Imperial College London

ProfessorNickOliver

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Wynn Chair in Human Metabolism (Clinical)
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 1796nick.oliver

 
 
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Location

 

7S7aCommonwealth BuildingHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
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256 results found

Shah VN, Akturk HK, Vigers T, Pyle L, Oliver N, Klonoff DCet al., 2022, Relationship Between Daytime Versus Nighttime Continuous Glucose Monitoring Metrics with A1C in Adults with Type 1 Diabetes., Diabetes Technol Ther

Objective: To evaluate influence of daytime versus nighttime continuous glucose monitoring (CGM)-based metrics on A1C in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Research Design and Methods: CGM data from 407 adults with T1D (age 39 ± 15 years, diabetes duration 20 ± 12 years, A1C 7.3% ± 1.4% and 53% female) from two studies were included in this analysis. The association between daytime (6 AM-10.59 PM) and nighttime (11 PM-5.59 AM) CGM variables such as mean glucose, time in range (TIR; 70-180 mg/dL), time in tight target range (TTIR; 70-140 mg/dL), and time above range (TAR >180 mg/dL) was examined within five A1C categories (<7%, 7%-7.9%, 8%-8.9%, 9%-9.9%, and ≥10%). Results: Although mean glucose was increasing with higher A1C, there was no statistical difference in mean glucose between daytime versus nighttime within five A1C groups (143.2 ± 22.7 vs. 143.6 ± 25.0 for A1C <7%, 171.4 ± 17.3 vs. 175.3 ± 28.8 for A1C 7.0%-7.9%, 193.4 ± 19.4 vs. 195.3 ± 29.5 for A1C 8.0%-8.9%, 214.9 ± 28.8 vs. 219.7 ± 36.1 for A1C 9.0%-9.9% and 244.0 ± 39.0 vs. 239.9 ± 50.9 for A1C ≥10%, P > 0.05). Similarly, there was no difference between various CGM metrics by daytime versus nighttime within five A1C groups. Differences between five A1C groups' daytime versus nighttime mean glucose, TIR, TTIR, and TAR were also not statistically significant (all P > 0.05) Conclusion: Daytime versus nighttime glycemic control has similar influence on A1C in adults with T1D.

Journal article

Thomas NJ, Walkey HC, Kaur A, Misra S, Oliver NS, Colclough K, Weedon MN, Johnston DG, Hattersley AT, Patel KAet al., 2022, The relationship between islet autoantibody status and the genetic risk of type 1 diabetes in adult-onset type 1 diabetes., Diabetologia

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The reason for the observed lower rate of islet autoantibody positivity in clinician-diagnosed adult-onset vs childhood-onset type 1 diabetes is not known. We aimed to explore this by assessing the genetic risk of type 1 diabetes in autoantibody-negative and -positive children and adults. METHODS: We analysed GAD autoantibodies, insulinoma-2 antigen autoantibodies and zinc transporter-8 autoantibodies (ZnT8A) and measured type 1 diabetes genetic risk by genotyping 30 type 1 diabetes-associated variants at diagnosis in 1814 individuals with clinician-diagnosed type 1 diabetes (1112 adult-onset, 702 childhood-onset). We compared the overall type 1 diabetes genetic risk score (T1DGRS) and non-HLA and HLA (DR3-DQ2, DR4-DQ8 and DR15-DQ6) components with autoantibody status in those with adult-onset and childhood-onset diabetes. We also measured the T1DGRS in 1924 individuals with type 2 diabetes from the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium to represent non-autoimmune diabetes control participants. RESULTS: The T1DGRS was similar in autoantibody-negative and autoantibody-positive clinician-diagnosed childhood-onset type 1 diabetes (mean [SD] 0.274 [0.034] vs 0.277 [0.026], p=0.4). In contrast, the T1DGRS in autoantibody-negative adult-onset type 1 diabetes was lower than that in autoantibody-positive adult-onset type 1 diabetes (mean [SD] 0.243 [0.036] vs 0.271 [0.026], p<0.0001) but higher than that in type 2 diabetes (mean [SD] 0.229 [0.034], p<0.0001). Autoantibody-negative adults were more likely to have the more protective HLA DR15-DQ6 genotype (15% vs 3%, p<0.0001), were less likely to have the high-risk HLA DR3-DQ2/DR4-DQ8 genotype (6% vs 19%, p<0.0001) and had a lower non-HLA T1DGRS (p<0.0001) than autoantibody-positive adults. In contrast to children, autoantibody-negative adults were more likely to be male (75% vs 59%), had a higher BMI (27 vs 24 kg/m2) and were less likely to have other autoimmune conditions (2% vs 10%) than a

