Imperial College London

Professor Peter GJ Burney MA MD FRCP FFPHM FMedSci

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Emeritus Professor of Respiratory Epidemiology
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7941p.burney

 
 
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Location

 

07Emmanuel Kaye BuildingRoyal Brompton Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

541 results found

Binegdie AB, Brenac S, Devereux G, Meme H, EL Sony A, Gebremariam TH, Osman R, Miheso B, Mungai B, Zurba L, Lesosky M, Balmes J, Burney PJ, Mortimer Ket al., 2022, Post-TB lung disease in three African countries, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE, Vol: 26, Pages: 891-893, ISSN: 1027-3719

Journal article

Ratanachina J, Amaral A, De Matteis S, Lawin H, Mortimer K, Obaseki D, Harrabi I, Denguezli M, Wouters E, Janson C, Nielsen R, Gulsvik A, Cherkaski H, Mejza F, Anand M, Elsony A, Ahmed R, Tan W, Loh LC, Rashid A, Studnicka M, Nafees A, Seemungal T, Aquart-Stewart A, Al Ghobain M, Zheng J, Juvekar S, Salvi S, Jogi R, Mannino D, Gislason T, Buist AS, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2022, Association of respiratory symptoms and lung function with occupation in the multinational Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study, European Respiratory Journal, ISSN: 0903-1936

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has been associated with exposures in the workplace. We aimed to assess the association of respiratory symptoms and lung function with occupation in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study.We analysed cross-sectional data from 28,823 adults (≥40years) in 34 countries. Eleven occupations were considered and grouped by likelihood of exposure to organic dusts, inorganic dusts and fumes. The association of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, wheeze, dyspnoea, FEV1/FVC and FVC with occupation was assessed, per study site, using multivariable regression. These estimates were then meta-analysed. Sensitivity analyses explored differences between sexes and gross national income (GNI).Overall, working in settings with potentially high exposure to dusts or fumes was associated with respiratory symptoms but not lung function differences. The most common occupation was farming. Compared to people not working in any of the 11 considered occupations, those who were farmers for ≥20years were more likely to have chronic cough (OR=1.52, 95%CI 1.19-1.94), wheeze (OR=1.37, 95%CI 1.16-1.63), and dyspnoea (OR=1.83, 95%CI 1.53-2.20), but not lower FVC (β=0.02L, 95%CI -0.02L to 0.06L) or lower FEV1/FVC (β=0.04%, 95%CI -0.49% to 0.58%). Some findings differed by sex and GNI. In summary, at a population level, the occupational exposures considered in this study do not appear to be major determinants of differences in lung function, although they associate with more respiratory symptoms. As not all work settings were included in this study, respiratory surveillance should still be encouraged among high-risk dusty and fume job workers, especially in low- and middle-income countries.

Journal article

Hsan S, Lakhdar N, Harrabi I, Zaouali M, Burney P, Denguezli Met al., 2022, Reduced forced vital capacity is independently associated with, aging, height and a poor socioeconomic status: a report from the Tunisian population-based BOLD study, BMC PULMONARY MEDICINE, Vol: 22, ISSN: 1471-2466

Journal article

Denguezli M, Lakhdar N, Harrabi I, Amaral A, Burney Pet al., 2022, UNDIAGNOSED COPD IN ADULTS 40 YEARS AND OLDER: REPORTS FROM THE TUNISIAN POPULATION-BASED BURDEN OF OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE STUDY, Publisher: ELSEVIER, Pages: 363A-363A, ISSN: 0012-3692

Conference paper

Knox-Brown B, Amaral A, Burney P, 2022, Concerns about PRISm, The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, Vol: 10, Pages: e51-e52, ISSN: 2213-2600

Journal article

Burney P, 2022, Genetic ancestry has the same major problems as phenotypic ancestry, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 206, Pages: 797-798, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Binegdie AB, Haile T, Worku A, Kebede E, Meme H, El Sony A, Zurba LJ, Lesosky M, Balmes JR, Burney P, Devereux G, Mortimer KJet al., 2022, Chronic Respiratory Diseases in Ethiopia: Risk Factors and Determinants of Pulmonary Function Impairment. Hospital Based Cross-Sectional Study, Publisher: AMER THORACIC SOC, ISSN: 1073-449X

Conference paper

Nafees A, De Matteis S, Amaral A, Burney P, Cullinan Pet al., 2022, Impact of using different predictive equations on the prevalence of chronic byssinosis in textile workers in Pakistan, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol: 79, Pages: 242-244, ISSN: 1351-0711

