Imperial College London

DrNejraVan Zalk

Faculty of EngineeringDyson School of Design Engineering

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n.van-zalk

 
 
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Dyson BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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25 results found

Van Zalk N, 2020, The Development of Internalizing Behaviors in Early Adolescence: Introduction to the Special Issue, JOURNAL OF EARLY ADOLESCENCE, ISSN: 0272-4316

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Tillfors M, Mortberg E, 2020, Social Anxiety-Impulsivity Subgroups and Links to Later Emotional Adjustment in Adolescence: A Latent Transition Analysis, JOURNAL OF EARLY ADOLESCENCE, ISSN: 0272-4316

Journal article

van Zalk N, van Zalk M, 2020, Early adolescent disclosure and parental knowledge regarding online activities: Social anxiety and parental rule-setting as moderators, Current Psychology, Vol: 39, Pages: 287-298, ISSN: 1046-1310

Early adolescents spend a lot of time online, yet little is currently known about the links between parental rule-setting, adolescent disclosure about online activities, and whether social anxiety may interfere with these processes. Using a longitudinal sample of 526 adolescents (269 girls; Mage = 14.00) and their parents (79% mothers, Mage = 43.66), the results from the current study showed low correspondence between parental knowledge, adolescent disclosure, as well as parents’ and adolescents’ ratings of parental legitimacy to set boundaries about online activities. High social anxiety interacted with high adolescent-rated parental rule-setting in predicting the least disclosure about chatting with strangers and posting online content over time. Also, high social anxiety interacted with low parent-rated control to predict more adolescent disclosure about chatting with strangers and money spent online over time. Thus, social anxiety and parental rule-setting moderated the links between disclosure and knowledge for some early adolescent online activities. Our results conflict with the value typically placed on parental rule-setting in online contexts, at least for socially anxious adolescents.

Journal article

Thompson T, Van Zalk N, Marshall C, Sargeant M, Stubbs Bet al., 2019, Social anxiety increases visible anxiety signs during social encounters but does not impair performance., BMC Psychol, Vol: 7

BACKGROUND: Preliminary evidence suggests that impairment of social performance in socially anxious individuals may be specific to selective aspects of performance and be more pronounced in females. This evidence is based primarily on contrasting results from studies using all-male or all-female samples or that differ in type of social behaviour assessed. However, methodological differences (e.g. statistical power, participant population) across these studies means it is difficult to determine whether behavioural or gender-specific effects are genuine or artefactual. The current study examined whether the link between social anxiety and social behaviour was dependent upon gender and the behavioural dimension assessed within the same study under methodologically homogenous conditions. METHODS: Ninety-three university students (45 males, 48 females) with a mean age of 25.6 years and varying in their level of social anxiety underwent an interaction and a speech task. The speech task involved giving a brief impromptu presentation in front of a small group of three people, while the interaction task involved "getting to know" an opposite-sex confederate. Independent raters assessed social performance on 5 key dimensions from Fydrich's Social Performance Rating Scale. RESULTS: Regression analysis revealed a significant moderate association of social anxiety with behavioral discomfort (e.g., fidgeting, trembling) for interaction and speech tasks, but no association with other performance dimensions (e.g., verbal fluency, quality of verbal expression). No sex differences were found. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that the impairing effects of social anxiety within the non-clinical range may exacerbate overt behavioral agitation during high demand social challenges but have little impact on other observable aspects of performance quality.

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Van Zalk M, 2019, Longitudinal links between adolescent social anxiety and depressive symptoms: testing the mediational effects of cybervictimization, Child Psychiatry and Human Development, Vol: 50, Pages: 186-197, ISSN: 0009-398X

This study focuses on the temporal sequence between social anxiety and depressive symptoms, and whether cybervictimization might mediate these links. We used a longitudinal sample of 501 early adolescents (51.9% girls; Mage = 13.96) followed at three time points. Using a cross-lagged path model in MPlus, we found that social anxiety predicted depressive symptoms over time, but not the other way around. Time-1 depressive symptoms also predicted cybervictimization, but only for boys and not for girls. No mediating effects of cybervictimization emerged; however, Time-2 social anxiety was a significant mediator between Time-1 social anxiety and depressive symptoms, whereas Time-2 depressive symptoms significantly mediated the link between Time-1 social anxiety and Time-3 depressive symptoms. In sum, social anxiety was a strong predictor of depressive symptoms over time but not vice versa-irrespective of cybervictimization.