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Finding positives, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Fuelling inequality, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Fallon C, Jones E, Oliver N, Reddy M, Avari Pet al., 2022, The impact of socio-economic deprivation on access to diabetes technology in adults with type 1 diabetes., Diabet Med, Vol: 39

BACKGROUND: With advances in technology, there is an emerging concern that inequalities exist in provision and diabetes outcomes in areas of greater deprivation. We assess the relationship between socio-economic status and deprivation with access to diabetes technology and their outcomes in adults with type 1 diabetes. METHODS: Retrospective, observational analysis of adults attending a tertiary centre, comprising three urban hospitals in the UK. Socio-economic deprivation was assessed by the English Indices of Deprivation 2019. Data analysis was performed using one-way ANOVAs and chi-squared tests. RESULTS: In total, 1631 adults aged 44 ± 15 years and 758 (47%) women were included, with 391 (24%) using continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion, 312 (19%) using real-time continuous glucose monitoring and 558 (34%) using intermittently scanned continuous glucose monitoring. The highest use of diabetes technology was in the least deprived quintile compared to the most deprived quintile (67% vs. 45%, respectively; p < 0.001). HbA1c outcomes were available in 400 participants; no association with deprivation was observed (p = 0.872). Participation in structured education was almost twice as high from the most deprived to the least deprived groups (23% vs. 43%; p < 0.001). Adults with white or mixed ethnicity were more likely to use technology compared to black ethnicity (60% vs. 40%; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Adults living in the most deprived quintile had less technology use. Irrespective of socio-economic status or ethnicity, glycaemia was positively affected in all groups. It is imperative that health disparities are further addressed.

Journal article

Sourij C, Aziz F, Kojzar H, Obermayer AM, Sternad C, Muller A, Tripolt NJ, Pferschy PN, Aberer F, Schlenke P, Kleinhappl B, Stradner M, Sareban N, Moritz M, Dominguez-Villar M, Oliver N, Steinmetz I, Sourij Het al., 2022, Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 spike antibody level decline is more pronounced after the second vaccination, but response to the third vaccination is similar in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compared with healthy controls: The prospective COVAC-DM cohort study, DIABETES OBESITY & METABOLISM, ISSN: 1462-8902

Journal article

Acciaroli G, van der Linden J, Chao C, Walker TC, Oliver Net al., 2022, Longitudinal analysis of users transitioning from the Dexcom G5 to the G6 RT-CGM system in Germany, Sweden and the United Kingdom (2018-2020), DIABETIC MEDICINE, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Learning a language, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Smith S, Normahani P, Lane T, Hohenschurz-Schmidt D, Oliver N, Davies AHet al., 2022, Prevention and management strategies for diabetic neuropathy, Life, Vol: 12, Pages: 1185-1185, ISSN: 2075-1729

Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a common complication of diabetes that is becoming an increasing concern as the prevalence of diabetes rapidly rises. There are several types of DN, but the most prevalent and studied type is distal symmetrical polyneuropathy, which is the focus of this review and is simply referred to as DN. It can lead to a wide range of sensorimotor and psychosocial symptoms and is a major risk factor for diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuropathic osteoarthropathy, which are associated with high rates of lower limb amputation and mortality. The prevention and management of DN are thus critical, and clinical guidelines recommend several strategies for these based on the best available evidence. This article aims to provide a narrative review of DN prevention and management strategies by discussing these guidelines and the evidence that supports them. First, the epidemiology and diverse clinical manifestations of DN are summarized. Then, prevention strategies such as glycemic control, lifestyle modifications and footcare are discussed, as well as the importance of early diagnosis. Finally, neuropathic pain management strategies and promising novel therapies under investigation such as neuromodulation devices and nutraceuticals are reviewed.

