Imperial College London

DrMargiePeden

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Senior Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

m.peden

 
 
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Location

 

Translation & Innovation Hub BuildingWhite City Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

73 results found

Ma T, Peden AE, Peden M, Hyder AA, Jagnoor J, Duan L, Brown J, Passmore J, Clapham K, Tian M, Rahman AKMF, Ivers RQet al., 2021, Out of the silos: embedding injury prevention into the Sustainable Development Goals, Injury Prevention, Vol: 27, Pages: 166-171, ISSN: 1353-8047

Globally, unintentional injuries contribute significantly to disability and death. Prevention efforts have traditionally focused on individual injury mechanisms and their specific risk factors, which has resulted in slow progress in reducing the burden. The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) represent a global agenda for promoting human prosperity while respecting planetary boundaries. While injury prevention is currently only recognised in the SDG agenda via two road safety targets, the relevance of the SDGs for injury prevention is much broader. In this State of the Art Review, we illustrate how unintentional injury prevention efforts can be advanced substantially within a broad range of SDG goals and advocate for the integration of safety considerations across all sectors and stakeholders. This review uncovers injury prevention opportunities within broader global priorities such as urbanisation, population shifts, water safeguarding and corporate social responsibility. We demonstrate the relevance of injury prevention efforts to the SDG agenda beyond the health goal (SDG 3) and the two specific road safety targets (SDG 3.6 and SDG 11.2), highlighting 13 additional SDGs of relevance. We argue that all involved in injury prevention are at a critical juncture where we can continue with the status quo and expect to see more of the same, or mobilise the global community in an 'Injury Prevention in All Policies' approach.

Journal article

Kakar IS, Peden M, Jagnoor J, 2021, Intersectionality based policy analysis: Equity in mobility in India, Transport Policy, Vol: 101, Pages: 14-22, ISSN: 0967-070X

Access to affordable, reliable, good quality transport is necessary for accessing socio-economic opportunities and resources. Transportation inequities have serious implications for public health, and thus transport policy becomes an important social determinant of health. This research studies how needs of vulnerable populations are constructed and addressed in transportation policies in India at the national and sub-national (Delhi) level. Thirty-four National and Delhi level policies were analysed using an intersectional lens to understand how policies identify and address mobility inequities faced by vulnerable groups. Intersectionality states that an understanding of individual experiences based on a single aspect of identity (such as class, gender, ability, age, etc.) is unrepresentative of individual needs. Adopting an intersectional lens for analysing policies allows for a deeper understanding of the impact of multi-level interacting social locations and structures of domination that shape human experience. Thus, helping in creating more effective policies to make transportation accessible to vulnerable groups. The research found that policies focussed on a unitary understanding of population groups and therefore did not capture the complexities of transportation inequities experienced by vulnerable groups. While equity was a stated concern, policies fell short of addressing structural factors and interlocking systems of power and oppression which give rise to inequities. Policy documents were also found to stigmatise groups based on disability and gender. The policy making process was found to be exclusionary and ‘expert’ driven. Voices of vulnerable groups and civil society were left out of the policy making process. In terms of evidence, policies did not detail what evidence was relied upon. All the above has negative implications for the operationalisation of equity and social justice. In order to advance a social justice agenda, an intersect

Journal article

Gupta M, Kakar IS, Peden M, Altieri E, Jagnoor Jet al., 2021, Media coverage and framing of road traffic safety in India, BMJ GLOBAL HEALTH, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2059-7908

Journal article

Bhaumik S, Hunter K, Matzopoulos R, Prinsloo M, Ivers RQ, Peden Met al., 2020, Facilitators and barriers to child restraint use in motor vehicles: a qualitative evidence synthesis, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 26, Pages: 478-493, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Gupta M, Bhaumik S, Roy S, Panda RK, Peden M, Jagnoor Jet al., 2020, Determining child drowning mortality in the Sundarbans, India: applying the community knowledge approach., Inj Prev

