill patients with COVID-19, INTENSIVE CARE MEDICINE, Vol: 49, Pages: 873-875, ISSN: 0342-4642

Journal article

Simini G, Vinayagam S, Karawitage N, Mobayen G, Krishnamoorthi A, Innes AJ, Laffan M, Arachchillage DJet al., 2023, Thrombocytosis and acquired bleeding disorders in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms, 63rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the British-Society-for-Haematology, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 53-54, ISSN: 0007-1048

Conference paper

Robbins AJ, Che Bakri NA, Toke-Bjolgerud E, Edwards A, Vikraman A, Michalsky C, Fossler M, Lemm N-M, Medhipour S, Budd W, Gravani A, Hurley L, Kapil V, Jackson A, Lonsdale D, Latham V, Laffan M, Chapman N, Cooper N, Szydlo R, Boyle J, Pollock KM, Owen Det al., 2023, The effect of TRV027 on coagulation in COVID 19: A pilot randomized, placebo-controlled controlled trial, British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol: 89, Pages: 1495-1501, ISSN: 0306-5251

COVID-19 causes significant thrombosis and coagulopathy, with elevated D-dimer a predictor of adverse outcome. The precise mechanism of this coagulopathy remains unclear, one hypothesis is that loss of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme 2 activity during viral endocytosis leads to pro-inflammatory angiotensin II accumulation, loss of angiotensin-1-7 and subsequent vascular endothelial activation. We undertook a double blind randomised, placebo controlled experimental medicine study to assess the effect of TRV027, a synthetic angiotensin-1-7 analogue on D-dimer in 30 patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19 (REC ref. 20/HRA/3414), Clinical Trial No. NCT04419610.The study showed a similar rate of adverse events in TRV027 and control groups. There was a numerical decrease in D-dimer in the TRV027 group and increase in D-dimer in the placebo group, however, this did not reach statistical significance (p=0.15). A Bayesian analysis demonstrated there was a 92% probability that this change represented a true drug effect.

Journal article

Arachchillage DJ, Rajakaruna I, Laffan M, Szydlo R, Odho Z, Scott I, Ledot S, Vuylsteke A, Yusuff Het al., 2023, Outcomes in COVID-19 supported by ECMO in the first vs second wave -multicentre observational study, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 25-25, ISSN: 0007-1048

Conference paper

Laffan M, Benson G, Farrelly C, Gomez K, Jones A, Maclean R, O'Donnell J, Lavin Met al., 2023, An expert consensus to define how higher standards of equitable care for von Willebrand disease can be achieved in the UK and Republic of Ireland, HAEMOPHILIA, ISSN: 1351-8216

Journal article

Burke T, Rodriguez-Santana I, Chowdary P, Curtis R, Khair K, Laffan M, Mclaughlin P, Noone D, O'Mahony B, Pasi J, Skinner M, O'Hara Jet al., 2023, Humanistic burden of problem joints for children and adults with haemophilia, HAEMOPHILIA, Vol: 29, Pages: 608-618, ISSN: 1351-8216

Journal article

Mahlangu J, Kaczmarek R, von Drygalski A, Shapiro S, Chou S-C, Ozelo MC, Kenet G, Peyvandi F, Wang M, Madan B, Key NS, Laffan M, Dunn AL, Mason J, Quon DV, Symington E, Leavitt AD, Oldenburg J, Chambost H, Reding MT, Jayaram K, Yu H, Mahajan R, Chavele K-M, Reddy DB, Henshaw J, Robinson TM, Wong WY, Pipe SWet al., 2023, Two-Year Outcomes of Valoctocogene Roxaparvovec Therapy for Hemophilia A, NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE, Vol: 388, Pages: 694-705, ISSN: 0028-4793

Journal article

Curry NS, Davenport R, Wong H, Gaarder C, Johansson P, Juffermans NP, Maegele M, Stensballe J, Brohi K, Laffan M, Stanworth SJet al., 2023, Traumatic coagulopathy in the older patient: analysis of coagulation profiles from the Activation of Coagulation and Inflammation in Trauma-2 (ACIT-2) observational, multicenter study, JOURNAL OF THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, Vol: 21, Pages: 215-226, ISSN: 1538-7933

Journal article

Laffan M, Dass N, Willock R, Sanigorska A, Jones C, Brighton S, Howitt Het al., 2023, RECOMBINANT VON WILLEBRAND FACTOR TREATMENT OUTCOMES IN ADULTS WITH VON WILLEBRAND DISEASE IN THE UK: AN INTERIM ANALYSIS, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 147-148, ISSN: 1351-8216

Conference paper

Arachchillage DJ, Laffan M, Pericleous C, 2023, Hydroxychloroquine as an Immunomodulatory and Antithrombotic Treatment in Antiphospholipid Syndrome, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, Vol: 24