Objective Byssinosis remains a significant problem among textile workers in low/middle-income countries. Here we share our experience of using different prediction equations for assessing ‘chronic’ byssinosis according to the standard WHO classification using measurements of forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1).Methods We enrolled 1910 workers in a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve the health of textile workers in Pakistan. We included in analyses the 1724 (90%) men who performed pre-bronchodilator spirometry tests of acceptable quality. We compared four different equations for deriving lung function percentage predicted values among those with symptoms-based byssinosis: the third US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES-III, with ‘North Indian and Pakistani’ conversion factor); the Global Lung Function Initiative (GLI, ‘other or mixed ethnicities’); a recent equation derived from survey of a western Indian population; and one based on an older and smaller survey of Karachi residents.Results 58 men (3.4%) had symptoms-based byssinosis according to WHO criteria. Of these, the proportions with a reduced FEV1 (<80% predicted) identified using NHANES and GLI; Indian and Pakistani reference equations were 40%, 41%, 14% and 12%, respectively. Much of this variation was eliminated when we substituted FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio (<lower limit of normality) as a measure of airway obstruction.Conclusion Accurate measures of occupational disease frequency and distribution require approaches that are both standardised and meaningful. We should reconsider the WHO definition of ‘chronic’ byssinosis based on changes in FEV1, and instead use the FEV1/FVC.

Journal article

Kulbacka-Ortiz K, Triest F, Franssen F, Wouters E, Studnicka M, Vollmer W, Lamprecht B, Burney P, Amaral A, Vanfleteren Let al., 2022, Restricted spirometry and cardiometabolic comorbidities: Results from the international population based BOLD study, Respiratory Research, Vol: 23, ISSN: 1465-9921

Background:Whether restricted spirometry, i.e. low Forced Vital Capacity (FVC), predicts chronic cardiometabolic disease is not definitely known. In this international population-based study, we assessed the relationship between restricted spirometry and cardiometabolic comorbidities.Methods:A total of 23,623 subjects (47.5% males, 19.0% current smokers, age: 55.1 ± 10.8 years) from five continents (33 sites in 29 countries) participating in the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study were included. Restricted spirometry was defined as post-bronchodilator FVC < 5th percentile of reference values. Self-reports of physician-diagnosed cardiovascular disease (CVD; heart disease or stroke), hypertension, and diabetes were obtained through questionnaires.Results:Overall 31.7% of participants had restricted spirometry. However, prevalence of restricted spirometry varied approximately ten-fold, and was lowest (8.5%) in Vancouver (Canada) and highest in Sri Lanka (81.3%). Crude odds ratios for the association with restricted spirometry were 1.60 (95% CI 1.37–1.86) for CVD, 1.53 (95% CI 1.40–1.66) for hypertension, and 1.98 (95% CI 1.71–2.29) for diabetes. After adjustment for age, sex, education, Body Mass Index (BMI) and smoking, the odds ratios were 1.54 (95% CI 1.33–1.79) for CVD, 1.50 (95% CI 1.39–1.63) for hypertension, and 1.86 (95% CI 1.59–2.17) for diabetes.Conclusion:In this population-based, international, multi-site study, restricted spirometry associates with cardiometabolic diseases. The magnitude of these associations appears unattenuated when cardiometabolic risk factors are taken into account.

Journal article

Nafees AA, De Matteis S, Burney P, Cullinan Pet al., 2022, Contemporary prevalence of byssinosis in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review, Asia-Pacific Journal of Public Health, Vol: 34, Pages: 483-492, ISSN: 1010-5395

We aimed to identify the contemporary prevalence of byssinosis through a systematic review. We used Medline, Web of Science, Embase, and Global Health databases to identify studies published in any language between 2000 and 2019, reporting primary data on byssinosis among adults. We used the Joanna Briggs Institute checklist to estimate the risk of bias in studies and undertook a qualitative, narrative data analysis. The review considered the prevalence of byssinosis, chest tightness, and airflow obstruction in textile workers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). We found 26 relevant studies that included 6930 workers across 12 countries. Most of the studies (n = 19) were from Asia, and 7 from African countries. Twenty-five studies were cross-sectional surveys while 1 was a cohort study. The prevalence of byssinosis was reported by 18 studies, and ranged from 8% to 38%, without any clear associations, at the group level, between the prevalence of byssinosis and durations of workers’ exposures. Prevalence of chest tightness ranged between 4% and 58% and that of airflow obstruction between 10% and 30%. We found a strong correlation (r = 0.72) between prevalence of byssinosis and cotton dust levels. Our findings indicate that byssinosis remains a significant, contemporary problem in some parts of the textile sector in LMICs.

