Imperial College London

Dr Martin D. Jaere

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Digital Solutions Manager
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2703martin.jaere11

 
 
//

Location

 

216Building E - Sir Michael UrenWhite City Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

8 results found

Jones G, Clarke S, Harris S, Jaere M, Thunayan A, de Klee P, Cobb Jet al., 2019, A novel patient-specific instrument design can deliver robotic level accuracy in unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, The Knee, Vol: 26, Pages: 1421-1428, ISSN: 0968-0160

BackgroundA previous randomised controlled trial (RCT) by our group found that robotic assisted unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) surgery was significantly more accurate than conventional instrumentation. The aim of this study was to determine whether a low-cost novel PSI design could deliver the same level of accuracy as the robot in the same time efficient manner as conventional instruments.MethodsThirty patients undergoing medial UKA took part. Tibial component position was planned using a low dose CT-scan, and compared to a day 1 postoperative CT-scan to determine the difference between the planned and achieved positions. Operations were performed by one expert surgeon using PSI (Embody, London, UK).ResultsThe mean absolute difference between planned and achieved tibial implant positions using PSI was 2.0° (SD 1.0°) in the coronal plane, 1.8° (SD 1.5) in the sagittal plane, and 4.5° (SD 3.3) in the axial plane. These results were not significantly different to the 13 historical robotic cases (mean difference 0.5°, 0.5°, and 1.7°, p = 0.1907, 0.2867 and 0.1049 respectively). PSI mean operating time was on average 62 min shorter than the robotic group (p < 0.0001) and 40 min shorter than the conventional instrument group (p < 0.0001). No complications were reported.ConclusionsIn conclusion, this clinical trial demonstrates that for tibial component positioning in UKA, a novel design PSI guide in the hands of an expert surgeon, can safely deliver comparable accuracy to a robotic system, whilst being significantly faster than conventional instruments.NIHR Clinical Research Network Reference: 16100.

Journal article

Jones GG, Clarke S, Jaere M, Cobb JPet al., 2019, Prothèse unicompartimentaire et désostéotomie pour échec d’ostéotomie tibiale : une alternative chirurgicale à l’arthroplastie totale de genouFailed high tibial osteotomy: A joint preserving alternative to total knee arthroplasty, Revue de Chirurgie Orthopedique et Traumatologique, Vol: 105, Pages: 41-41, ISSN: 1877-0517

High tibial osteotomy is an attractive treatment option for young active patients wishing to return to high level activities. However, it is not considered a long-term solution, with 30% revised at ten years. Currently, the only revision option is a total knee arthroplasty, a procedure that might not deliver the functional level expected by these highly active patients. This paper describes a novel joint preserving approach to HTO revision, using assistive technology, in the form of 3D printed guides, to reverse the osteotomy and simultaneously perform a unicompartmental knee replacement. The indications and planning aims for this procedure are discussed, and the preliminary results in four patients presented. Level of evidence: IV.

Journal article

Jones GG, Clarke S, Jaere M, Cobb JPet al., 2019, Failed high tibial osteotomy: A joint preserving alternative to total knee arthroplasty, Orthopaedics and Traumatology: Surgery and Research, Vol: 105, Pages: 85-88, ISSN: 1877-0568

High tibial osteotomy is an attractive treatment option for young active patients wishing to return to high-level activities. However, it is not considered a long-term solution, with 30% revised at ten years. Currently, the only revision option is a total knee arthroplasty, a procedure that might not deliver the functional level expected by these highly active patients. This paper describes a novel joint preserving approach to HTO revision, using assistive technology, in the form of 3D printed guides, to reverse the osteotomy and simultaneously perform a unicompartmental knee replacement. The indications and planning aims for this procedure are discussed, and the preliminary results in four patients presented.

Journal article

Jones GG, Logishetty K, Clarke S, Collins R, Jaere M, Harris S, Cobb JPet al., 2018, Do patient-specific instruments (PSI) for UKA allow non-expert surgeons to achieve the same saw cut accuracy as expert surgeons?, Archives of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Vol: 138, Pages: 1601-1608, ISSN: 0936-8051

