Imperial College London

DrPeterBuckle

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Surgery & Cancer

Principal Research Fellow in Human Factors
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 1820p.buckle

 
 
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Location

 

1003Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
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162 results found

Tase A, Vadhwana B, Buckle P, Hanna GBet al., 2022, Usability challenges in the use of medical devices in the home environment: A systematic review of literatur, APPLIED ERGONOMICS, Vol: 103, ISSN: 0003-6870

Journal article

Kierkegaard P, Hicks T, Allen AJ, Yang Y, Hayward G, Glogowska M, Nicholson BD, Buckle P, CONDOR Steering Committeeet al., 2021, Strategies to implement SARS-CoV-2 point-of-care testing into primary care settings: a qualitative secondary analysis guided by the Behaviour Change Wheel., Implement Science Communications, Vol: 2, Pages: 1-20, ISSN: 2662-2211

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study is to develop a theory-driven understanding of the barriers and facilitators underpinning physicians' attitudes and capabilities to implementing SARS-CoV-2 point-of-care (POC) testing into primary care practices. METHODS: We used a secondary qualitative analysis approach to re-analyse data from a qualitative, interview study of 22 primary care physicians from 21 primary care practices across three regions in England. We followed the three-step method based on the Behaviour Change Wheel to identify the barriers to implementing SARS-CoV-2 POC testing and identified strategies to address these challenges. RESULTS: Several factors underpinned primary care physicians' attitudes and capabilities to implement SARS-CoV-2 POC testing into practice. First, limited knowledge of the SARS-CoV-2 POC testing landscape and a demanding workload affected physicians' willingness to use the tests. Second, there was scepticism about the insufficient evidence pertaining to the clinical efficacy and utility of POC tests, which affected physicians' confidence in the accuracy of tests. Third, physicians would adopt POC tests if they were prescribed and recommended by authorities. Fourth, physicians required professional education and training to increase their confidence in using POC tests but also suggested that healthcare assistants should administer the tests. Fifth, physicians expressed concerns about their limited workload capacity and that extra resources are needed to accommodate any anticipated changes. Sixth, information sharing across practices shaped perceptions of POC tests and the quality of information influenced physician perceptions. Seventh, financial incentives could motivate physicians and were also needed to cover the associated costs of testing. Eighth, physicians were worried that society will view primary care as an alternative to community testing centres, which would change perceptions around their professional identity. Ninth

Journal article

Ni M, Adam ME, Akbar F, Huddy JR, Borsci S, Buckle P, Rubulotta F, Carr R, Fotheringham I, Wilson C, Tsang M, Harding S, White N, Hanna GBet al., 2021, Development and validation of ester impregnated pH strips for locating nasogastric feeding tubes in the stomach-a multicentre prospective diagnostic performance study., Diagnostic and Prognostic Research, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 2397-7523

BACKGROUND: NG (nasogastric) tubes are used worldwide as a means to provide enteral nutrition. Testing the pH of tube aspirates prior to feeding is commonly used to verify tube location before feeding or medication. A pH at or lower than 5.5 was taken as evidence for stomach intubation. However, the existing standard pH strips lack sensitivity, especially in patients receiving feeding and antacids medication. We developed and validated a first-generation ester-impregnated pH strip test to improve the accuracy towards gastric placements in adult population receiving routine NG-tube feeding. The sensitivity was improved by its augmentation with the action of human gastric lipase (HGL), an enzyme specific to the stomach. METHODS: We carried out a multi-centred, prospective, two-gate diagnostic accuracy study on patients who require routine NG-tube feeding in 10 NHS hospitals comparing the sensitivity of the novel pH strip to the standard pH test, using either chest X-rays or, in its absence, clinical observation of the absence of adverse events as the reference standard. We also tested the novel pH strips in lung aspirates from patients undergoing oesophageal cancer surgeries using visual inspection as the reference standard. We simulated health economics using a decision analytic model and carried out adoption studies to understand its route to commercialisation. The primary end point is the sensitivity of novel and standard pH tests at the recommended pH cut-off of 5.5. RESULTS: A total of 6400 ester-impregnated pH strips were prepared based on an ISO13485 quality management system. A total of 376 gastric samples were collected from adult patients in 10 NHS hospitals who were receiving routine NG-tube feeding. The sensitivities of the standard and novel pH tests were respectively 49.2% (95% CI 44.1‑54.3%) and 70.2% (95% CI 65.6‑74.8%) under pH cut-off of 5.5 and the novel test has a lung specificity of 89.5% (95% CI 79.6%, 99.4%). Our simulation showed that using the