Journal article

Binegdie AB, Meme H, El Sony A, Haile T, Osman R, Miheso B, Zurba L, Lesosky M, Balmes J, Burney PJ, Mortimer K, Devereux Get al., 2022, Chronic respiratory disease in adult outpatients in three African countries: a cross-sectional study, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE, Vol: 26, Pages: 18-+, ISSN: 1027-3719

Journal article

Amaral A, Burney P, Patel J, Minelli C, Mejza F, Mannino D, Seemungal T, Padukudru Anand M, Loh LC, Janson C, Juvekar S, Denguezli M, Harrabi I, Wouters E, Cherkaski H, Mortimer K, Jogi R, Bateman E, Fuertes E, Al Ghobain M, Tan W, Obaseki D, El Sony A, Studnicka M, Aquart-Stewart A, Koul P, Lawin H, Nafees A, Awopeju O, Erhabor G, Gislason T, Welte T, Gulsvik A, Nielsen R, Gnatiuc L, Kocabas A, Marks G, Sooronbaev T, Mbatchou Ngahane B, Barbara C, Buist ASet al., 2021, Chronic airflow obstruction and ambient particulate air pollution, Thorax, Vol: 76, Pages: 1236-1241, ISSN: 0040-6376

Smoking is the most well-established cause of chronic airflow obstruction (CAO) but particulate air pollution and poverty have also been implicated. We regressed sex-specific prevalence of CAO from 41 Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study sites against smoking prevalence from the same study, the gross national income per capita and the local annual mean level of ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) using negative binomial regression. The prevalence of CAO was not independently associated with PM2.5 but was strongly associated with smoking and was also associated with poverty. Strengthening tobacco control and improved understanding of the link between CAO and poverty should be prioritised.

Journal article

Nafees AA, Iqbal AR, Cullinan P, Matteis SD, Burney P, Semple Set al., 2021, Use of low-cost particle counters for cotton dust exposure assessment in textile mills in low- and middle-income countries, Annals of Work Exposures and Health, Vol: 66, ISSN: 2398-7308

OBJECTIVE: There is a lack of consensus on methods for cotton dust measurement in the textile industry, and techniques vary between countries-relying mostly on cumbersome, traditional approaches. We undertook comparisons of standard, gravimetric methods with low-cost optical particle counters for personal and area dust measurements in textile mills in Pakistan. METHODS: We included male textile workers from the weaving sections of seven cotton mills in Karachi. We used the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) sampler with a Casella Apex 2 standard pump and the Purple Air (PA-II-SD) for measuring personal exposures to inhalable airborne particles (n = 31). We used the Dylos DC1700 particle counter, in addition to the two above, for area-level measurements (n = 29). RESULTS: There were no significant correlations between the IOM and PA for personal dust measurements using the original (r = -0.15, P = 0.4) or log-transformed data (r = -0.32, P = 0.07). Similarly, there were no significant correlations when comparing the IOM with either of the particle counters (PA and Dylos) for area dust measurements, using the original (r = -0.07, P = 0.7; r = 0.10, P = 0.6) or log-transformed data (r = -0.09, P = 0.6; r = 0.07, P = 0.7). CONCLUSION: Our findings show a lack of correlation between the gravimetric method and the use of particle counters in both personal and area measurements of cotton dust, precluding their use for measuring occupational exposures to airborne dust in textile mills. There continues to be a need to develop low-cost instruments to help textile industries in low- and middle-income countries to perform cotton dust exposure assessment.

Journal article

Marcon A, Locatelli F, Dharmage SC, Svanes C, Heinrich J, Leynaert B, Burney P, Corsico A, Caliskan G, Calciano L, Gislason T, Janson C, Jarvis D, Jogi R, Lytras T, Malinovschi A, Probst-Hensch N, Toren K, Casas L, Verlato G, Garcia-Aymerich J, Accordini Set al., 2021, The coexistence of asthma and COPD: risk factors, clinical history and lung function trajectories, EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY JOURNAL, Vol: 58, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Njoroge MW, Mjojo P, Chirwa C, Rylance S, Nightingale R, Gordon SB, Mortimer K, Burney P, Balmes J, Rylance J, Obasi A, Niessen LW, Devereux Get al., 2021, Changing lung function and associated health-related quality-of-life: A five-year cohort study of Malawian adults, ECLINICALMEDICINE, Vol: 41

