Imperial College London

Professor Michael Loebinger

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Professor of Practice (Respiratory Medicine)
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7351 8337m.loebinger

 
 
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Location

 

Fulham RoadRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

257 results found

Polverino E, De Soyza A, Dimakou K, Traversi L, Bossios A, Crichton ML, Ringshausen FC, Vendrell M, Burgel P-R, Haworth CS, Loebinger MR, Lorent N, Pink I, McDonnell M, Skrgat S, Carro LM, Sibila O, van der Eerden M, Kauppi P, Shoemark A, Amorim A, Brown JS, Hurst JR, Miravitlles M, Menendez R, Torres A, Welte T, Blasi F, Altenburg J, Shteinberg M, Boersma W, Elborn SJ, Goeminne PC, Aliberti S, Chalmers JDet al., 2024, The Association Between Bronchiectasis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: Data from the European Bronchiectasis Registry (EMBARC)., Am J Respir Crit Care Med

RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: Bronchiectasis and COPD are associated conditions but misdiagnosis is believed to be common. A recently published international consensus definition of bronchiectasis (BE) and COPD association: The ROSE criteria (radiological bronchiectasis(R), obstruction: FEV1/FVC ratio<0.7 (O), symptoms (S) and exposure:≥10 pack year smoking (E) allows objective diagnosis of the BE-COPD association. METHODS: Analysis of the EMBARC registry, a prospective observational study of patients with CT confirmed bronchiectasis from 28 countries. The ROSE criteria were used to objectively defined BE-COPD association. Key outcomes during up to 5-years follow-up were exacerbations, hospitalization and mortality. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: 16730 patients with bronchiectasis were included. 4336 had a co-diagnosis of COPD and these patients had more exacerbations, worse quality of life and higher severity scores. We observed marked overdiagnosis of COPD using the ROSE criteria: 22.2% of patients with a diagnosis of COPD did not have airflow obstruction and 31.9% did not have a history of ≥10 pack years smoking. Therefore the proportion meeting the ROSE criteria for COPD was 2157 (55.4%). Compared to patients without COPD, patients meeting ROSE criteria had increased risk of exacerbations and exacerbations resulting in hospitalisation during follow-up (IRR 1.25 95%CI 1.15-1.35 and 1.69 95%CI 1.51-1.90 respectively) but patients with a diagnosis of COPD who did not meet ROSE criteria also had increased risk of exacerbations. CONCLUSIONS: The label of COPD is often applied to bronchiectasis patients without objective evidence of airflow obstruction and smoking history. Patients with a clinical label of COPD have worse clinical outcomes.

Journal article

Aliberti S, Blasi F, Burgel P-R, Calcagno A, Fløe A, Grogono D, Papavasileiou A, Polverino E, Prados C, Rohde G, Salzer HJF, Sánchez-Montalvá A, Shteinberg M, Van Braeckel E, van Ingen J, Veziris N, Wagner D, Loebinger MRet al., 2024, Mycobacterium avium complex pulmonary disease patients with limited treatment options., ERJ Open Res, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2312-0541

How to identify MAC-PD patients with limited treatment options: an expert consensus https://bit.ly/3QwLQ8T.

Journal article

Ringshausen FC, Shapiro AJ, Nielsen KG, Mazurek H, Pifferi M, Donn KH, van der Eerden MM, Loebinger MR, Zariwala MA, Leigh MW, Knowles MR, Ferkol TW, CLEAN-PCD investigators and study teamet al., 2024, Safety and efficacy of the epithelial sodium channel blocker idrevloride in people with primary ciliary dyskinesia (CLEAN-PCD): a multinational, phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial., Lancet Respir Med, Vol: 12, Pages: 21-33