Journal article

Micocci M, Buckle P, Hayward G, Allen AJ, Davies K, Kierkegaard P, Spilsbury K, Thompson C, Astle A, Heath R, Sharpe C, Akrill C, Lasserson D, Perera R, Body R, Gordon ALet al., 2021, Point of care testing using rapid automated antigen testing for SARS-COV-2 in care homes - an exploratory safety, usability and diagnostic agreement evaluation, Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management, Vol: 26, Pages: 243-250, ISSN: 2516-0435

IntroductionSuccessful adoption of POCTs (Point-of-Care tests) for COVID-19 in care homes requires the identification of ideal use cases and a full understanding of the contextual and usability factors that affect test results and minimise biosafety risks. This paper presents a scoping-usability and test performance study of a microfluidic immunofluorescence assay for COVID-19 in care homes.MethodsA mixed-methods evaluation was conducted in four UK care homes to scope usability and to assess the agreement with qRT-PCR. A dry run with luminescent dye was conducted to explore biosafety issues.ResultsThe agreement analysis was conducted on 227 asymptomatic participants (159 staff and 68 residents) and 14 symptomatic participants (5 staff and 9 residents). Asymptomatic specimens showed 50% (95% CI:1.3%−98.7%) positive agreement and 96% (95% CI: 92.5%−98.1%) negative agreement with overall prevalence and bias-adjusted Kappa (PABAK) of 0.911 (95% CI: 0.857−0.965). Symptomatic specimens showed 83.3% (95% CI: 35.9%−99.6%) positive agreement and 100% (95% CI: 63.1%−100%) negative agreement with overall prevalence and bias-adjusted Kappa (PABAK) of 0.857 (95% CI: 0.549−1). The dry run highlighted four main sources of contamination that led to the modification of the standard operating procedures. Simulation post-modification showed no further evidence of contamination.ConclusionCareful consideration of biosafety issues and contextual factors associated with care home are mandatory for safe use the POCT. Whilst POCT may have some utility for ruling out COVID-19, further diagnostic accuracy evaluations are needed to promote effective adoption.

Journal article

Tulloch JSP, Micocci M, Buckle P, Lawrenson K, Kierkegaard P, McLister A, Gordon AL, Garcia-Finana M, Peddie S, Ashton M, Buchan I, Parvulescu Pet al., 2021, Enhanced lateral flow testing strategies in care homes are associated with poor adherence and were insufficient to prevent COVID-19 outbreaks: results from a mixed methods implementation study, Age and Ageing, Vol: 50, Pages: 1868-1875, ISSN: 0002-0729