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Unprecedented?, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Distaso W, Malik MMAH, Semere S, AlHakami A, Alexander EC, Hirani D, Shah RJ, Suba K, McKechnie V, Nikcevic A, Oliver N, Spada M, Salem Vet al., 2022, Diabetes self-management during the COVID-19 pandemic and its associations with COVID-19 anxiety syndrome, depression and health anxiety, Publisher: WILEY, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Smith S, Normahani P, Lane T, Hohenschurz-Schmidt D, Oliver N, Davies AHet al., 2022, Pathogenesis of distal symmetrical polyneuropathy in diabetes, Life, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-16, ISSN: 2075-1729

Distal symmetrical polyneuropathy (DSPN) is a serious complication of diabetes associated with significant disability and mortality. Although more than 50% of people with diabetes develop DSPN, its pathogenesis is still relatively unknown. This lack of understanding has limited the development of novel disease-modifying therapies and left the reasons for failed therapies uncertain, which is critical given that current management strategies often fail to achieve long-term efficacy. In this article, the pathogenesis of DSPN is reviewed, covering pathogenic changes in the peripheral nervous system, microvasculature and central nervous system (CNS). Furthermore, the successes and limitations of current therapies are discussed, and potential therapeutic targets are proposed. Recent findings on its pathogenesis have called the definition of DSPN into question and transformed the disease model, paving the way for new research prospects.

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Prevention, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Fallon C, Jones E, Oliver N, Reddy M, Avari Pet al., 2022, The impact of socio-economic deprivation on access to diabetes technology in adults with type 1 diabetes, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: A212-A212, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Zhu T, Uduku C, Li K, Herrero Vinas P, Oliver N, Georgiou Pet al., 2022, Enhancing self-management in type 1 diabetes with wearables and deep learning, npj Digital Medicine, Vol: 5, ISSN: 2398-6352

People living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) require lifelong selfmanagement to maintain glucose levels in a safe range. Failure to do socan lead to adverse glycemic events with short and long-term complications. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is widely used in T1Dself-management for real-time glucose measurements, while smartphoneapps are adopted as basic electronic diaries, data visualization tools, andsimple decision support tools for insulin dosing. Applying a mixed effectslogistic regression analysis to the outcomes of a six-week longitudinalstudy in 12 T1D adults using CGM and a clinically validated wearablesensor wristband (NCT ID: NCT03643692), we identified several significant associations between physiological measurements and hypo- andhyperglycemic events measured an hour later. We proceeded to developa new smartphone-based platform, ARISES (Adaptive, Real-time, and Intelligent System to Enhance Self-care), with an embedded deep learning algorithm utilizing multi-modal data from CGM, daily entries of mealand bolus insulin, and the sensor wristband to predict glucose levels andhypo- and hyperglycemia. For a 60-minute prediction horizon, the proposed algorithm achieved the average root mean square error (RMSE)of 35.28±5.77 mg/dL with the Matthews correlation coefficients fordetecting hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia of 0.56±0.07 and 0.70±0.05,respectively. The use of wristband data significantly reduced the RMSEby 2.25 mg/dL (p < 0.01). The well-trained model is implemented onthe ARISES app to provide real-time decision support. These resultsindicate that the ARISES has great potential to mitigate the risk ofsevere complications and enhance self-management for people with T1D.

Journal article

Akturk HK, Herrero P, Oliver N, Wise H, Eikermann E, Snell-Bergeon J, Shah VNet al., 2022, Impact of Different Types of Data Loss on Optimal Continuous Glucose Monitoring Sampling Duration, DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, ISSN: 1520-9156

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, It's complicated, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Al-Ozairi E, Reem AA, El Samad A, Taghadom E, Al-Kandari J, Abdul-Ghani M, Oliver N, Whitcher B, Guess Net al., 2022, A randomised crossover trial: Exploring the dose-response effect of carbohydrate restriction on glycaemia in people with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, JOURNAL OF HUMAN NUTRITION AND DIETETICS, ISSN: 0952-3871