BACKGROUND: Mucociliary clearance is dysfunctional in people with primary ciliary dyskinesia, resulting in the accumulation of dehydrated mucus in the airways that is difficult to clear. We undertook a study to assess the benefit on lung function of treatment with a nebulised epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) blocker, idrevloride, with or without hypertonic saline, in people with primary ciliary dyskinesia. METHODS: The CLEAN-PCD trial was a phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial conducted at 32 tertiary adult and paediatric care centres and university hospitals in Canada, Denmark, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, the UK, and the USA. People with a confirmed diagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia, aged 12 years or older, with a percentage of predicted FEV1 (ppFEV1) in the range of 40% to <90%, were randomly assigned in a 2:2:1:1 ratio (block size=6), stratified by ppFEV1 at screening, to one of four sequences: (1) idrevloride in hypertonic saline in treatment period 1 then hypertonic saline in treatment period 2; (2) hypertonic saline in treatment period 1 then idrevloride in hypertonic saline in treatment period 2; (3) idrevloride in treatment period 1 then placebo in treatment period 2; and (4) placebo in treatment period 1 then idrevloride in treatment period 2. The idrevloride dose was 85 μg and hypertonic saline was 4·2% NaCl. 3 mL of each study treatment was nebulised twice daily for 28 days in treatment periods 1 and 2; the two 28-day treatment periods were separated by a 28-day washout period. The primary endpoint was absolute change from baseline in ppFEV1 after 28 days. Safety assessments and reports of adverse events were made at clinic visits during each treatment period and by a follow-up telephone call 28 days after the last dose of study drug. Additionally, adverse events could be reported at a follow-up telephone call 3 days after the start of dosing and as they arose. Participants who received at l

Journal article

Kos R, Goutaki M, Kobbernagel HE, Rubbo B, Shoemark A, Aliberti S, Altenburg J, Anagnostopoulou P, Athanazio RA, Beydon N, Dell SD, Emiralioglu N, Ferkol TW, Loebinger MR, Lorent N, Maître B, Marthin J, Morgan LC, Nielsen KG, Ringshausen FC, Shteinberg M, Tiddens HAWM, Maitland-Van der Zee AH, Chalmers JD, Lucas JSA, Haarman EGet al., 2024, A BEAT-PCD consensus statement: a core outcome set for pulmonary disease interventions in primary ciliary dyskinesia., ERJ Open Res, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2312-0541

BACKGROUND: Consistent use of reliable and clinically appropriate outcome measures is a priority for clinical trials, with clear definitions to allow comparability. We aimed to develop a core outcome set (COS) for pulmonary disease interventions in primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD). METHODS: A multidisciplinary international PCD expert panel was set up. A list of outcomes was created based on published literature. Using a modified three-round e-Delphi technique, the panel was asked to decide on relevant end-points related to pulmonary disease interventions and how they should be reported. First, inclusion of an outcome in the COS was determined. Second, the minimum information that should be reported per outcome. The third round finalised statements. Consensus was defined as ≥80% agreement among experts. RESULTS: During the first round, experts reached consensus on four out of 24 outcomes to be included in the COS. Five additional outcomes were discussed in subsequent rounds for their use in different subsettings. Consensus on standardised methods of reporting for the COS was reached. Spirometry, health-related quality-of-life scores, microbiology and exacerbations were included in the final COS. CONCLUSION: This expert consensus resulted in a COS for clinical trials on pulmonary health among people with PCD.

Journal article

Thomson RM, Loebinger MR, Burke AJ, Morgan LC, Waterer GW, Ganslandt Cet al., 2023, OPTIMA: An Open-Label, Non-comparative Pilot Trial of Inhaled Molgramostim in Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection., Ann Am Thorac Soc