Journal article

Thompson T, Kaminska M, Marshall C, Van Zalk Net al., 2019, Evaluation of the social phobia scale and social interaction anxiety scale as assessments of performance and interaction anxiety, PSYCHIATRY RESEARCH, Vol: 273, Pages: 725-731, ISSN: 0165-1781

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Smith R, 2019, Internalizing Profiles of Homeless Adults: Investigating Links Between Perceived Ostracism and Need-Threat, FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1664-1078

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Tillfors M, Trost K, 2018, Mothers' and Fathers' Worry and Over-Control: One Step Closer to Understanding Early Adolescent Social Anxiety, CHILD PSYCHIATRY & HUMAN DEVELOPMENT, Vol: 49, Pages: 917-927, ISSN: 0009-398X

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Lamb ME, Rentfrow PJ, 2017, Does shyness vary according to attained social roles? Trends across age groups in a large British sample, Journal of Personality, Vol: 85, Pages: 830-840, ISSN: 0022-3506

ObjectiveThe current study investigated (a) how a composite measure of shyness comprising introversion and neuroticism relates to other well‐known constructs involving social fears, and (b) whether mean levels of shyness vary for men and women depending on the adoption of various social roles.MethodStudy 1 used a sample of 211 UK participants aged 17–70 (64% female; Mage = 47.90). Study 2 used data from a large cross‐sectional data set with UK participants aged 17–70 (Ntarget = 552,663; 64% female; Mage = 34.19 years).ResultsStudy 1 showed that shyness measured as a composite of introversion and neuroticism was highly correlated with other constructs involving social fears. Study 2 indicated that, controlling for various sociodemographic variables, females appeared to have higher levels, whereas males appeared to have lower levels of shyness. Males and females who were in employment had the lowest shyness levels, whereas those working in unskilled jobs had the highest levels and people working in sales the lowest levels of shyness. Participants in relationships had lower levels of shyness than those not in relationships, but parenthood was not associated with shyness.ConclusionsMean levels of shyness are likely to vary according to adopted social roles, gender, and age.

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Tillfors M, 2017, Co-rumination buffers the link between social anxiety and depressive symptoms in early adolescence, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-12, ISSN: 1753-2000

ObjectivesWe examined whether co-rumination with online friends buffered the link between social anxiety and depressive symptoms over time in a community sample.MethodsIn a sample of 526 participants (358 girls; M age = 14.05) followed at three time points, we conducted a latent cross-lagged model with social anxiety, depressive symptoms, and co-rumination, controlling for friendship stability and friendship quality, and adding a latent interaction between social anxiety and co-rumination predicting depressive symptoms.ResultsSocial anxiety predicted depressive symptoms, but no direct links between social anxiety and co-rumination emerged. Instead, co-rumination buffered the link between social anxiety and depressive symptoms for adolescents with higher but not lower levels of social anxiety.ConclusionsThese findings indicate that co-rumination exerted a positive influence on interpersonal relationships by diminishing the influence from social anxiety on depressive symptoms over time.

Journal article

Van Zalk N, 2016, Social anxiety moderates the links between excessive chatting and compulsive Internet use, Cyberpsychology-Journal of Psychosocial Research on Cyberspace, Vol: 10, ISSN: 1802-7962

Excessive online chatting can lead to unwanted consequences such as compulsive Internetuse over time. Not all adolescents use chatting for the same purpose, however, and these links may not be as pronounced for socially anxious adolescents as they likely communicate with others online in order to compensate for offline social inadequacies. The current study investigated whether social anxiety moderated the links between excessive chatting and compulsive Internet use over time. Using a sample of 523 early adolescents (269 girls; Mage= 14.00) from a 3-wave longitudinal study, the links between excessive chatting and compulsive Internet use were investigated via manifest autoregressive models, and moderating effects of social anxiety were tested via multiple-group comparison procedures. The results showed bidirectional links between excessive chatting and compulsive Internet use from Time 2–Time 3, as excessive chatting predicted more symptoms of compulsive Internet use, whereas compulsive Internet use predicted more excessive chatting –over and above the effects of gender. These links were present for adolescents low on social anxiety, but they were largely missing for highly socially anxious adolescents. Thus, social anxiety may have protective effects for early adolescents who spend too much time chatting online, as it may help reduce the risk of developing symptoms of compulsive Internet use.