BACKGROUND: The Sundarbans in India is a rural, forested region where children are exposed to a high risk of drowning due to its waterlogged geography. Current data collection systems capture few drowning deaths in this region. METHODS: A community-based survey was conducted in the Sundarbans to determine the drowning mortality rate for children aged 1 to 4 years and 5 to 9 years. A community knowledge approach was used. Meetings were held with community residents and key informants to identify drowning deaths in the population. Identified deaths were verified by the child's household through a structured survey, inquiring on the circumstances around the drowning death. RESULTS: The drowning mortality rate for children aged 1 to 4 years was 243.8 per 100 000 children and for 5 to 9 years was 38.8 per 100 000 children. 58.0% of deaths were among children aged 1 to 2 years. No differences in rates between boys and girls were found. Most children drowned in ponds within 50 metres of their homes. Children were usually unaccompanied with their primary caretaker engaged in household work. A minority of children were treated by formal health providers. CONCLUSIONS: Drowning is a major cause of death among children in the Sundarbans, particularly those aged 1 to 4 years. Interventions keeping children in safe spaces away from water are urgently required. The results illustrate how routine data collection systems grossly underestimate drowning deaths, emphasising the importance of community-based surveys in capturing these deaths in rural low- and middle-income country contexts. The community knowledge approach provides a low-resource, validated methodology for this purpose.

Journal article

Jagnoor J, Prinja S, Ha N, Gabbe BJ, Peden M, Ivers RQet al., 2020, Mortality and health-related quality of life following injuries and associated factors: a cohort study in Chandigarh, North India, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 26, Pages: 315-323, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Hunter K, Bestman A, Dodd M, Prinsloo M, Mtambeka P, van As S, Peden MMet al., 2020, Overloaded and Unrestrained: A Qualitative Study with Local Experts Exploring Factors Affecting Child Car Restraint Use in Cape Town, South Africa, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH AND PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 17

Journal article

Peden M, 2020, Saving lives through vehicle safety., The Lancet Global Health, Vol: 8, Pages: e746-e747, ISSN: 2214-109X

Journal article

Curtis K, Brysiewicz P, Shaban RZ, Fry M, Considine J, Acevedo Gamboa FE, Holden M, Heyns T, Peden Met al., 2020, Nurses responding to the World Health Organization (WHO) priority for emergency care systems for universal health coverage, INTERNATIONAL EMERGENCY NURSING, Vol: 50, ISSN: 1755-599X

Journal article

Puvanachandra P, Janmohammed A, Mtambeka P, Prinsloo M, Van As S, Peden MMet al., 2020, Affordability and availability of child restraints in an under-served population in South Africa, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol: 17, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1660-4601

Background: Child road traffic injuries are a major global public health problem and the issue is particularly burdensome in middle-income countries such as South Africa where injury death rates are 41 per 100,000 for under 5′s and 24.5 per 100,000 for 5–14-year-old. Despite their known effectiveness in reducing injuries amongst children, the rates of use of child restraint systems (CRS) remains low in South Africa. Little is known about barriers to child restraint use especially in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: We carried out observation studies and parent/carer surveys in 7 suburbs of Cape Town over a three month period to assess usage rates and explore the knowledge and perceptions of parents towards child restraint legislation, ownership and cost; Results: Only 7.8% of child passengers were observed to be properly restrained in a CRS with driver seatbelt use and single child occupancy being associated with higher child restraint use. 92% of survey respondents claimed to have knowledge of current child restraint legislation, however, only 32% of those parents/carers were able to correctly identify the age requirements and penalty. Reasons given for not owning a child seat included high cost and the belief that seatbelts were a suitable alternative. Conclusions: These findings indicate the need for a tighter legislation with an increased fine paired with enhanced enforcement of both adult seatbelt and child restraint use. The provision of low-cost/subsidised CRS or borrowing schemes and targeted social marketing through online fora, well baby clinics, early learning centres would be beneficial in increasing ownership and use of CRS.

Journal article

Peden MM, Puvanachandra P, 2019, Looking back on 10 years of global road safety, International Health, Vol: 11, Pages: 327-330, ISSN: 1876-3405

Every year more than 1.35 million people lose their lives on the road and tens of millions more are injured, some permanently. Since the early 2000s there has been renewed focus on the issue, with the United Nations, World Health Organization and the World Bank placing the issue higher on their agendas. Guided by the United Nations General Assembly, World Health Assembly resolutions and ministerial-level conferences on the global road safety crisis, multisectoral partnerships have synthesised the evidence, advocated for action (there are two Sustainable Development Goal targets with an ambitious goal of reducing deaths and injuries from road traffic crashes by 50%), raised public awareness, generated funding, piloted interventions and monitored progress. And yet the total number of deaths has plateaued despite some sporadic country-level successes. More needs to be done—more people need to be trained in countries to deliver, monitor and evaluate a systems approach to road safety, more solid evidence of what works in low-resource settings is needed (including sustainable transportation options) and there needs to be a greater focus on optimising care and support for those injured in crashes—if we are to begin to see numbers come down in the next decade.

