Imperial College London

ProfessorMajidEzzati

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Chair in Global Environmental Health
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 0767majid.ezzati Website

 
 
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Location

 

Norfolk PlaceSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@article{Stevens:2015:10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00039-X,
author = {Stevens, GA and Bennett, JE and Hennocq, Q and Lu, Y and De-Regil, LM and Rogers, L and Danaei, G and Li, G and White, RA and Flaxman, SR and Oehrle, S-P and Finucane, MM and Guerrero, R and Bhutta, ZA and Then-Paulino, A and Fawzi, W and Black, RE and Ezzati, M},
doi = {10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00039-X},
journal = {Lancet Global Health},
pages = {e528--e536},
title = {Trends and mortality effects of vitamin A deficiency in children in 138 low-income and middle-income countries between 1991 and 2013: a pooled analysis of population-based surveys},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00039-X},
volume = {3},
year = {2015}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - JOUR
AB - Background: Vitamin A deficiency is a risk factor for blindness and for mortality from measles and diarrhoea in children aged 6–59 months. We aimed to estimate trends in the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency between 1991 and 2013 and its mortality burden in low-income and middle-income countries.Methods: We collated 134 population-representative data sources from 83 countries with measured serum retinol concentration data. We used a Bayesian hierarchical model to estimate the prevalence of vitamin A deficiency, defined as a serum retinol concentration lower than 0·70 μmol/L. We estimated the relative risks (RRs) for the effects of vitamin A deficiency on mortality from measles and diarrhoea by pooling effect sizes from randomised trials of vitamin A supplementation. We used information about prevalences of deficiency, RRs, and number of cause-specific child deaths to estimate deaths attributable to vitamin A deficiency. All analyses included a systematic quantification of uncertainty.Findings: In 1991, 39% (95% credible interval 27–52) of children aged 6–59 months in low-income and middle-income countries were vitamin A deficient. In 2013, the prevalence of deficiency was 29% (17–42; posterior probability [PP] of being a true decline=0·81). Vitamin A deficiency significantly declined in east and southeast Asia and Oceania from 42% (19–70) to 6% (1–16; PP>0·99); a decline in Latin America and the Caribbean from 21% (11–33) to 11% (4–23; PP=0·89) also occurred. In 2013, the prevalence of deficiency was highest in sub-Saharan Africa (48%; 25–75) and south Asia (44%; 13–79). 94500 (54200–146800) deaths from diarrhoea and 11200 (4300–20500) deaths from measles were attributable to vitamin A deficiency in 2013, which accounted for 1·7% (1·0–2·6) of all deaths in children younger than 5 years in low-income and middle-income countries. M
AU - Stevens,GA
AU - Bennett,JE
AU - Hennocq,Q
AU - Lu,Y
AU - De-Regil,LM
AU - Rogers,L
AU - Danaei,G
AU - Li,G
AU - White,RA
AU - Flaxman,SR
AU - Oehrle,S-P
AU - Finucane,MM
AU - Guerrero,R
AU - Bhutta,ZA
AU - Then-Paulino,A
AU - Fawzi,W
AU - Black,RE
AU - Ezzati,M
DO - 10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00039-X
EP - 536
PY - 2015///
SN - 2214-109X
SP - 528
TI - Trends and mortality effects of vitamin A deficiency in children in 138 low-income and middle-income countries between 1991 and 2013: a pooled analysis of population-based surveys
T2 - Lancet Global Health
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S2214-109X(15)00039-X
UR - http://gateway.webofknowledge.com/gateway/Gateway.cgi?GWVersion=2&SrcApp=PARTNER_APP&SrcAuth=LinksAMR&KeyUT=WOS:000360559500018&DestLinkType=FullRecord&DestApp=ALL_WOS&UsrCustomerID=1ba7043ffcc86c417c072aa74d649202
UR - http://hdl.handle.net/10044/1/48910
VL - 3
ER -