IntroductionCare homes have been severely affected by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Rapid antigen testing could identify most SARS-CoV-2 infected staff and visitors before they enter homes. We explored implementation of staff and visitor testing protocols using lateral flow devices (LFDs).MethodsAn evaluation of a SARS-CoV-2 LFD-based testing protocol in 11 care homes in Liverpool, UK, including staff and visitor testing, plus a qualitative exploratory study in nine of these homes. The proportion of pilot homes with outbreaks, and outbreak size, were compared to non-pilot homes in Liverpool. Adherence to testing protocols was evaluated. Fifteen staff were interviewed, and transcript data were thematically coded using an iterative analysis to identify and categorize factors influencing testing implementation.ResultsIn total, 1,638 LFD rapid tests were performed on 407 staff. Protocol adherence was poor with 8.6% of staff achieving >75% protocol adherence, and 25.3% achieving ≥50%. Six care homes had outbreaks during the study. Compared to non-pilot care homes, there was no evidence of significant difference in the proportion of homes with outbreaks, or the size of outbreaks. Qualitative data showed difficulty implementing testing strategies due to excessive work burden. Factors influencing adherence related to test integration and procedural factors, socio-economic factors, cognitive overload and the emotional value of testing.ConclusionImplementation of staff and visitor care home LFD testing protocols was poorly adhered to and consequently did not reduce the number or scale of COVID-19 outbreaks. More focus is needed on the contextual and behavioural factors that influence protocol adherence.

Journal article

Kierkegaard P, Micocci M, McLister A, Tulloch JSP, Parvulescu P, Gordon AL, Buckle Pet al., 2021, Implementing lateral flow devices in long-term care facilities: experiences from the Liverpool COVID-19 community testing pilot in care homes- a qualitative study, BMC Health Services Research, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1472-6963

INTRODUCTION: Antigen-based lateral flow devices (LFDs) offer the potential of widespread rapid testing. The scientific literature has primarily focused on mathematical modelling of their use and test performance characteristics. For these tests to be implemented successfully, an understanding of the real-world contextual factors that allow them to be integrated into the workplace is vital. To address this gap in knowledge, we aimed to explore staff's experiences of integrating LFDs into routine practice for visitors and staff testing with a view to understand implementation facilitators and barriers. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews and thematic analysis. RESULTS: We identified two main themes and five subthemes. The main themes included: visitor-related testing factors and staff-related testing factors. Subthemes included: restoring a sense of normality, visitor-related testing challenges, staff-related testing challenges, and pre-pilot antecedent factors. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrates that the real-world implementation of LFDs to test visitors and staff faces significant challenges as a result of several contextual factors negatively affecting the work practice and environment. More comprehensive studies are needed to identify and inform effective implementation strategies to ensure that LFDs can be adopted in an agile way that better supports an already exhausted and morally depleted workforce.

Journal article

Buckle P, Micocci M, Tulloch J, Kierkegaard P, Parvulescu P, Thompson C, Spilsbury K, Allen AJ, Body R, Hayward G, Buchan I, Gordon ALet al., 2021, COVID-19 point-of-care testing in care homes: what are the lessons for policy and practice?, Age and Ageing, Vol: 50, Pages: 1442-1444, ISSN: 0002-0729

COVID-19 has devastated care homes. Point-of-care tests (POCTs), mainly using lateral flow devices (LFDs), have been deployed hurriedly without much consideration of their usability or impact on care workflow. Even after the pandemic, POCTs, particularly multiplex tests, may be an important control against spread of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory infections in care homes by enabling identification of cases. They should not, however, replace other infection control measures such as barrier methods and quarantine. Adherence to LFDs as implemented among care home staff is suboptimal. Other tests-such as point-of-care polymerase chain reaction and automated antigen tests-would also need to be accommodated into care home workflows to improve adherence. The up-front costs of POCTs are straightforward but additional costs, including staffing preparation and reporting processes and the impacts of false positive and negative tests on absence rates and infection days, are more complex and as yet unquantified. A detailed appraisal is needed as the future of testing in care homes is considered.

