Imperial College London

DrOnesmusMwabonje

Faculty of Natural SciencesCentre for Environmental Policy

Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 9289o.mwabonje

 
 
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Location

 

403Weeks BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

12 results found

Mwabonje O, Black MJ, Borrion AL, Hillary AKet al., 2019, Life Cycle Assessment of biofuels and green commodity chemicals, Green Energy to Sustainability: Strategies for Global Industries, Editors: Vertes, Qureshi, Blaschek, Yukawa, Publisher: John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK., ISBN: 9781119152026

Book chapter

Ni Y, Mwabonje ON, Richter GM, Qi A, Yeung K, Patel M, Woods Jet al., 2019, Assessing availability and greenhouse gas emissions of lignocellulosic biomass feedstock supply - case study for a catchment in England, Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, Vol: 13, Pages: 568-581, ISSN: 1932-104X

Feedstocks from lignocellulosic biomass (LCB) include crop residues and dedicated perennial biomass crops. The latter are often considered superior in terms of climate change mitigation potential. Uncertainty remains over their availability as feedstocks for biomass provision and the net greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) during crop production. Our objective was to assess the optimal land allocation to wheat and Miscanthus in a specific case study located in England, to increase biomass availability, improve the carbon balance (and reduce the consequent GHG emissions), and minimally constrain grain production losses from wheat. Using soil and climate variables for a catchment in east England, biomass yields and direct nitrogen emissions were simulated with validated process‐based models. A ‘Field to up‐stream factory gate’ life‐cycle assessment was conducted to estimate indirect management‐related GHG emissions. Results show that feedstock supply from wheat straw can be supplemented beneficially with LCB from Miscanthus grown on selected low‐quality soils. In our study, 8% of the less productive arable land area was dedicated to Miscanthus, increasing total LCB provision by about 150%, with a 52% reduction in GHG emission per ton LCB delivered and only a minor effect on wheat grain production (−3%). In conclusion, even without considering the likely carbon sequestration in impoverished soils, agriculture should embrace the opportunities to provide the bioeconomy with LCB from dedicated, perennial crops.

Journal article

Chandra VV, Hemstock SL, Mwabonje ON, N'Yeurt ADR, Woods Jet al., 2018, Life cycle assessment of sugarcane growing process in Fiji, Sugar Tech, Vol: 20, Pages: 692-699, ISSN: 0972-1525

Sugarcane is an economically important crop in Fiji as it has considerable impact on the gross domestic product and around 22% (200,000) of the population is directly or indirectly dependent on the sugarcane industry. Considering the importance of this crop, a life cycle assessment (LCA) was performed in order to understand environmental impacts. In this paper, Fijian sugarcane production was assessed to produce a set of LCA results for defined impacts. The results can be used in subsequent assessments of sugarcane-related products and provide significant insights into the current impacts. Life cycle impact assessment results were generated using CML, ReCiPe and Impact 2002 + models running in Open LCA software using the Ecoinvent database. This connected the system flows and process flow to the product systems in order to calculate the life cycle impact assessment results to be based on local data for comparable and accurate evaluation. Previous analysis revealed that sugarcane production has a considerable impact on global warming potential because of the significant use of fossil fuels in farm machineries and transportation, and the production and use of agrochemicals. Results from this study show that sugarcane production has least impact on ozone layer depletion. Fertilizer production and usage was found to be one of the key issues affecting various impact categories. These results will assist further assessments on the sugarcane products and systems. However, in order to further develop the LCA tool for Fijian agricultural systems, development and testing of life cycle impact assessment models is necessary for Fijian conditions. This will ensure further accuracy of model outputs and supply more realistic and real-time results on emissions.

Journal article

Patel MK, Bechu A, Villegas JD, Bergez-Lacoste M, Yeung K, Murphy R, Woods J, Mwabonje O, Ni Y, Patel AD, Gallagher J, Bryant Det al., 2018, Second-generation bio-based plastics are becoming a reality – Non-renewable energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of succinic acidbased plastic end products made from lignocellulosic biomass, Biofuels, Bioproducts and Biorefining, Vol: 12, Pages: 426-441, ISSN: 1932-104X

Bio-based and bio-degradable plastics such as polybutylene succinate (PBS) have the potential to become sustainable alternatives to petrochemical-based plastics. Polybutylene succinate can be produced from bio-based succinic acid and 1,4-butanediol using first-generation (1G) or second-generation (2G) sugars. A cradle-to-grave environmental assessment was performed for PBS products in Europe to investigate the non-renewable energy use (NREU) and greenhouse gas (GHG) impacts. The products investigated are single-use trays and agricultural film, with incineration, industrial composting and degradation on agricultural land as end-of-life scenarios. Both end products manufactured from fully bio-based PBS and from partly bio-based PBS (made from bio-based succinic acid and fossil fuel-based 1,4 butanediol) were analysed. We examine corn (1G) as well as corn stover, wheat straw, miscanthus and hardwood as 2G feedstocks. For the cradle-to-grave system, 1G fully bio-based PBS plastic products were found to have environmental impacts comparable with their petrochemical incumbents, while 2G fully bio-based PBS plastic products allow to reduce NREU and GHG by around one third under the condition of avoidance of concentration of sugars and energy integration of the pretreatment process with monomer production. Without energy integration and with concentration of sugars (i.e., separate production), the impacts of 2G fully bio-based PBS products are approximately 15–20% lower than those of 1G fully bio-based PBS products. The environmental analysis of PBS products supports the value proposition related to PBS products while also pointing out areas requiring further research and development.

Journal article

Ni Y, Mwabonje O, Richter GM, Yeung K, Qi A, Woods J, Patel MKet al., Integrating Miscanthus into Arable System to Secure Sustainable Feedstock Supply for Lignocellulosic Succinic Acid Production, 25th European Biomass Conference and Exhibition (EUBCE)

Conference paper

Ni Y, Mwabonje O, Richter MR, Qi A, Yeung K, Woods Jet al., Assessing Availability and Environmental Impacts of Lignocellulosic Feedstock Supply - Case Study for a Catchment in England, International Bioenergy Conference and Exhibition (IBCE)

Conference paper

Wiltshire J, Mortimer N, Mwabonje O, Wynn Set al., Improving estimates of life cycle nitrous oxide emissions from crop based food products, 8th International Conference on LCA in the Agri-Food Sector

Conference paper

Mwabonje ON, Jiang J-Q, 2010, A Trial of Using Solvent Extraction for Phosphorus Recovery, Journal of Water Resource and Protection, Vol: 02, Pages: 830-838, ISSN: 1945-3094

Journal article

Jiang J-Q, Mwabonje O, 2009, Phosphorus Recovery by Liquid–Liquid Extraction, Separation Science and Technology, Vol: 44, Pages: 3258-3266, ISSN: 0149-6395

Journal article

Jiang JQ, Mwabonje O, Liquid-liquid Extraction process for Phosphorus Recovery, 11th International Conference on Environmental Science and Technology

Conference paper

Jiang JQ, Xu YL, Mwabonje O, 2008, Removing Algae with Electro-Coagulation Flotation, Ecological Management New Research, Publisher: Nova Science Pub Incorporated, ISBN: 9781604567861

This book presents the latest research in the field.

Book chapter

Mwabonje O, Jiang JQ, Phosphorus recovery with liquid-ion exchange for a small wastewater treatment system, IWA 7th Specialised Conference on Small Water and Wastewater Systems

Conference paper

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