Journal article

Patel J, Amaral AFS, Minelli C, Elfadaly FG, Burney Pet al., 2021, Poverty and chronic airflow obstruction in the multinational Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) study: An update, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Denguezli M, Daldoul H, Lakhdar N, Amaral A, Burney Pet al., 2021, Undiagnosed COPD in adults 40 years and older: Reports from the Tunisian Population-Based Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease Study, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Bagkeris E, Mulhern O, Amaral A, Burney Pet al., 2021, Forced Vital Capacity and Mortality in The BOLD Study: Preliminary Findings, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Bagkeris E, Patel J, Janson C, Amaral A, Burney Pet al., 2021, Forced Vital Capacity and Quality of Life: BOLD Study Cross-Sectional Analysis, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Mulhern O, Algharbi F, Amaral AFS, Burney Pet al., 2021, Association of asthma diagnosis with chronic airflow obstruction: a multi-site cross-sectional study, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Tan WC, Li P, Choi R, Bourbeau J, Aaron S, Leung C, Maltais F, Hernandez P, Chapman K, Walker B, Marciniuk D, O'Donnell D, Hogg J, Road J, Fitzgerald M, Amaral A, Vollmer W, Burney P, Buist S, Sin Det al., 2021, The population risk attribution associated with chronic airway obstruction from the results of the Canadian Obstructive Lung Disease study, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Ratanachina J, Amaral A, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2021, Farming, pesticide exposure and respiratory health: a cross-sectional study in Thailand, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol: 79, ISSN: 1351-0711

Objective: To assess the association of lung function and respiratory symptoms with farming, particularly pesticide use, in an agricultural province in Thailand.Methods: We undertook a cross-sectional survey of adults aged 40–65 in Nan province, Thailand, between May and August 2019. We randomly recruited 345 villagers and enriched the sample with 82 government employees. All participants performed post-bronchodilator spirometry and completed a questionnaire covering information on respiratory symptoms, farming activities, pesticide use and known risk factors for respiratory disease. Associations of respiratory outcomes with farming and pesticide exposures were examined by multivariable regression analysis.Results: The response rate was 94%. The prevalence of chronic airflow obstruction among villagers was 5.5%. Villagers had, on average, a lower percent predicted post-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second/forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC) than government employees (98.3% vs 100.3%; p=0.04). There was no evidence of association of lung function with farming activities, the use of specific herbicides (glyphosate and paraquat), insecticides (organophosphates and pyrethroids) or fungicides. The exceptions were poultry farming, associated with chronic cough and an increase of FEV1/FVC, and atrazine, for which duration (p-trend <0.01), intensity (p-trend <0.01) and cumulative hours (p-trend=0.01) of use were all associated with higher FEV1/FVC in an exposure–response manner. Cumulative hours (−280 mL/hour), low duration (−270 mL/year) and intensity (−270 mL/hour/year) of atrazine use were associated with lower FVC.Conclusions: Chronic airflow obstruction is uncommon among villagers of an agricultural province in Nan, Thailand. Farming and pesticide use are unlikely to be major causes of respiratory problems there.

Journal article

Burney P, Patel J, Minelli C, Gnatiuc L, Amaral A, Kocabas A, Cherkaski H, Gulsvik A, Nielsen R, Bateman E, Jithoo A, Mortimer K, Sooronbaev T, Lawin H, Nejjari C, Elbiaze M, El Rhazi K, Zheng J-P, Ran P, Welte T, Obaseki D, Erhabor G, Elsony A, Osman N, Ahmed R, Nizankowska -Mogilnicka E, Mejza F, Mannino D, Barbara C, Wouters E, Idolor L, Loh L-C, Rashid A, Juvekar S, Gislason T, Al Ghobain M, Studnicka M, Harrabi I, Denguezli M, Koul P, Jenkins C, Marks G, Jogi R, Hafizi H, Janson C, Tan W, Aquart-Stewart A, Mbatchou B, Nafees A, Gunasekera K, Seemungal T, Mahesh PA, Enright P, Vollmer W, Blangiardo M, Elfadaly F, Buist ASet al., 2021, Prevalence and population attributable risk for chronic airflow obstruction in a large multinational study, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 203, Pages: 1353-1365, ISSN: 1073-449X

Rationale: The Global Burden of Disease programme identified smoking, and ambient and household air pollution as the main drivers of death and disability from Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Objective: To estimate the attributable risk of chronic airflow obstruction (CAO), a quantifiable characteristic of COPD, due to several risk factors. Methods: The Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study is a cross-sectional study of adults, aged≥40, in a globally distributed sample of 41 urban and rural sites. Based on data from 28,459 participants, we estimated the prevalence of CAO, defined as a post-bronchodilator one-second forced expiratory volume to forced vital capacity ratio < lower limit of normal, and the relative risks associated with different risk factors. Local RR were estimated using a Bayesian hierarchical model borrowing information from across sites. From these RR and the prevalence of risk factors, we estimated local Population Attributable Risks (PAR). Measurements and Main Results: Mean prevalence of CAO was 11.2% in men and 8.6% in women. Mean PAR for smoking was 5.1% in men and 2.2% in women. The next most influential risk factors were poor education levels, working in a dusty job for ≥10 years, low body mass index (BMI), and a history of tuberculosis. The risk of CAO attributable to the different risk factors varied across sites. Conclusions: While smoking remains the most important risk factor for CAO, in some areas poor education, low BMI and passive smoking are of greater importance. Dusty occupations and tuberculosis are important risk factors at some sites.