Journal article

Micocci M, Borsci S, Thakerar V, Walne S, Manshadi Y, Edridge F, Mullarkey D, Buckle P, Hanna GBet al., 2021, Attitudes towards trusting artificial intelligence insights and factors to prevent the passive adherence of GPs: a pilot study, Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-11, ISSN: 2077-0383

Artificial Intelligence (AI) systems could improve system efficiency by supporting clinicians in making appropriate referrals. However, they are imperfect by nature and misdiagnoses, if not correctly identified, can have consequences for patient care. In this paper, findings from an online survey are presented to understand the aptitude of GPs (n = 50) in appropriately trusting or not trusting the output of a fictitious AI-based decision support tool when assessing skin lesions, and to identify which individual characteristics could make GPs less prone to adhere to erroneous diagnostics results. The findings suggest that, when the AI was correct, the GPs’ ability to correctly diagnose a skin lesion significantly improved after receiving correct AI information, from 73.6% to 86.8% (X2 (1, N = 50) = 21.787, p < 0.001), with significant effects for both the benign (X2 (1, N = 50) = 21, p < 0.001) and malignant cases (X2 (1, N = 50) = 4.654, p = 0.031). However, when the AI provided erroneous information, only 10% of the GPs were able to correctly disagree with the indication of the AI in terms of diagnosis (d-AIW M: 0.12, SD: 0.37), and only 14% of participants were able to correctly decide the management plan despite the AI insights (d-AIW M:0.12, SD: 0.32). The analysis of the difference between groups in terms of individual characteristics suggested that GPs with domain knowledge in dermatology were better at rejecting the wrong insights from AI. View Full-Text

Journal article

Tase A, Buckle P, Ni MZ, Hanna GBet al., 2021, Medical device error and failure reporting: Learning from the car industry, Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management, Vol: 26, Pages: 135-141, ISSN: 2516-0435

BackgroundImproving the design of technology relies in part, on the reporting of performance failures in existing devices. Healthcare has low levels of formal reporting of performance and failure of medical equipment. This paper examines methods of reporting in the car industry and healthcare and aims to understand differences and identify opportunities for improvement within healthcare.MethodsA literature search was carried out in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Engineering Village, Scopus. NHS England and MHRA publications and guidelines were also reviewed. Focus was placed on the current system of reporting in both industries, known degree of patient harm, initiating factors, barriers, quality and methods of incident investigation and their validity. The findings were used to compare error reporting system in the two industries.ResultsDerivation of healthcare incident data from different sources means the full extent of patient harm is not known. For example, in 2012 there were 13,549 and 38,395 incidents reported by MHRA and NRLS (National Reporting and Learning System) respectively leading to uncertainties on the extent of the problem. The car industry emphasises the role of reporting source in ensuring data quality. Utilising some aspects of this approach might benefit healthcare reporting. These include a specific reporting system that stresses the importance of organisational learning in improving safety and recognises the limitations of root cause analysis.ConclusionsLearning from reporting systems within the car industry may help the healthcare sector improve its own reporting, aiding healthcare performance.

Journal article

Micocci M, gordon A, Allen J, Hicks T, Kierkegaard P, McLister A, Walne S, Hayward G, Buckle Pet al., 2021, COVID-19 testing in English care homes and implications for staff and residents, Age and Ageing, Vol: 50, Pages: 668-672, ISSN: 0002-0729

IntroductionCare home residents are at high risk of dying from COVID-19. Regular testing, producing rapid and reliable results is important in this population because infections spread quickly, and presentations are often atypical or asymptomatic. This study evaluated current testing pathways in care homes to explore the role of point-of-care tests (POCTs).Methods:Ten staff from eight care homes, purposively sampled to reflect care organisational attributes that influence outbreak severity, underwent a semi-structured remote videoconference interview. Transcripts were analysed using process mapping tools and framework analysis focussing on perceptions about, gaps within, and needs arising from, current pathways.Results:Four main steps were identified in testing: infection prevention, preparatory steps, swabbing procedure, and management of residents. Infection prevention was particularly challenging for mobile residents with cognitive impairment. Swabbing and preparatory steps were resource-intensive, requiring additional staff resource. Swabbing required flexibility and staff who were familiar to the resident. Frequent approaches to residents were needed to ensure they would participate at a suitable time. After-test management varied between sites. Several homes reported deviating from government guidance to take more cautious approaches, which they perceived to be more robust. Conclusion:Swab-based testing is organisationally complex and resource-intensive in care homes. It needs to be flexible to meet the needs of residents and provide care homes with rapid information to support care decisions. POCT could help address gaps but the complexity of the setting means that each technology must be evaluated in context before widespread adoption in care homes.

