Imperial College London

ProfessorMajidEzzati

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Chair in Global Environmental Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0767majid.ezzati Website

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Bennett:2018:10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30214-7,
author = {Bennett, J and Pearson-Stuttard, J and Kontis, V and Capewell, S and Wolfe, I and Ezzati, M},
doi = {10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30214-7},
journal = {The Lancet Public Health},
pages = {e586--e597},
title = {Contributions of diseases and injuries to widening life expectancy inequalities in England from 2001 to 2016: population-based analysis of vital registration data},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30214-7},
volume = {3},
year = {2018}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - BackgroundLife expectancy inequalities in England have increased steadily since the 1980s. Our aim was to investigate how much deaths from different diseases and injuries and at different ages have contributed to this rise to inform policies that aim to reduce health inequalities.MethodsWe used vital registration data from the Office for National Statistics on population and deaths in England, by underlying cause of death, from 2001 to 2016, stratified by sex, 5-year age group, and decile of the Index of Multiple Deprivation (based on the ranked scores of Lower Super Output Areas in England in 2015). We grouped the 7·65 million deaths by their assigned International Classification of Diseases (10th revision) codes to create categories of public health and clinical relevance. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to obtain robust estimates of cause-specific death rates by sex, age group, year, and deprivation decile. We calculated life expectancy at birth by decile of deprivation and year using life-table methods. We calculated the contributions of deaths from each disease and injury, in each 5-year age group, to the life expectancy gap between the most deprived and affluent deciles using Arriaga's method.FindingsThe life expectancy gap between the most affluent and most deprived deciles increased from 6·1 years (95% credible interval 5·9–6·2) in 2001 to 7·9 years (7·7–8·1) in 2016 in females and from 9·0 years (8·8–9·2) to 9·7 years (9·6–9·9) in males. Since 2011, the rise in female life expectancy has stalled in the third, fourth, and fifth most deprived deciles and has reversed in the two most deprived deciles, declining by 0·24 years (0·10–0·37) in the most deprived and 0·16 years (0·02–0·29) in the second-most deprived by 2016. Death rates from every disease and at every age were higher in depriv
AU - Bennett,J
AU - Pearson-Stuttard,J
AU - Kontis,V
AU - Capewell,S
AU - Wolfe,I
AU - Ezzati,M
DO - 10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30214-7
EP - 597
PY - 2018///
SN - 2468-2667
SP - 586
TI - Contributions of diseases and injuries to widening life expectancy inequalities in England from 2001 to 2016: population-based analysis of vital registration data
T2 - The Lancet Public Health
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2468-2667(18)30214-7
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/65600
VL - 3
ER -