Journal article

Janmohammed A, Attwood P, Mtambeka P, Prinsloo M, Peden Met al., 2019, The need for stronger child restraint laws, SAMJ South African Medical Journal, Vol: 109, Pages: 545-545, ISSN: 0256-9574

Journal article

Clay C, Van As AB, Hunter K, Peden Met al., 2019, Latest results show urgent need to address child restraint use., SAMJ South African Medical Journal, Vol: 109, Pages: 66-66, ISSN: 0256-9574

Journal article

Peden MM, Khayesi M, 2018, Save LIVES technical package: 22 interventions that could make a difference, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 24, Pages: 381-383, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Borges G, Monteiro M, Cherpitel CJ, Orozco R, Ye Y, Poznyak V, Peden M, Pechansky F, Cremonte M, Reid SD, Mendez Jet al., 2017, Alcohol and Road Traffic Injuries in Latin America and the Caribbean: A Case-Crossover Study, ALCOHOLISM-CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, Vol: 41, Pages: 1731-1737, ISSN: 0145-6008

Journal article

Peden M, Di Pietro G, 2017, Saving lives by improving road safety, PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 144, Pages: S3-S4, ISSN: 0033-3506

Journal article

Hyder AA, Paichadze N, Toroyan T, Peden MMet al., 2017, Monitoring the Decade of Action for Global Road Safety 2011-2020: An update, GLOBAL PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 12, Pages: 1492-1505, ISSN: 1744-1692

Journal article

Hyder AA, Norton R, Perez-Nunez R, Mojarro-Iniguez FR, Peden M, Kobusingye Oet al., 2016, The Road Traffic Injuries Research Network: a decade of research capacity strengthening in low- and middle-income countries, Health Research Policy and Systems, Vol: 14, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 1478-4505

Road traffic crashes have been an increasing threat to the wellbeing of road users worldwide; an unacceptably high number of people die or become disabled from them. While high-income countries have successfully implemented effective interventions to help reduce the burden of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in their countries, low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have not yet achieved similar results. Both scientific research and capacity development have proven to be useful for preventing RTIs in high-income countries. In 1999, a group of leading researchers from different countries decided to join efforts to help promote research on RTIs and develop the capacity of professionals from LMICs. This translated into the creation of the Road Traffic Injuries Research Network (RTIRN) – a partnership of over 1,100 road safety professionals from 114 countries collaborating to facilitate reductions in the burden of RTIs in LMICs by identifying and promoting effective, evidenced-based interventions and supporting research capacity building in road safety research in LMICs. This article presents the work that RTIRN has done over more than a decade, including production of a dozen scientific papers, support of nearly 100 researchers, training of nearly 1,000 people and 35 scholarships granted to researchers from LMICs to attend world conferences, as well as lessons learnt and future challenges to maximize its work.

Journal article

Stoker P, Garfinkel-Castro A, Khayesi M, Odero W, Mwangi MN, Peden M, Ewing Ret al., 2015, Pedestrian Safety and the Built Environment: A Review of the Risk Factors, JOURNAL OF PLANNING LITERATURE, Vol: 30, Pages: 377-392, ISSN: 0885-4122

Journal article

Hyder AA, Tran NT, Bachani AM, Bishai D, Peden Met al., 2015, Child and adolescent injury prevention, Child and Adolescent Health Issues (A Tribute to the Pediatrician Donald E Greydanus), Pages: 167-181, ISBN: 9781634635745