Journal article

Micocci M, Gordon AL, Seo MK, Allen AJ, Davies K, Lasserson D, Thompson C, Spilsbury K, Akrill C, Heath R, Astle A, Sharpe C, Perera R, Hayward G, Buckle Pet al., 2021, Is point-of-care testing feasible and safe in care homes in England? An exploratory usability and accuracy evaluation of a point-of-care polymerase chain reaction test for SARS-CoV-2, Age and Ageing, Vol: 50, Pages: 1464-1472, ISSN: 0002-0729

IntroductionReliable rapid testing for COVID-19 is needed in care homes to reduce the risk of outbreaks and enable timely care. This study aimed to examine the usability and test performance of a point of care polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for detection of SARS-CoV-2 (POCKITTM Central) in care homes.MethodsPOCKITTM Central was evaluated in a purposeful sample of four UK care homes. Test agreement with laboratory real-time PCR and usability and used errors were assessed.ResultsNo significant usability-related hazards emerged, and the sources of error identified were found to be amendable with minor changes in training or test workflow. POCKITTM Central has acceptable sensitivity and specificity based on RT-PCR as the reference standard, especially for symptomatic cases.Asymptomatic specimens showed 83.3% (95% confidence interval (CI): 35.9–99.6%) positive agreement and 98.7% negative agreement (95% CI: 96.2–99.7%), with overall prevalence and bias-adjusted kappa (PABAK) of 0.965 (95% CI: 0.932– 0.999). Symptomatic specimens showed 100% (95% CI: 2.5–100%) positive agreement and 100% negative agreement (95% CI: 85.8–100%), with overall PABAK of 1.Recommendations are provided to mitigate the frequency of occurrence of the residual use errors observed. Integration pathways were discussed to identify opportunities and limitations of adopting POCKIT™ Central for screening and diagnostic testing purposes.ConclusionsPoint-of-care PCR testing in care homes can be considered with appropriate preparatory steps and safeguards. Further diagnostic accuracy evaluations and in-service evaluation studies should be conducted, if the test is to be implemented more widely, to build greater certainty on this initial exploratory analysis.

Journal article

Kierkegaard P, McLister A, Buckle P, 2021, Rapid point-of-care testing for COVID-19: quality of supportive information for lateral flow serology assays, BMJ Open, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2044-6055

Objective There is a lack of evidence addressing several important human factors questions pertaining to the quality of supportive information provided by commercial manufacturers that can affect the adoption and use of lateral flow serology assays in practice. We aimed to: (1) identify and assess the quality of information that commercial manufacturers provided for their point-of-care tests (POCTs) and (2) examine the implications of these findings on real-world settings.Design We used a content analysis methodology in two stages to systematically, code and analyse textual data from documents of commercial manufacturers. A deductive approach was applied using a coding guide based on the validated Point-of-Care Key Evidence Tool (POCKET) multidimensional checklist. An inductive approach was used to identify new patterns or themes generated from our textual analysis.Setting Publicly available supportive information documents by commercial manufacturers for lateral flow serology, were identified and gathered from online searches.Participants Supportive information documents retrieved from online searches over 3 months (March 2020 to June 2020).Results A total of 79 POCTs were identified that met the study inclusion criteria. Using the POCKET coding guide, we found that the quality of information varied significantly between the manufacturers and was often lacking in detail. Our inductive approach further examined these topics and found that several statements were vague and that significant variations in the level of details existed between manufacturers.Conclusions This study revealed significant concerns surrounding the supportive information reported by manufacturers for lateral flow serology assays. Information transparency was poor and human factor issues were not properly addressed to mitigate the risk of improper device use, although it should be noted that the results of our study are limited by the data that manufactures were prepared to disclose. Over