RATIONALE: Inhaled granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been proposed as a potential immunomodulatory treatment for nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection. OBJECTIVES: This open label, non-comparative pilot trial investigated the efficacy and safety of inhaled GM-CSF (molgramostim nebulizer solution) in patients with predominantly treatment-refractory pulmonary NTM (M. avium complex (MAC), M. abscessus (MABS)) infection, either in combination with ongoing guideline-based therapy (GBT), or as monotherapy in patients who had stopped GBT due to lack of efficacy or intolerability. METHODS: 32 adult patients with refractory NTM (MAC 24, MABS 8) were recruited into two cohorts: with (16) or without (16) ongoing GBT. Nebulised molgramostim 300 μg/day was administered over 48 weeks. Sputum cultures and smears, and clinical assessments (6-Minute Walk Test, symptom scores, Quality of Life Questionnaire - Bronchiectasis, and body weight) were collected 4-weekly during treatment, and 12 weeks after end of treatment. The primary endpoint was sputum culture conversion, defined as 3 consecutive monthly negative cultures during the treatment period. RESULTS: Eight patients (25%) achieved culture conversion on treatment (7 (29.2%) MAC patients, 1 (12.5%) MABS patient); in 4 patients this was durable after end of treatment. Of the 24 MAC patients, an additional four patients had a partial response, converting from smear positive at baseline to smear negative at the end of treatment, and time-to-positivity in liquid culture media increased. Two of these patients sustained negative cultures from the end of treatment. Other clinical endpoints were unchanged. Serious adverse events were mainly pulmonary exacerbations or worsening NTM infection. Three deaths, not treatment-related, were reported. CONCLUSION: In this population of patients with severe NTM disease, molgramostim was safe and well tolerated. Sputum culture conversion rates for patients with M

Journal article

Kumar K, Loebinger MR, 2023, Concomitant or sequential pulmonary infection with non-tuberculous mycobacteria and Aspergillus., Int J Tuberc Lung Dis, Vol: 27, Pages: 797-802

Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) and Aspergillus are ubiquitous organisms that have the potential to cause significant pulmonary disease in certain clinical contexts. An association is known to exist between NTM and Aspergillus lung infections. However, it is unclear if NTM infection predisposes to Aspergillus infection or vice versa. It is also unclear whether treatment for one results in a favourable ecological niche that facilitates the growth of the other and promotes subsequent clinical disease. An improved understanding of the link between these two pulmonary pathogens is critical to guide improvements in clinical practice, and ultimately, enhance outcomes among patients who are at risk of experiencing these infections, either concomitantly or sequentially. Here, we discuss the association between pulmonary NTM and Aspergillus infections. We address the frequency with which coinfection or sequential infections are reported to occur, predisposing risk factors that have been identified and the impact on clinical outcomes. Current data on the mechanistic links between NTM and Aspergillus lung infections are also considered. The potential implications for routine clinical practice are explored.

Journal article

Loebinger MR, Quint JK, van der Laan R, Obradovic M, Chawla R, Kishore A, van Ingen Jet al., 2023, Response., Chest, Vol: 164, Pages: e156-e157

Journal article

Loebinger MR, Quint JK, van der Laan R, Obradovic M, Chawla R, Kishore A, van Ingen Jet al., 2023, Risk Factors for Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Pulmonary Disease: A Systematic Literature Review and Meta-Analysis., Chest, Vol: 164, Pages: 1115-1124

BACKGROUND: Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease (NTM-PD) is widely underdiagnosed, and certain patient groups, such as those with underlying respiratory diseases, are at increased risk of developing the disease. Understanding patients at risk is essential to allow for prompt testing and diagnosis and appropriate management to prevent disease progression. RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the risk factors for NTM-PD that should prompt a physician to consider NTM testing and diagnosis? STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Electronic searches of PubMed and EMBASE were conducted in July 2021 for the period 2011-2021. Inclusion criteria were studies of patients with NTM-PD with associated risk factors. Data were extracted and assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Data analysis was conducted using the R-based "meta" package. Only studies that reported association outcomes for cases with NTM-PD compared with control participants (healthy populations or participants without NTM-PD) were considered for the meta-analysis. RESULTS: Of the 9,530 searched publications, 99 met the criteria for the study. Of these, 24 formally reported an association between possible risk factors and the presence of NTM-PD against a control population and were included in the meta-analysis. Comorbid respiratory disease was associated with a significant increase in the OR for NTM-PD (bronchiectasis [OR, 21.43; 95% CI, 5.90-77.82], history of TB [OR, 12.69; 95% CI, 2.39-67.26], interstitial lung disease [OR, 6.39; 95% CI, 2.65-15.37], COPD [OR, 6.63; 95% CI, 4.57-9.63], and asthma [OR, 4.15; 95% CI, 2.81-6.14]). Other factors noted to be associated with an increased risk of NTM-PD were the use of inhaled corticosteroids (OR 4.46; 95% CI, 2.13-9.35), solid tumors (OR, 4.66; 95% CI, 1.04-20.94) and the presence of pneumonia (OR, 5.54; 95% CI, 2.72-11.26). INTERPRETATION: The greatest risk for NTM-PD is conferred by comorbid respiratory diseases such as

