Imperial College London

Dr Neil Jennings

Faculty of Natural SciencesThe Grantham Institute for Climate Change

Partnership Development Manager
 
 
 
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Contact

 

neil.jennings Website

 
 
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Location

 

Sherfield BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

26 results found

Lewis-Brown E, Jennings N, Mills M, Ewers Ret al., 2024, Comparison of carbon management and emissions of universities that did and did not adopt voluntary carbon offsets, Climate Policy, Vol: 24, Pages: 706-722, ISSN: 1469-3062

The urgent need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, remove carbon from the atmosphere and stabilize natural carbon sinks has led to the development of many carbon management measures, increasingly including voluntary carbon offsets (VCOs). We studied carbon management in universities, institutions with large carbon footprints and considerable influence in climate science and policy fora. However, concerns that VCOs may deter adopters (including universities) from adopting other carbon reduction measures and limit emissions reductions, for example, through moral hazard, have been raised but understudied. We compared the carbon management characteristics (priorities, policies, practices and emissions) of universities that did and did not adopt VCOs. We found adopters measured carbon emissions for longer, and had set targets to reach net zero earlier than had non-adopters. Adopters of VCOs also undertook more carbon management practices in both 2010 and 2020 than non-adopters. We also found that both adopters and non-adopters significantly increased their carbon management practices over the decade studied, but with no difference between groups. Gross CO2 emissions were reduced significantly over time by adopters of VCOs but not by non-adopters, whereas carbon intensity and percentage annual emissions reductions did not relate to adoption status. Consequently, our study showed no indication of mitigation deterrence due to adoption of VCOs at the universities studied. Rather, greater emissions reductions correlated with earlier net zero target dates, and a higher number of policies and carbon management practices. However, our study was constrained to universities that were affiliated with a national environmental network, so research beyond these organizations, and with individuals, would be useful. The survey was voluntary, exposing the study to potential self-selection bias so the findings may not be generalized beyond the study group. Finally, we found the carbon ac

Journal article

Halkyard S, Levey S, Amer H, Brogan C, Butler L, Cannon C, Davenport F, Duncan C, Dunning H, Evanson D, Ford P, Fredenburgh J, Gokdemir T, Govan E, Heyburn J, Jennings N, Johns S, Kuchapski N, McNally C, Mundell I, Murphy V, Ross P, Silverman D, Singleton L, Taylor J, A Thousand Monkeys, Wilson J, Wynton Let al., 2024, Grantham Institute Outlook 2023-2024, www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham

The Grantham Institute Outlook magazine provides an overview of the climate and environmental research underway at Imperial College London, encompassing both recent achievements and future plans.

Report

Jennings N, Paterson P, Whitmarsh L, Howarth Cet al., 2024, What do the UK public think about the co-benefits that climate action can bring?

This slide deck summarises findings from a nationally representative sample (on the basis of age, gender and ethnicity) of 1,021 people who were asked to share their opinions about the co-benefits of climate action. People were surveyed via the online survey platform Prolific on Monday 12th February 2024. The headline findings and recommendations are followed by a case study focused on homes that are more affordable to heat. The insights in this slide deck build on findings from a Grantham report published in October 2023, How do UK citizens perceive the co-benefits of climate action? which included survey and focus groups with members of the UK public.

Report

Jennings N, Paterson P, 2023, How do UK citizens perceive the co-benefits of climate action?

Report

Croasdale K, Grailey K, Jennings N, Mole J, Lawrance Eet al., 2023, Planning for the perfect storm: perceptions of UK mental health professionals on the increasing impacts of climate change on their service users, The Journal of Climate Change and Health, Vol: 13, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2667-2782

IntroductionClimate change poses a considerable risk of further increasing the world's mental health burden. The ways that, and extent to which, climate change is affecting mental health service users is poorly known. Mental health professionals (MHP)s' views on the nature of climate-related distress and the need for specialist training to support service users is undetermined globally.MethodsA questionnaire survey was disseminated to an opportunity sample of MHPs based in the United Kingdom (UK). It investigated whether MHPs perceived that the number of service users mentioning climate change as affecting their mental health or emotional distress had increased in the five years prior to 2021, and if they believe it will increase further. The survey explored MHPs’ perceptions of the influence of climate change on service users’ mental health needs, if they perceive this to be rational, and if they feel adequately prepared to manage climate change related mental health problems or emotional distress.ResultsWe surveyed 75 MHPs, including professionals in psychotherapy (38), psychology (19), psychiatry (6). MHPs reported a significant increase in the perceived prevalence of mental health problems or emotional distress related to climate change, believing this increase will continue. MHPs reported a range of impacts on service users due to climate change, typically viewed as a rational response. MHPs felt equipped to manage the consequences of climate change but would benefit from specific training.ConclusionsOur results indicate an increasing incidence of climate-related emotional distress among service users as perceived by MHPs. The expectation among professionals is that this service need is here now but will continue to increase in the future, with potential implications for the provision of training.