Journal article

Wu AW, Buckle P, Haut ER, Bellandi T, Koizumi S, Mair A, Øvretveit J, Power C, Sax H, Thomas EJ, Newman-Toker D, Vincent Cet al., 2020, Supporting the emotional well-being of health care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic, Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management, Vol: 25, Pages: 93-96, ISSN: 2516-0435

Journal article

Ni M, Borsci S, Walne S, Mclister AP, Buckle P, Barlow JG, Hanna GBet al., 2020, The Lean and Agile Multi-dimensional Process (LAMP) - a new framework for rapid and iterative evidence generation to support health-care technology design and development, Expert Review of Medical Devices, Vol: 17, Pages: 277-288, ISSN: 1743-4440

Introduction: Health technology assessments (HTA) are tools for policymaking and resource allocation. Early HTAs are increasingly used in design and development of new technologies. Conducting early HTAs is challenging, due to a lack of evidence and significant uncertainties in the technology and the market. A multi-disciplinary approach is considered essential. However, an operational framework that can enable the integration of multi-dimensional evidence into commercialization remains lacking.Areas covered: We developed the Lean and Agile Multi-dimensional Process (LAMP), an early HTA framework, for embedding commercial decision-making in structured evidence generation activities, divided into phases. Diverse evidence in unmet needs, user acceptance, cost-effectiveness, and market competitiveness are being generated in increasing depth. This supports the emergence of design and value propositions that align technology capabilities and clinical and user needs.Expert opinion: We have been applying LAMP to working with medical device and diagnostic industry in the UK. The framework can be adapted to suit different technologies, decision needs, time scales, and resources. LAMP offers a practical solution to the multi-disciplinary approach. Methodologists drive the process by performing evidence generation and synthesis as and by enabling interactions between manufacturers, designers, clinicians, and other key stakeholders.

Journal article

Wu AW, Bellandi T, Buckle P, Francis R, Haut ER, Kachalia A, Mair A, Øvretveit J, Power C, Pronovost PJ, Sax H, Shapiro DW, Thomas EJ, Newman-Toker D, Vincent Cet al., 2019, Patient safety pearls, Journal of Patient Safety and Risk Management, Vol: 24, Pages: 221-223, ISSN: 2516-0435

As 2019 draws to a close, the Journal of Patient Safetyand Risk Management has reached a milestone for anew academic publishing enterprise: we have completed our first two full volumes. These are made up of 12issues of research, case studies, descriptions of programs and policy, and related scholarship, on patientsafety and medicolegal risk.In the Northern Hemisphere, we are approachingthe winter solstice and the longest nights of the year.Also at hand are the corresponding festivities whichoriginally must have been intended at least in part toward off the dark and cold.To observe the season, we offer gifts of wisdom onpatient safety and health care quality, nominated byour editors and international editorial board.In medicine, these bon mots are sometimes referredto as “pearls.” Although a few are freshly minted, mostare venerable. As a rule, their origin is obscure. One ofour members described his offerings as grains of sandrather than pearls, suggesting their potential to irritatemore than enlighten. But over the years they have beenrepeated, paraphrased and repackaged on the wards bycountless clinicians, much like nursery rhymes reinvented on the playground by generations of smallchildren.