More than 875,000 children die from preventable injuries annually. Developing effective interventions to prevent child and adolescent injuries remains a major challenge for the field. A number of intervention strategies such as the use of helmets, seat-belts, and pool fences, have been shown to be effective at preventing injury-related deaths in children. The objective of this study was to estimate the potential reductions in injury-related child mortality that can be achieved through the implementation of a select group of existing interventions. A review of the literature on intervention strategies applicable to childhood unintentional injuries was conducted. Data on intervention effectiveness were then extracted from the literature identified and applied to current estimates of injury-related child mortality. This study assumed equality of intervention effectiveness across world regions. 80 papers and reports were reviewed from which effectiveness data on twelve intervention strategies applicable to the prevention of injury among children were identified. If each of these twelve intervention strategies were implemented globally, the result may be the prevention of between 8,000 to 80,000 child deaths for each type of injury. While the urgent need to research and identify new intervention strategies for preventing injury deaths in children remains, this analysis has demonstrated that there might be tremendous benefits-up to 1,000 child lives a day, that may be realized through enhanced coverage of existing interventions which have already been tried and tested.

Book chapter

Dhaffala A, Longo-Mbenza B, Kingu JH, Peden M, Kafuko-Bwoye A, Clarke M, Mazwai ELet al., 2013, Demographic profile and epidemiology of injury in Mthatha, South Africa., Afr Health Sci, Vol: 13, Pages: 1144-1148

OBJECTIVE: To determine the magnitude, socio-demographic and epidemiological characteristics of injury at a Provincial referral hospital. METHODS: This review was conducted on all trauma patients admitted at the Mthatha Hospital Complex and Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital from the 1(st) January 1997 to the 31(st) December 2000. RESULTS: The incident rate of injuries was 3.2% (n=2460/75,833 total admissions). Injured patients were mostly black (80%) and males (ratio: 5 men: 1 woman). Only 8.1% of injured patients were transported to hospital by ambulances. The leading causes of injuries were inter-personal violence accounting for 60% of cases, and motor vehicle accidents accounting for 19%; of them 38% were due to poor visibility, over speeding, and fatigue. The overall mortality was 33% (n=821) independently predicted by poverty (OR=8.2 95%CI 6-11.1; P<0.0001) and age>40 years(OR=7.8 95%CI 7.7-12.1;P<0.0001). CONCLUSION: The burden of injury is a mass issue that warrants regional attention with quality of care and training.

Journal article

Ackaah W, Afukaar F, Agyemang W, Trinh TA, Hejar AR, Abdul G, Gururaj G, Elisa H-S, Martha H, Hyder AA, Inclan-Valadez C, Kulanthayan S, Norton R, Odero W, Owoaje ET, Peden M, Rajam K, Razzak JA, Sangowawa AO, Shah J, Pham LT, Umar RRS, Nguyen TVA, Van der Putten M, Vajanapoom N, Vichit-Vadakan N, Yellappan K, Yu Jet al., 2013, The use of non-standard motorcycle helmets in low- and middle-income countries: a multicentre study, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 19, Pages: 158-163, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Toroyan T, Khayesi M, Peden M, 2013, Time to prioritise safe walking, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF INJURY CONTROL AND SAFETY PROMOTION, Vol: 20, Pages: 197-202, ISSN: 1745-7300

Journal article

Peden M, Kobusingye O, Monono ME, 2013, Africa's roads - the deadliest in the world, SAMJ SOUTH AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 103, Pages: 228-+, ISSN: 0256-9574

Journal article

Toroyan T, Peden MM, Iaych K, 2013, WHO launches second global status report on road safety, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 19, Pages: 150-150, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Toroyan T, Peden M, Iaych K, Krug Eet al., 2013, More action needed to protect vulnerable road users, LANCET, Vol: 381, Pages: 977-979, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Ozanne-Smith J, Bartolomeos KK, Peden MM, 2012, WHO launches guide to fatal injury data collection, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 18, Pages: 421-421, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Peden MM, diPietro G, Hyder AA, 2012, Two years into the road safety in 10 countries project: how are countries doing?, INJURY PREVENTION, Vol: 18, Pages: 279-279, ISSN: 1353-8047

Journal article

Hyder AA, Allen KA, Di Pietro G, Adriazola CA, Sobel R, Larson K, Peden Met al., 2012, Addressing the Implementation Gap in Global Road Safety: Exploring Features of an Effective Response and Introducing a 10-Country Program, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol: 102, Pages: 1061-1067, ISSN: 0090-0036

Journal article

Chisholm D, Naci H, Ali A, Tran NT, Peden Met al., 2012, Cost effectiveness of strategies to combat road traffic injuries in sub-Saharan Africa and South East Asia: mathematical modelling study, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 344, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

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