Journal article

Alford J, Massazza A, Jennings NR, Lawrance Eet al., 2023, Developing global recommendations for action on climate change and mental health across sectors: a Delphi-style study, The Journal of Climate Change and Health, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2667-2782

Climate change is causing far-reaching yet underappreciated worsening of outcomes across the mental health and wellbeing spectrum. Despite increasing attention to the mental health impacts of climate change, an absence of a clear, cross-sectoral agenda for action has held back progress against the dual and interconnected challenges of supporting human and planetary health. This study aims to serve as an essential first step to address this gap. Harnessing the expertise of a diverse panel of 61 participants, representing 24 nationalities, this study developed and prioritized recommendations for action on climate change and mental health across the relevant sectors of research, policy, healthcare and the third sector, and used a Delphi-style methodology to examine their feasibility and importance. Broadly, the prioritized recommendations highlighted the need to expand the evidence base, work collaboratively across sectors, and raise awareness. While broadly there was consensus on recommendation importance, there was greater variation in the reported feasibility of the recommendations, which differed across settings. Other common themes included the need for cultural and resource contextualization, raising awareness of and addressing mental health co-benefits via climate action, and working with communities with lived experience to develop and implement the findings. As there may be some interdependencies between the recommendations, further work needs to identify how best to implement them. The recommendations serve as a robust and evidence-based framework that can be used as a foundation to devise locally appropriate, concrete implementation strategies matching levels of need and resource. These also serve as a clear call to action for investment from leaders across sectors to ensure they are realized.

Journal article

Halkyard S, Levey S, Amer H, Bushby L, Evanson D, Fredenburgh J, Gilbert A, Jennings N, Houston A, Johns S, Kincaid C, Kuchapski N, Petersen K, Wilson J, Wynton Let al., 2023, Grantham Institute Outlook 2022-2023, Grantham Institute Outlook 2022-2023, www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham, Publisher: Grantham Institute

The Grantham Institute Outlook magazine provides an overview of the climate and environmental research underway at Imperial College London, encompassing both recent achievements and future plans.

Report

Baker W, Acha S, Jennings N, Markides C, Shah Net al., 2022, Decarbonisation of buildings: Insights from across Europe, Decarbonisation of buildings: Insights from across Europe, Publisher: The Grantham Institute

This report considers four key challenges facing the UK in reducing carbon emissions from its building stock, and shares insights from across Europe that have the potential to help the UK to decarbonise and increase the energy efficiency of its buildings.

Report

Pirkle L, 2022, Current Understanding of the Impact of Climate Change on Mental Health within UK Parliament, Frontiers in Public Health Planetary Health, ISSN: 2296-2565

Journal article

Roberts L, Lounsbury O, Awuzudike V, Lawrance E, Jennings Net al., 2022, Healthy environments: Understanding perceptions of underrepresented communities in the United Kingdom, International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, Vol: 19, Pages: 1-21, ISSN: 1660-4601

A healthy environment has been defined by global health organisations as one that is safe, supportive of healthy lifestyles, and free of hazards. Such definitions disregard the complexity of what it means for an environment to be perceived as ‘healthy’—such as the mental, not just physical, health effects on citizens. This study aimed to understand the attributes that underrepresented groups of the United Kingdom (UK) public assign to healthy environments—an important step for directing public policy and actions to create environments that are inclusive of all citizens. This co-created study involved 95 participants from underrepresented communities in 10 separate focus groups, each facilitated by a community member. Thematic analyses highlighted five key attributes of a healthy environment: sounds and sights, accessibility, safety, familiarity and mental health and wellbeing. This study draws a picture of key attributes underrepresented groups of the UK public assign to healthy environments that is richer than that drawn by existing definitions. These findings illustrate the importance of hearing diverse voices when directing research, policy, and actions that attempt to develop healthy environments for all.