Journal article

Herrero P, Reddy M, Georgiou P, Oliver NSet al., 2022, Identifying Continuous Glucose Monitoring Data Using Machine Learning, DIABETES TECHNOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS, Vol: 24, Pages: 403-408, ISSN: 1520-9156

Journal article

Elbalshy M, Haszard J, Smith H, Kuroko S, Galland B, Oliver N, Shah V, de Bock MI, Wheeler BJet al., 2022, Effect of divergent continuous glucose monitoring technologies on glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Diagnostic challenge, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Eng PC, Distaso W, Durreshahwar H, Shaikhali Y, Narendranathan D, Cassin-Scott R, Misra S, Hill NE, Tharakan G, Oliver NS, Tan TM, Izzi-Engbeaya C, Salem Vet al., 2022, The benefit of dexamethasone in patients with COVID-19 infection is preserved in patients with diabetes., Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism: a journal of pharmacology and therapeutics, Vol: 24, Pages: 1385-1389, ISSN: 1462-8902

Dexamethasone significantly reduces mortality1 and is now standard treatment for patients with COVID-19 who require supplemental oxygen and/or mechanical ventilation. However, supraphysiological doses of glucocorticoids may exacerbate dysglycaemia and precipitate hyperglycaemic complications, particularly in those with or at risk of Type 2 diabetes2. The RECOVERY trial1 reported a low incidence of hyperglycaemic complications (2/1996, 0.1%), although the real-world incidence is likely to be much higher3. Type 2 diabetes itself increases the risk of severe COVID-194, and hyperglycaemia independently predicts poor outcomes5. We investigated the possibility that patients with diabetes may derive less survival benefit from steroid therapy in the setting of severe COVID-19 infection

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Taking back control, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Clarke S, Phylactou M, Patel B, Mills E, Muzi B, Izzi-Engbeaya C, khoo B, Meeran M, Comninos A, Abbara A, Tan T, Oliver N, Dhillo Wet al., 2022, Preserved C-peptide in survivors of COVID-19: post-hoc analysis, Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism: a journal of pharmacology and therapeutics, Vol: 24, Pages: 570-574, ISSN: 1462-8902

Journal article

Bevan GT, Chew S, Godsland I, Oliver N, Hill Net al., 2022, A game for all shapes and sizes? Changes in anthropometric and performance measures of elite professional rugby union players 1999-2018, BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2055-7647

Background: Rugby union player size has increased since the game turned professional in 1995. Changes in physical and performance capability over this period have yet to be fully described.Hypothesis: Increases in player momentum would result from changes in body mass.Methods: Within-player rates of change in anthropometric and kinetic variables with season played were sampled in three successively studied professional rugby union club cohorts playing at the highest level of European competition between 1999-2019. Data comprised 910 seasons of observation for 291 elite male players. Most players had 2, 3 or 4 seasons of observation. Mixed-effects modelling distinguished changes independent of position played, club and international status.Results: With each season played, player body mass, fat-free mass, and maximum speed increased significantly, while percent fat decreased. The mean maximal velocity of a rugby player in 1999 was 8.2 (±0.18) m/s, which in 2019 had risen to 9.1 (±0.10) m/s. Player’s momentum in 2019 was 14% more than those playing in 1999. In the Front Five, momentum increased in this period by more than 25%, mainly driven by greater running speed, disproving our hypothesis.Conclusions: The momentum of players, particularly forwards, increased markedly over 20 seasons of professional rugby. The resulting forces generated in collisions are thus significantly greater, although these may be mitigated by better player conditioning. Proactive regulation to address player safety may be required to address the changing nature of anthropometric measures and physical performance, minimising injury rates and potential long-term sequelae.