Journal article

Van Zalk MHW, Van Zalk N, 2015, Violent peer influence: The roles of self-esteem and psychopathic traits, DEVELOPMENT AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY, Vol: 27, Pages: 1077-1088, ISSN: 0954-5794

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Van Zalk M, 2015, The Importance of Perceived Care and Connectedness with Friends and Parents for Adolescent Social Anxiety, JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Vol: 83, Pages: 346-360, ISSN: 0022-3506

Journal article

Tillfors M, Van Zalk N, 2015, Easier to Accelerate Than to Slow Down: Contributions of Developmental Neurobiology for the Understanding of Adolescent Social Anxiety, Social Anxiety and Phobia in Adolescents, Publisher: Springer International Publishing, Pages: 71-94, ISBN: 9783319167022

Book chapter

Mortberg E, Tillfors M, van Zalk N, Kerr Met al., 2014, An atypical anxious-impulsive pattern of social anxiety disorder in an adult clinical population, SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 55, Pages: 350-356, ISSN: 0036-5564

Journal article

van Zalk MHW, Van Zalk N, Kerr M, Stattin Het al., 2014, Influences Between Online-Exclusive, Conjoint and Offline-Exclusive Friendship Networks: The Moderating Role of Shyness, EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Vol: 28, Pages: 134-146, ISSN: 0890-2070

Journal article

Tillfors M, Van Zalk N, Kerr M, 2013, Investigating a socially anxious-impulsive subgroup of adolescents: A prospective community study, SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 54, Pages: 267-273, ISSN: 0036-5564

Journal article

van Zalk MHW, Kerr M, van Zalk N, Stattin Het al., 2013, Xenophobia and Tolerance Toward Immigrants in Adolescence: Cross-Influence Processes Within Friendships, JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 41, Pages: 627-639, ISSN: 0091-0627

Journal article

Tillfors M, Mörtberg E, Zalk NV, Kerr Met al., 2013, Inhibited and impulsive subgroups of socially anxious young adults: Their depressive symptoms and life satisfaction, Open Journal of Psychiatry, Vol: 03, Pages: 195-201, ISSN: 2161-7325

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Van Zalk MHW, Kerr M, 2011, Socialization of Social Anxiety in Adolescent Crowds, JOURNAL OF ABNORMAL CHILD PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 39, Pages: 1239-1249, ISSN: 0091-0627

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Kerr M, 2011, Shy Adolescents' Perceptions of Parents' Psychological Control and Emotional Warmth: Examining Bidirectional Links, MERRILL-PALMER QUARTERLY-JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 57, Pages: 375-401, ISSN: 0272-930X

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Kerr M, Tilton-Weaver L, 2011, Shyness as a moderator of the link between advanced maturity and early adolescent risk behavior, SCANDINAVIAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGY, Vol: 52, Pages: 341-353, ISSN: 0036-5564

Journal article

Van Zalk N, Van Zalk M, Kerr M, Stattin Het al., 2011, Social Anxiety as a Basis for Friendship Selection and Socialization in Adolescents' Social Networks, JOURNAL OF PERSONALITY, Vol: 79, Pages: 499-526, ISSN: 0022-3506

Journal article

Besic N, Kerr M, 2009, Punks, Goths, and Other Eye-Catching Peer Crowds: Do They Fulfill a Function for Shy Youths?, JOURNAL OF RESEARCH ON ADOLESCENCE, Vol: 19, Pages: 113-121, ISSN: 1050-8392

Journal article

Munoz LC, Kerr M, Besic N, 2008, The peer relationships of youths with psychopathic personality traits - A matter of perspective, CRIMINAL JUSTICE AND BEHAVIOR, Vol: 35, Pages: 212-227, ISSN: 0093-8548

Journal article

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