Journal article

Jayakody Arachchillage D, Rajakaruna I, Pericleous C, Nicolson PLR, Makris M, Laffan M, the CA-COVID-19 Study Groupet al., 2022, Autoimmune disease and COVID-19- a multicentre observational study in the United Kingdom, Rheumatology, Vol: 61, Pages: 4643-4655, ISSN: 1462-0324

ObjectiveTo establish the demographic characteristics, laboratory findings and clinical outcomes in patients with autoimmune disease (AD) in comparison to a propensity matched cohort of patients without AD admitted with COVID-19 to hospitals in the UK.MethodsThis is a multicentre observational study across 26 NHS Trusts. Data were collected both retrospectively and prospectively using a pre-designed standardised case record form. Adult patients (≥18 years) admitted between 1st of April 2020 and 31 July 2020 were included.ResultsOverall, 6288 patients were included to the study. Of these, 394 patients had AD prior to admission with COVID-19. Of 394 patients, 80 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis or antiphospholipid syndrome were classified as severe rheumatologic AD. A higher proportion of those with AD had anaemia: 240(60.91%) vs 206(52.28%), p= 0.015, raised LDH 150(38.08%) vs 43(10.92%), p< 0.001 and raised creatinine 122(30.96%) vs 86(21.83%), p= 0.01 respectively. A significantly higher proportion of patients with severe rheumatologic AD had raised CRP : 77(96.25%) vs 70(87.5%), p= 0.044 and LDH 20(25%) vs 6(7.5%), p= 0.021. Patients with severe rheumatologic AD had significantly higher mortality [32/80(40%)] compared with propensity matched cohort of patients without AD [20/80(25%)], p= 0.043. However, there was no difference in 180-day mortality between propensity matched cohorts of patients with or without AD in general, p= 0.47.ConclusionsPatients with severe rheumatologic AD had significantly higher mortality. Anaemia, renal impairment and raised LDH were more frequent in patients with any AD whilst raised CRP and LDH were more frequent in patients with severe rheumatologic AD both of which have been shown to associate with increased mortality in patients with COVID-19.

Journal article

Crossette-Thambiah C, Rajakaruna I, Odho Z, Doyle A, Breen K, Laffan M, Arachchillage DJet al., 2022, Anticoagulation Practice, Recurrent Thrombosis, and Major Bleeding in Antiphospholipid Syndrome- a Multicentre Observational Study in the United Kingdom, 64th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology (ASH), Publisher: AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, ISSN: 0006-4971

Conference paper

Hart ACJ, Cabrera AM, Vladescu C, Mustafa S, Syzdlo R, Saputil RC, Tan MMH, Malik A, Sharp D, Vicente P, Busza A, Laffan M, Gontsarova A, Waldman A, Cooper Net al., 2022, Do Children with Immune Thrombocytopenia Have Cerebral Microbleeds?, 64th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology (ASH), Publisher: AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, ISSN: 0006-4971

Conference paper

Prince RE, Schaeper U, Aretz J, Li B, Caro MDR, Vrotniakaite-Bajerciene K, Eisermann M, Dames S, Loffner K, Martinez A, Laffan M, Ahnstrom J, Angelillo-Scherrer Aet al., 2022, SLN140 a Small Interfering RNA Targeting Protein S Improves Hemostasis Potency in Hemophilia, 64th Annual Meeting and Exposition of the American-Society-of-Hematology (ASH), Publisher: AMER SOC HEMATOLOGY, Pages: 1670-1671, ISSN: 0006-4971

Conference paper

Eladnani RP, Schaeper U, Aretz J, Vrotniakaite-Bajerciene K, Caro MR, Dames S, Eisermann M, Loffner K, Martinez A, Laffan M, Ahnstrom J, Angelillo-Scherrer Aet al., 2022, A GalNAc conjugated Small Interfering RNA Targeting Protein S Improves Hemostasis Potency in Hemophilia, Publisher: E M H SWISS MEDICAL PUBLISHERS LTD, Pages: 2S-2S, ISSN: 1424-7860

Conference paper

Arachchillage DJ, Crossette-Thambiah C, Asmar N, Ramji S, Laffan Met al., 2022, Cerebral vein thrombosis after ChAdOx1 nCov-19 vaccination: Long-term outcome of four patients, RESEARCH AND PRACTICE IN THROMBOSIS AND HAEMOSTASIS, Vol: 6

Journal article

Morrow GB, Feller T, McQuilten Z, Wake E, Ariens RAS, Winearls J, Mutch NJ, Laffan MA, Curry Net al., 2022, Cryoprecipitate transfusion in trauma patients attenuates hyperfibrinolysis and restores normal clot structure and stability: Results from a laboratory sub-study of the FEISTY trial, CRITICAL CARE, Vol: 26, ISSN: 1364-8535

Journal article

Bekono-Nessah I, Rosenburg A, Bowles CT, Riesgo-Gil F, Stock U, Szydlo RR, Laffan M, Arachchillage DJet al., 2022, Bleeding and thrombotic complications and their impact on mortality in patients supported with left ventricular assist device for cardiogenic shock, PERFUSION-UK, ISSN: 0267-6591

Journal article

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