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Variance of concern, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Aceves-Martins M, Quinton R, Brazzelli M, Cruickshank M, Manson P, Hudson J, Oliver N, Hernandez R, Aucott L, Wu F, Dhillo WS, Bhattacharya S, Gillies K, Jayasena CN, NIHR Testosterone Efficacy & Safety TestES Consortiumet al., 2022, Identifying the outcomes important to men with hypogonadism: A qualitative evidence synthesis, Andrology, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2047-2919

OBJECTIVE: Men with male hypogonadism (MH) experience sexual dysfunction, which improves with testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). However, randomised controlled trials provide little consensus on functional and behavioural symptoms in hypogonadal men; these are often better captured by qualitative information from individual patient experience. METHODS: We systematically searched major electronic databases to identify qualitative data from men with hypogonadism, with or without TRT. Two independent authors performed the selection, extraction, and thematic analysis of data. Quality of eligible studies was assessed using the Critical Appraisals Skills Programme and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation-Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research tools. RESULTS: We analysed data from five studies published in nine reports that assessed a total of 284 participants. Published data were only available within North America, with no ethnic minority or other underserved groups included. In addition to sexual dysfunction, men with MH experienced adverse changes in physical strength, perceptions of masculinity, cognitive function, and quality of life. The experience of MH appeared dependent on the source(s) of educational material. DISCUSSION: We propose a patient-centred approach to clinician interactions rather than focusing on discreet MH symptoms. Current evidence about the experience of MH is limited to North America and predominantly white ethnicity, which may not be broadly applicable to other geographic regions. Broadening our understanding of the MH experience may improve the targeting of information to patients. In addition, a multidisciplinary approach may better address symptoms neither attributable to MH nor alleviated by TRT.

Journal article

Oliver N, 2022, Baby Steps, DIABETIC MEDICINE, Vol: 39, ISSN: 0742-3071

Journal article

Armiger R, Reddy M, Oliver NS, Georgiou P, Herrero Pet al., 2022, An In Silico Head-to-Head Comparison of the Do-It-Yourself Artificial Pancreas Loop and Bio-Inspired Artificial Pancreas Control Algorithms., J Diabetes Sci Technol, Vol: 16, Pages: 29-39

BACKGROUND: User-developed automated insulin delivery systems, also referred to as do-it-yourself artificial pancreas systems (DIY APS), are in use by people living with type 1 diabetes. In this work, we evaluate, in silico, the DIY APS Loop control algorithm and compare it head-to-head with the bio-inspired artificial pancreas (BiAP) controller for which clinical data are available. METHODS: The Python version of the Loop control algorithm called PyLoopKit was employed for evaluation purposes. A Python-MATLAB interface was created to integrate PyLoopKit with the UVa-Padova simulator. Two configurations of BiAP (non-adaptive and adaptive) were evaluated. In addition, the Tandem Basal-IQ predictive low-glucose suspend was used as a baseline algorithm. Two scenarios with different levels of variability were used to challenge the algorithms on the adult (n = 10) and adolescent (n = 10) virtual cohorts of the simulator. RESULTS: Both BiAP and Loop improve, or maintain, glycemic control when compared with Basal-IQ. Under the scenario with lower variability, BiAP and Loop perform relatively similarly. However, BiAP, and in particular its adaptive configuration, outperformed Loop in the scenario with higher variability by increasing the percentage time in glucose target range 70-180 mg/dL (BiAP-Adaptive vs Loop vs Basal-IQ) (adults: 89.9% ± 3.2%* vs 79.5% ± 5.3%* vs 67.9% ± 8.3%; adolescents: 74.6 ± 9.5%* vs 53.0% ± 7.7% vs 55.4% ± 12.0%, where * indicates the significance of P < .05 calculated in sequential order) while maintaining the percentage time below range (adults: 0.89% ± 0.37% vs 1.72% ± 1.26% vs 3.41 ± 1.92%; adolescents: 2.87% ± 2.77% vs 4.90% ± 1.92% vs 4.17% ± 2.74%). CONCLUSIONS: Both Loop and BiAP algorithms are safe and improve glycemic control when compared, in silico, with Basal-IQ. However, BiAP appears significantly more robust to real-world challenges by outperformi

Journal article

Scott R, Oliver N, Thomas M, Agha-Jaffar Ret al., 2021, Pregnancy and contraception in women with Pre-Gestational diabetes in secondary Care- A questionnaire study, DIABETES RESEARCH AND CLINICAL PRACTICE, Vol: 182, ISSN: 0168-8227

Journal article

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