Journal article

Lawrance E, Jennings N, Kioupi V, Thompson R, Diffey J, Vercammen Aet al., 2022, Young person's psychological responses, mental health, and sense of agency for the dual challenges of climate change and a global pandemic in the UK: an online survey study, The Lancet Planetary Health, ISSN: 2542-5196

Journal article

Lawrance EL, Thompson R, Newberry Le Vay J, Page L, Jennings Net al., 2022, The Impact of Climate Change on Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing: A Narrative Review of Current Evidence, and its Implications, INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF PSYCHIATRY, Vol: 34, Pages: 443-498, ISSN: 0954-0261

Journal article

Levey S, Gilbert A, Amer H, Wynton L, Jennings N, Petersen Ket al., 2022, Grantham Institute Outlook 2021-2022, Grantham Institute Outlook 2021-2022, http://www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham, Publisher: Grantham Institute

The Grantham Institute's annual Outlook magazine provides an overview of the climate and environmental research and activities underway at Imperial College London, encompassing both recent achievements and future plans.

Report

Stevenson S, Collins A, Jennings N, Koberle AC, Laumann F, Laverty AA, Vineis P, Woods J, Gambhir Aet al., 2021, A hybrid approach to identifying and assessing interactions between climate action (SDG13) policies and a range of SDGs in a UK context (vol 2, 43, 2021), DISCOVER SUSTAINABILITY, Vol: 2

Journal article

Brondizio ES, Lemos MC, Guan D, Jennings N, Mbow C, Nagendra H, Tschakert Pet al., 2021, Global Environmental Change: 30 years of interdisciplinary research on the human and policy dimensions of environmental change, Global Environmental Change, Vol: 71, Pages: 1-2, ISSN: 0959-3780

Journal article

Chastin S, Jennings N, Toney J, Diaz Anadon L, Smith Pet al., 2021, Co-benefits of climate change mitigation and adaptation actions, Co-Benefits of Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Actions

Report

Stevenson S, Collins A, Jennings N, Koberle A, Laumann F, Laverty A, Vineis P, Woods J, Gambhir Aet al., 2021, A hybrid approach to identifying and assessing interactions between climate action (SDG13) policies and a range of SDGs in a UK context, Discover Sustainability, Vol: 2, ISSN: 2662-9984

In 2015 the United Nations drafted the Paris Agreement and established the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for all nations. A question of increasing relevance is the extent to which the pursuit of climate action (SDG 13) interacts both positively and negatively with other SDGs. We tackle this question through a two-pronged approach: a novel, automated keyword search to identify linkages between SDGs and UK climate-relevant policies; and a detailed expert survey to evaluate these linkages through specific examples. We consider a particular subset of SDGs relating to health, economic growth, affordable and clean energy and sustainable cities and communities. Overall, we find that of the 89 UK climate-relevant policies assessed, most are particularly interlinked with the delivery of SDG 7 (Affordable and Clean Energy) and SDG 11 (Sustainable Cities and Communities) and that certain UK policies, like the Industrial Strategy and 25-Year Environment Plan, interlink with a wide range of SDGs. Focusing on these climate-relevant policies is therefore likely to deliver a wide range of synergies across SDGs 3 (Good Health and Well-being), 7, 8 (Decent Work and Economic Growth), 9 (Industry, Innovation and Infrastructure), 11, 14 (Life Below Water) and 15 (Life on Land). The expert survey demonstrates that in addition to the range of mostly synergistic interlinkages identified in the keyword search, there are also important potential trade-offs to consider. Our analysis provides an important new toolkit for the research and policy communities to consider interactions between SDGs, which can be employed across a range of national and international contexts.

Journal article

Ainalis D, Bardhan R, Bell K, Cebon D, Czerniak M, Doyne Farmer J, Fitzgerland S, Galkowski K, Grimshaw S, Harper G, Hunt H, Jennings N, Keshav S, Mackie E, Maroto-Valer M, Michalopoulou E, Reay D, Seddon N, Smith SM, Smith T, Simpson K, Stranks SD, Tennyson EM, Uekert T, Vera-Morales M, Woodcock Jet al., 2021, Net-zero solutions and research priorities in the 2020s, Net-Zero Solutions and Research Priorities in the 2020s

Key messages• Technological, societal and nature-based solutions should work together to enable systemic change towards a regenerative society, and to deliver net-zero greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.• Prioritise research into efficient, low-carbon and carbon-negative solutions for sectors that are difficult to decarbonise; i.e. energy storage, road transport, shipping, aviation and grid infrastructure.• Each solution should be assessed with respect to GHG emissions reductions, energy efficiency and societal implications to provide a basis for developing long-term policies, maximising positive impact of investment and research effort, and guiding industry investors in safe and responsible planning.