Journal article

Borsci S, Buckle P, Walne S, Salanitri Det al., 2019, Trust and Human Factors in the Design of Healthcare Technology, 20th Congress of the International-Ergonomics-Association (IEA), Publisher: SPRINGER INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING AG, Pages: 218-226, ISSN: 2194-5357

Conference paper

Borsci S, Uchegbu I, Buckle P, Ni Z, Walne S, Hanna GBet al., 2017, Designing medical technology for resilience: Integrating health economics and human factors approaches, Expert Review of Medical Devices, Vol: 15, Pages: 15-26, ISSN: 1743-4440

INTRODUCTION: The slow adoption of innovation into healthcare calls into question the manner of evidence generation for medical technology. This paper identifies potential reasons for this including a lack of attention to human factors, poor evaluation of economic benefits, lack of understanding of the existing healthcare system and a failure to recognise the need to generate resilient products. Areas covered. Recognising a cross-disciplinary need to enhance evidence generation early in a technology's life cycle, the present paper proposes a new approach that integrates human factors and health economic evaluation as part of a wider systems approach to the design of technology. This approach (Human and Economic Resilience Design for Medical Technology or HERD MedTech) supports early stages of product development and is based on the recent experiences of the National Institute for Health Research London Diagnostic Evidence Co-operative in the UK. Expert commentary. HERD MedTech i) proposes a shift from design for usability to design for resilience, ii) aspires to reduce the need for service adaptation to technological constraints iii) ensures value of innovation at the time of product development, and iv) aims to stimulate discussion around the integration of pre- and post-market methods of assessment of medical technology.

Journal article

Borsci S, Buckle P, Huddy J, Alaestante Z, Ni Z, hanna GBet al., 2017, Usability study of pH strips for nasogastric tube placement, PLoS ONE, Vol: 12, Pages: 1-14, ISSN: 1932-6203

Aims(1) To model the process of use and usability of pH strips (2) to identify, through simulation studies, the likelihood of misreading pH strips, and to assess professional’s acceptance, trust and perceived usability of pH strips.MethodsThis study was undertaken in four phases and used a mixed method approach (an audit, a semi-structured interview, a survey and simulation study). The three months audit was of 24 patients, the semi-structured interview was performed with 19 health professionals and informed the process of use of pH strips. A survey of 134 professionals and novices explored the likelihood of misinterpreting pH strips. Standardised questionnaires were used to assess professionals perceived usability, trust and acceptance of pH strip use in a simulated study.ResultsThe audit found that in 45.7% of the cases aspiration could not be achieved, and that 54% of the NG-tube insertions required x-ray confirmation. None of those interviewed had received formal training on pH strips use. In the simulated study, participants made up to 11.15% errors in reading the strips with important implications for decision making regarding NG tube placement. No difference was identified between professionals and novices in their likelihood of misinterpreting the pH value of the strips. Whilst the overall experience of usage is poor (47.3%), health professionals gave a positive level of trust in both the interview (62.6%) and the survey (68.7%) and acceptance (interview group 65.1%, survey group 74.7%). They also reported anxiety in the use of strips (interview group 29.7%, survey group 49.7%).ConclusionsSignificant errors occur when using pH strips in a simulated study. Manufacturers should consider developing new pH strips, specifically designed for bedside use, that are more usable and less likely to be misread.

Journal article

Borsci S, Buckle P, Uchegbu I, Ni Z, Walne S, Hanna Get al., 2017, Integrating human factors and health economics to inform the design of medical device: a conceptual framework, EMBEC & NBC 2017: Joint Conference of the European Medical and Biological Engineering Conference (EMBEC) and the Nordic-Baltic Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Medical Physics (NBC)

Conference paper

Borsci S, Buckle P, Hanna GB, 2016, Why you need to include human factors in clinical and empirical studies of in vitro point of care devices? Review and future perspectives, Expert Review of Medical Devices, Vol: 13, Pages: 405-416, ISSN: 1745-2422

Use of in-vitro point of care devices - intended as tests performed out of laboratories and near patient - is increasing in clinical environments. International standards indicate that interaction assessment should not end after the product release, yet human factors methods are frequently not included in clinical and empirical studies of these devices. Whilst the literature confirms some advantages of bed-side tests compared to those in laboratories there is a lack of knowledge of the risks associated with their use. This article provides a review of approaches applied by clinical researchers to model the use of in-vitro testing. Results suggest that only a few studies have explored human factor approaches. Furthermore, when researchers investigated people-device interaction these were predominantly limited to qualitative and not standardised approaches. The methodological failings and limitations of these studies, identified by us, demonstrate the growing need to integrate human factors methods in the medical field.