Journal article

Charles D, Gethings LA, Potts JF, Burney PGJ, Garcia-Larsen Vet al., 2021, Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics for the discovery of candidate markers of flavonoid and polyphenolic intake in adults, Scientific Reports, Vol: 11, ISSN: 2045-2322

Robust biological markers of dietary exposure are essential in improving the understanding of the link between diet and health outcomes. Polyphenolic compounds, including flavonoids, have been proposed to mitigate the risk of chronic diseases where oxidative stress and inflammation play a central role. Biomarkers can provide objective measurement of the levels of polyphenolic compounds. In this study, we provide methodology to identify potential candidate markers of polyphenol intake in human serum. Seventeen participants from the UK arm of the Global Allergy and Asthma Network of Excellence (GA2LEN) had their dietary intake estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire, and serum samples were assessed using mass spectrometry to identify potential candidate markers. 144 features were assigned identities, of these we identified four biologically relevant compounds (rhamnazin 3-rutinoside, 2-galloyl-1,4-galactarolactone methyl ester, 2″,32″-di-O-p-coumaroylafzelin and cyclocommunin), which were significantly increased in the serum of participants with high predicted level of fruit and vegetable intake. 2-galloyl-1,4-galactarolactone methyl ester was strongly correlated with total flavonoids (r = 0.62; P = 0.005), flavan-3-ols (r = 0.67; P = 0.002) as well as with other four subclasses. Rhamnazin 3-rutinoside showed strong correlation with pro-anthocyanidins (r = 0.68; P = 0.001), flavones (r = 0.62; P = 0.005). Our results suggest that serum profiling for these compounds might be an effective way of establishing the relative intake of flavonoids and could contribute to improve the accuracy of epidemiological methods to ascertain flavonoid intake.

Journal article

Ratanachina J, Amaral AFS, De Matteis S, Cullinan P, Burney Pet al., 2021, OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURES AND RESPIRATORY HEALTH: THE BURDEN OF OBSTRUCTIVE LUNG DISEASE (BOLD) STUDY RESULTS, Publisher: BMJ PUBLISHING GROUP, Pages: A2-A2, ISSN: 0040-6376

Conference paper

Nafees AA, Rabbani U, Razzaq S, Minai K, Khan MA, Naeem S, Fatmi Z, Burney Pet al., 2021, Indoor air quality and its relationship with cluster type in urban Pakistani households, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE, Vol: 25, Pages: 113-+, ISSN: 1027-3719

Journal article

Akhter Z, Razzaq S, Rabbani U, Irfan M, Burney P, Nafees AAet al., 2021, Prevalence of and risk factors for respiratory symptoms in an adult urban population, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG DISEASE, Vol: 25, Pages: 16-+, ISSN: 1027-3719

Journal article

Njoroge MW, Rylance S, Nightingale R, Gordon S, Mortimer K, Burney P, Rylance J, Obasi A, Niessen L, Devereux Get al., 2020, Cohort profile: The Chikwawa lung health cohort; a population-based observational non-communicable respiratory disease study of adults in Malawi, PLOS ONE, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

Lyons SA, Knulst AC, Burney PGJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ballmer-Weber BK, Barreales L, Bieli C, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kummeling I, Mustakov TB, van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Potts J, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Mills ENC, van Ree R, Thuy-My Let al., 2020, Predictors of Food Sensitization in Children and Adults Across Europe, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 8, Pages: 3074-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Lyons SA, Knulst AC, Burney PGJ, Fernandez-Rivas M, Ballmer-Weber BK, Barreales L, Bieli C, Clausen M, Dubakiene R, Fernandez-Perez C, Jedrzejczak-Czechowicz M, Kowalski ML, Kummeling I, Kralimarkova T, Mustakov TB, van Os-Medendorp H, Papadopoulos NG, Popov TA, Potts J, Versteeg SA, Xepapadaki P, Welsing PMJ, Mills C, van Ree R, Le T-Met al., 2020, Predicting food allergy: The value of patient history reinforced, ALLERGY, Vol: 76, Pages: 1454-1462, ISSN: 0105-4538

Journal article

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