Journal article

Dedrick RM, Abad L, Storey N, Kaganovsky AM, Smith BE, Aull HA, Cristinziano M, Morkowska A, Murthy S, Loebinger MR, Hatfull GF, Satta Get al., 2023, The problem of Mycobacterium abscessus complex: multi-drug resistance, bacteriophage susceptibility and potential healthcare transmission., Clin Microbiol Infect, Vol: 29, Pages: 1335.e9-1335.e16

OBJECTIVES: Mycobacterium abscessus complex is responsible for 2.6-13.0% of all non-tuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary infections and these are notoriously difficult to treat due to the complex regimens required, drug resistance and adverse effects. Hence, bacteriophages have been considered in clinical practice as an additional treatment option. Here, we evaluated antibiotic and phage susceptibility profiles of M. abscessus clinical isolates. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) revealed the phylogenetic relationships, dominant circulating clones (DCCs), the likelihood of patient-to-patient transmission and the presence of prophages. METHODS: Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed using CLSI breakpoints (n = 95), and plaque assays were used for phage susceptibility testing (subset of n = 88, 35 rough and 53 smooth morphology). WGS was completed using the Illumina platform and analysed using Snippy/snp-dists and Discovery and Extraction of Phages Tool (DEPhT). RESULTS: Amikacin and Tigecycline were the most active drugs (with 2 strains resistant to amikacin, and one strain with Tigecycline MIC of 4 μg/mL). Most strains were resistant to all other drugs tested, with Linezolid and Imipenem showing the least resistance, at 38% (36/95) and 55% (52/95), respectively. Rough colony morphotype strains were more phage-susceptible than smooth strains (77%-27/35 versus 48%-25/53 in the plaque assays, but smooth strains are not killed efficiently by those phages in liquid infection assay). We have also identified 100 resident prophages, some of which were propagated lytically. DCC1 (20%-18/90) and DCC4 (22%-20/90) were observed to be the major clones and WGS identified 6 events of possible patient-to-patient transmission. DISCUSSION: Many strains of M. abscessus complex are intrinsically resistant to available antibiotics and bacteriophages represent an alternative therapeutic option, but only for strains with rough morphology. Further studie

Journal article

Chalmers JD, Polverino E, Crichton ML, Ringshausen FC, De Soyza A, Vendrell M, Burgel PR, Haworth CS, Loebinger MR, Dimakou K, Murris M, Wilson R, Hill AT, Menendez R, Torres A, Welte T, Blasi F, Altenburg J, Shteinberg M, Boersma W, Elborn JS, Goeminne PC, Aliberti Set al., 2023, Bronchiectasis in Europe: data on disease characteristics from the European Bronchiectasis registry (EMBARC), LANCET RESPIRATORY MEDICINE, Vol: 11, Pages: 637-649, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Chalmers JD, Aliberti S, Altenburg J, Blasi F, Clarke C, Chotirmall SH, Crichton ML, Dhar R, Goeminne P, Haworth C, Loebinger MR, Lorent N, Polverino E, Ringshausen FC, Shoemark A, Shteinberg M, Sibila O, Spinou A, Welte Tet al., 2023, Transforming clinical research and science in bronchiectasis: EMBARC3, a European Respiratory Society Clinical Research Collaboration, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 61, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Kumar K, Ish-Horowicz J, Cuthbertson L, Ellis HC, Churchward C, Loebinger MR, Moffatt MF, Cookson WOCet al., 2023, Characterising Pulmonary Microbial Communities in Mycobacterium Avium Complex Pulmonary Disease and Mycobacterium Abscessus Pulmonary Disease, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Metersky ML, Loebinger MR, Teper A, Fernandez C, Fucile S, Lauterio M, Van der Laan R, Maes A, Chalmers JDet al., 2023, Outcomes of Patients With Bronchiectasis by Disease Severity: Subgroup Analysis From the Brensocatib WILLOW Study, International Conference of the American-Thoracic-Society (ATS), Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Bradley JM, Ferguson K, Bailey A, O'Neill K, McLeese RH, Hill AT, Loebinger MR, Carroll M, Chalmers JD, Gatheral T, Johnson C, De Soyza A, Hurst JR, Downey DG, Elborn JSet al., 2023, Clinimetric Properties of Outcome Measures in Bronchiectasis, Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, Pages: 648-659, ISSN: 1546-3222