Journal article

Lim RHM, Anderson JE, Buckle PW, 2015, Work domain analysis for understanding medication safety in care homes in England: an exploratory study, Ergonomics, Vol: 59, Pages: 15-26, ISSN: 1366-5847

Medication safety and errors are a major concern in care homes. In addition to the identification of incidents, there is a need for a comprehensive system description to avoid the danger of introducing interventions that have unintended consequences and are therefore unsustainable. The aim of this study was to explore the impact and uniqueness of Work Domain Analysis (WDA) to facilitate an in-depth understanding of medication safety problems within the care home system and identify the potential benefits of WDA to design safety interventions to improve medication safety. A comprehensive, systematic and contextual overview of the care home medication system was developed for the first time. The novel use of the abstraction hierarchy (AH) to analyse medication errors revealed the value of the AH to guide a comprehensive analysis of errors and generate system improvement recommendations that took into account the contextual information of the wider system.

Journal article

Hettinger LJ, Kirlik A, Goh YM, Buckle Pet al., 2015, Modelling and simulation of complex sociotechnical systems: envisioning and analysing work environments, ERGONOMICS, Vol: 58, Pages: 600-614, ISSN: 0014-0139

Journal article

Atkin R, Buckle P, Myerson J, 2015, Street works and vision impairment: improving signing and guarding, PROCEEDINGS OF THE INSTITUTION OF CIVIL ENGINEERS-MUNICIPAL ENGINEER, Vol: 168, Pages: 11-23, ISSN: 0965-0903

Journal article

Hignett S, Jones EL, Miller D, Wolf L, Modi C, Shahzad MW, Buckle P, Banerjee J, Catchpole Ket al., 2015, Human factors and ergonomics and quality improvement science: integrating approaches for safety in healthcare, BMJ Quality and Safety, Vol: 24, Pages: 250-254, ISSN: 2044-5415

Journal article

Hignett S, Miller D, Wolf L, Jones E, Buckle P, Catchpole Ket al., 2015, What is the relationship between human factors &amp; ergonomics and quality improvement in healthcare?, Pages: 213-219

A recent initiative in the National Health Service (NHS, UK) has led to an increased interest in Human Factors & Ergonomics (HFE). As part of initial discussions there have been questions about the similarities and differences between HFE and Quality Improvement (QI).We believe that there are considerable advantages from a more structured relationship between HFE and QI in healthcare and have comparatively mapped a range of dimensions (origins, drivers, philosophy, focus, role and methods). Our conclusion is that HFE in healthcare should use four criteria to maximise the benefits from this opportunity, including the use of HFE methods to design systems, environments, products etc. and the direct involvement of qualified (chartered) HFE professionals.

Conference paper

Buckle P, 2015, Human factors that influence the performance of telecare, Pages: 201-204

Systems approaches and their relevance to the design and to the risk assessment of technology for telecare have been investigated. We have examined risk in five contexts namely: Assessment of telecare need and equipment provision; Installation of equipment; Review of client needs; Client use of telecare; Monitoring and Response. The results provide important areas of systems failures that have impact across the many stakeholders involved in the provision of telecare. The opportunities for improving design and are presented.

Conference paper

Hignett S, Carayon P, Buckle P, Catchpole Ket al., 2013, State of science: human factors and ergonomics in healthcare, ERGONOMICS, Vol: 56, Pages: 1491-1503, ISSN: 0014-0139

Journal article

Flin R, Bromiley M, Buckle P, Reid Jet al., 2013, MID STAFFS INQUIRY Changing behaviour with a human factors approach, BMJ-BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, Vol: 346, ISSN: 1756-1833

Journal article

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