Report

Mitchell-Larson E, Green T, Lewis-Brown E, Jennings N, Joly C, Goodwin F, Reay D, Rothman R, Scott C, Allen M, Forster Pet al., 2021, How can carbon offsetting help UK further and higher education institutions achieve net zero emissions?, COP26 Universities Network Briefin, Publisher: COP26 Universities Network

There are a range of views on the use of carbonoffsetting among academics, higher and furthereducation professional staff, corporates andoffsetting providers. When and where offsets shouldbe used or not used, and what types of offsets to use,are to some extent value-laden choices. These choicesare being actively debated at the international andcommunity level. This briefing note provides guidance to support the development of further and highereducation offsetting policies and to challengeinstitutions, including our own. It specifically discussesthe use of offsetting in the context of net zerostrategies. We are also using the briefing to consultour institutions on the approaches they are taking.We hope it prompts discussion and collective actiontowards making net zero a reality.

Report

Levey S, Gilbert A, Amer H, Petersen K, Jennings N, Butler Cet al., 2020, Grantham Institute Outlook 2020-2021, Grantham Institute Outlook 2020-2021, www.imperial.ac.uk/grantham, Publisher: Grantham Institute, Imperial College London

The Grantham Institute Outlook magazine provides an overview of the climate and environmental research underway at Imperial College London, encompassing both recent achievements and future plans.

Report

Jennings N, Rao M, 2020, Towards a carbon neutral NHS, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 371, ISSN: 0959-535X

Journal article

Jennings N, Fecht D, De Matteis S, 2020, Mapping the co-benefits of climate change action to issues of public concern in the UK: a narrative review, The Lancet Planetary Health, Vol: 4, Pages: e424-e433, ISSN: 2542-5196

To avoid a 1·5°C rise in global temperatures above preindustrial levels, the next phase of reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will need to be comparatively rapid. Linking the co-benefits of climate action to wider issues that the public are concerned about can help decision makers to prioritise decarbonisation options that increase the chance of public support for such changes, while ensuring that a just transition is delivered. We identified key issues of concern to the UK public by use of Ipsos MORI public opinion data from 2007 to 2020 and used these data to guide a narrative review of academic and grey literature on the co-benefits of climate change action for the UK. Correspondence with civil servants, third sector organisations, and relevant academics allowed us to identify omissions and to ensure policy relevance of the recommendations. This evidence-based Review of the various co-benefits of climate change action for the UK identifies four main areas: health and the National Health Service; security; economy and unemployment; and poverty, housing, and inequality. Associated trade-offs are also discussed. City-level and regional-level governments are particularly well placed to incorporate co-benefits into their decision making because it is at this scale that co-benefits most clearly manifest, and where interventions can have the most immediate effects.

Journal article

Jennings N, Fecht D, De Matteis S, 2019, Co-benefits of climate change mitigation in the UK: What issues are the UK public concerned about and how can action on climate change help to address them?

Report

Bull R, Romanowicz J, Jennings N, Laskari M, Stuart G, Everitt Det al., 2018, Competing priorities: lessons in engaging students to achieve energy savings in universities, International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Vol: 19, ISSN: 1467-6370

PurposeThis paper aims to present findings from an EU-funded international student-led energy saving competition (SAVES) on a scale previously unseen. There are multiple accounts of short-term projects and energy saving competitions encouraging pro-environmental behaviour change amongst students in university dormitories, but the purpose of this research is to provide evidence of consistent and sustained energy savings from student-led energy savings competitions, underpinned by practical action.Design/methodology/approachA mixed-methods approach (pre- and post-intervention surveys, focus groups and analysis of energy meter data) was used to determine the level of energy savings and quantifiable behaviour change delivered by students across participating university dormitories.FindingsThis research has provided further insight into the potential for savings and behaviour change in university dormitories through relatively simple actions. Whilst other interventions have shown greater savings, this project provided consistent savings over two years of 7 per cent across a large number of university dormitories in five countries through simple behaviour changes.Research limitations/implicationsAn energy dashboard displaying near a real-time leaderboard was added to the engagement in the second year of the project. Whilst students were optimistic about the role that energy dashboards could play, the evidence is not here to quantify the impact of dashboards. Further research is required to understand the potential of dashboards to contribute to behavioural change savings and in constructing competitions between people and dormitories that are known to each other.Social implicationsSAVES provided engagement with students, enabling, empowering and motivating them to save energy – focusing specifically on the last stage of the “Awareness, Interest, Desire, Action” framework. Automated meter reading data was used in the majority of participating dormitories

Journal article

Jennings N, Hulme M, 2010, UK newspaper (mis)representations of the potential for a collapse of the Thermohaline Circulation, AREA, Vol: 42, Pages: 444-456, ISSN: 0004-0894

Journal article

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