Conference paper

Loebinger MR, van der Laan R, Obradovic M, van Ingen Jet al., 2023, Global survey of physician testing practices for nontuberculous mycobacteria, ERJ OPEN RESEARCH, Vol: 9

Journal article

Tonder AJV, Ellis HC, Churchward CP, Kumar K, Ramadan N, Benson S, Parkhill J, Moffatt MF, Loebinger MR, Cookson WOCet al., 2023, <i>Mycobacterium</i><i> avium</i> complex genomics and transmission in a London hospital, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 61, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Ellis HC, Moffatt MF, Churchward C, Cuthbertson L, Cookson WOC, Loebinger MRet al., 2023, Molecular assessment of mycobacterial burden in the treatment of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease, ERJ OPEN RESEARCH, Vol: 9

Journal article

Davies J, Hughes D, Rosenthal M, Cuthbertson L, ramadan N, Felton I, Simmonds N, Loebinger M, price H, Armstrong-James D, elborn S, Cookson W, Moffatt Met al., 2023, An invisible threat? Aspergillus positive cultures and co-infecting bacteria in airway sample, Journal of Cystic Fibrosis, Vol: 22, Pages: 320-326, ISSN: 1569-1993

BackgroundAspergillus fumigatus (Af) infection is associated with poor lung health in chronic suppurative lung diseases but often goes undetected. We hypothesised that inhibition of Af growth by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa) increases the frequency of false-negative Af culture in co-infected people. Using a substantial group of cystic fibrosis (CF) airway samples, we assessed the relationship between Af and bacterial pathogens, additionally comparing fungal culture with next-generation sequencing.MethodsFrequency of co-culture was assessed for 44,554 sputum/BAL cultures, from 1,367 CF patients between the years 2010–2020. In a subgroup, Internal Transcribed Spacer-2 (ITS2) fungal sequencing was used to determine sequencing-positive, culture-negative (S+/C-) rates.ResultsPa+ samples were nearly 40% less likely (P<0.0001) than Pa- samples to culture Af, an effect that was also seen with some other Gram-negative isolates. This impact varied with Pa density and appeared to be moderated by Staphylococcus aureus co-infection. Sequencing identified Af-S+/C- for 40.1% of tested sputa. Samples with Pa had higher rates of Af-S+/C- (49.3%) than those without (35.7%; RR 1.38 [1.02–1.93], P<0.05). Af-S+/C- rate was not changed by other common bacterial infections. Pa did not affect the S+/C- rates of Candida, Exophiala or Scedosporium.ConclusionsPa/ Af co-positive cultures are less common than expected in CF. Our findings suggest an Af-positive culture is less likely in the presence of Pa. Interpretation of negative cultures should be cautious, particularly in Pa-positive samples, and a companion molecular diagnostic could be useful. Further work investigating mechanisms, alternative detection techniques and other chronic suppurative lung diseases is needed.