INTRODUCTION: High-volume unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) surgeons have lower revision rates, in part due to improved intra-operative component alignment. This study set out to determine whether PSI might allow non-expert surgeons to achieve the same level of accuracy as expert surgeons. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-four surgical trainees with no prior experience of UKA, and four high-volume UKA surgeons were asked to perform the tibial saw cuts for a medial UKA in a sawbone model using both conventional and patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) with the aim of achieving a specified pre-operative plan. Half the participants in each group started with conventional instrumentation, and half with PSI. CT scans of the 76 cut sawbones were then segmented and reliably orientated in space, before saw cut position in the sagittal, coronal and axial planes was measured, and compared to the pre-operative plan. RESULTS: The compound error (absolute error in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes combined) for experts using conventional instruments was significantly less than that of the trainees (11.6°±4.0° v 7.7° ±2.3º, p = 0.029). PSI improved trainee accuracy to the same level as experts using conventional instruments (compound error 5.5° ±3.4º v 7.7° ±2.3º, p = 0.396) and patient-specific instruments (compound error 5.5° ±3.4º v 7.3° ±4.1º, p = 0.3). PSI did not improve the accuracy of high-volume surgeons (p = 0.3). CONCLUSIONS: In a sawbone model, PSI allowed inexperienced surgeons to achieve more accurate saw cuts, equivalent to expert surgeons, and thus has the potential to reduce revision rates. The next test will be to determine whether these results can be replicated in a clinical trial.

Journal article

Jones G, Jaere M, Clarke S, van Heerwaarden R, Wilson A, Cobb Jet al., 2018, A Clinical Trial Examining the Accuracy of High Tibial Osteotomy When Performed by Experts Using a Novel Patient Specific Instrument (PSI), SSRN

Journal article

Jones GG, Jaere M, Clarke S, Cobb Jet al., 2018, 3D printing and high tibial osteotomy, EFORT Open Reviews, Vol: 3, Pages: 254-259, ISSN: 2058-5241

High tibial osteotomy (HTO) is a relatively conservative surgical option in the management of medial knee pain. Thus far, the outcomes have been variable, and apparently worse than the arthroplasty alternatives when judged using conventional metrics, owing in large part to uncer-tainty around the extent of the correction planned and achieved.„This review paper introduces the concept of detailed 3D planning of the procedure, and describes the 3D printing technology that enables the plan to be performed.„The different ways that the osteotomy can be undertaken, and the varying guide designs that enable accurate regis-tration are discussed and described. The system accuracy is reported.„In keeping with other assistive technologies, 3D printing enables the surgeon to achieve a preoperative plan with a degree of accuracy that is not possible using conventional instruments. With the advent of low dose CT, it has been possible to confirm that the procedure has been under-taken accurately too.„HTO is the ‘ultimate’ personal intervention: the amount of correction needed for optimal offloading is not yet com-pletely understood.„For the athletic person with early medial joint line over-load who still runs and enjoys life, HTO using 3D printing is an attractive option. The clinical effectiveness remains unproven.

Journal article

Jones GG, Clarke S, Jaere M, Cobb Jet al., 2018, 3D printing and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty, EFORT Open Reviews, Vol: 3, Pages: 248-253, ISSN: 2058-5241

In suitable patients, unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) offers a number of advantages compared with total knee arthroplasty. However, the procedure is technically demanding, with a small tolerance for error. Assistive technology has the potential to improve the accuracy of implant positioning. This review paper describes the concept of detailed UKA planning in 3D, and the 3D printing technology that enables a plan to be delivered intraoperatively using patient-specific instrumentation (PSI). The varying guide designs that enable accurate registration are discussed and described. The system accuracy is reported. Future studies need to ascertain whether accuracy for low-volume surgeons can be delivered in the operating theatre using PSI, and reflected in improved patient reported outcome measures, and lower revision rates.

Journal article

Clarke S, Cobb J, Jaere M, Jones G, Kley K, Lobenhoffer P, McCrum C, Musahl V, Takeuchi Ret al., 2018, Osteotomies: Advanced and complex techniques, ESSKA Instructional Course Lecture Book: Glasgow 2018, Pages: 129-151, ISBN: 9783662561263

We started performing precise surgery based upon CT plans in the last century - the first embodiment of this approach was a robotic assistant built for total knee replacement, the “Acrobot” [1]. Abundant evidence now exists to confirm that assistive technologies enable surgeons to achieve their preoperative goals [2]. The concept of planned surgery is therefore not novel. Patient-matched instruments share several key elements with the robotic platform, and these formed the basis of this current project. The essential elements include image segmentation, planning, and registration. We applied the know-how of these dimensions to design and build patient-matched guides for a range of tasks using biocompatible polymer 3D printers. Having established a workflow for arthroplasty, the adaptation of the same principles to osteotomy was a short step, requiring software to be developed to deliver semiautomated useful information regarding limb segment alignment and the shapes of bones.

Book chapter

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00724688&limit=30&person=true