Journal article

Dhar R, Singh S, Talwar D, Mohan BVM, Tripathi SK, Swarnakar R, Trivedi S, Rajagopala S, D'Souza G, Padmanabhan A, Archana B, Mahesh PA, Ghewade B, Nair G, Jindal A, Jayadevappa GDH, Sawhney H, Sarmah KR, Saha K, Anantharaj S, Khanna A, Gami S, Shah A, Shah A, Dutt N, Garg H, Vyas S, Venugopal K, Prasad R, Aleemuddin NM, Karmakar S, Singh V, Jindal SK, Sharma S, Prajapat D, Chandrashekar S, Loebinger M, Mishra A, Blasi F, Ramanathan RP, Goeminne PC, Vasudev P, Shoemark A, Jayaraj BS, Kungwani R, Das A, Sawhney M, Polverino E, Welte T, Gulecha NS, Shteinberg M, Mangala A, Shah P, Chauhan NK, Jajodia N, Singhal A, Batra S, Hasan A, Aliberti S, Crichton ML, Limaye S, Salvi S, Chalmers JDet al., 2023, Clinical outcomes of bronchiectasis in India: data from the EMBARC/Respiratory Research Network of India registry, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 61, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Shoemark A, Griffin H, Wheway G, Hogg C, Lucas JS, Genomics England Res Consortium GER, Camps C, Taylor J, Carroll M, Loebinger MR, Chalmers JD, Morris-Rosendahl D, Mitchison HM, De Soyza Aet al., 2022, Genome sequencing reveals underdiagnosis of primary ciliary dyskinesia in bronchiectasis, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 60, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Kumar K, Cuthbertson L, Ellis HC, Churchward C, Loebinger MR, Moffatt MF, Cookson WOCet al., 2022, THE LUNG MICROBIOME IN NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL PULMONARY DISEASE, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society (BTS), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A36-A36, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Loebinger MR, van der Laan R, Obradovic M, van Ingen Jet al., 2022, TESTING AT-RISK PATIENTS FOR NTM-PD IN CURRENT CLINICAL PRACTICE: RESULTS OF AN INTERNATIONAL SURVEY, Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society (BTS), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A83-A84, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Loebinger MR, Quint JK, van der Laan R, Obradovic M, Chawla R, Kishore A, van Ingen Jet al., 2022, A SYSTEMATIC LITERATURE REVIEW AND METAANALYSIS OF PATIENT RISK FACTORS FOR NONTUBERCULOUS MYCOBACTERIAL PULMONARY DISEASE (NTM-PD), Winter Meeting of the British-Thoracic-Society (BTS), Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A84-A85, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Halbeisen FS, Pedersen ESL, Goutaki M, Spycher BD, Amirav I, Boon M, Cohen-Cymberknoh M, Crowley S, Emiralioglu N, Haarman EG, Karadag B, Koerner-Rettberg C, Latzin P, Loebinger MR, Lucas JS, Mazurek H, Morgan L, Marthin J, Pohunek P, Santamaria F, Schwerk N, Thouvenin G, Yiallouros P, Nielsen KG, Kuehni CEet al., 2022, Lung function from school age to adulthood in primary ciliary dyskinesia, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 60, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Nwankwo L, Donovan J, Ni M, Loebinger M, Armstrong-James D, Shah Aet al., 2022, Evaluation of remote triazole capillary blood testing to facilitate remote therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM): A validation study, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: 257-259, ISSN: 1369-3786

Conference paper

Peake S, Jones A, Jose R, Shattock E, Loebinger MRet al., 2022, Do adults with Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD) have a positive experience of home spirometry?, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Lamb G, Stoll S, Jose R, Loebinger M, Shah A, Stowell Jet al., 2022, Assessment of a self-administered home intravenous antimicrobial therapy service for patients with chronic suppurative lung disease, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Chudasama A, Dickens F, Khan T, Dexter-Spooncer R, Shah A, Stowell J, Loebinger M, Manuel A, Iyer S, Polkey M, Jose Ret al., 2022, Initiating NIV in bronchiectasis - Is it a sign of poor life expectancy?, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Cheong J, Boreland S, Belkarty B, Jones A, Felton I, Ukor E, Stowell J, Jose R, Madge S, Wilkins J, Frost E, Premachandra P, Loebinger M, Drobniewski F, Simmonds N, Shah Aet al., 2022, Implementing tablet-based ototoxicity screening in adult respiratory patients, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Hill AT, Grillo L, Gruffydd-Jones K, Payne K, Souto M, Sullivan A, Wildgoose J, Loebinger MRet al., 2022, British Thoracic Society Quality Standard for Clinically Significant Bronchiectasis in Adults 2022, BMJ OPEN RESPIRATORY RESEARCH, Vol: 9

Journal article

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