Imperial College London

Professor Paul M. Matthews

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Edmond and Lily Safra Chair. Head of Department
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2855p.matthews

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Siobhan Dillon +44 (0)20 7594 2855

 
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Location

 

E502Burlington DanesHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@inbook{Matthews:2016:10.1007/978-1-4939-5611-1_26,
author = {Matthews, PM},
booktitle = {Neuromethods},
doi = {10.1007/978-1-4939-5611-1_26},
pages = {817--831},
title = {Pharmacological applications of fMRI},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-5611-1_26},
year = {2016}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - CHAP
AB - © Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016. Increasing societal expectations for new drugs, lack of confidence in short-term endpoints related to long- term outcomes for chronic neurological and psychiatric diseases and rising costs of development in an increasing cost-constrained market all have created a sense of crisis in CNS drug development. New approaches are needed. For some time, the potential of clinical functional imaging for more confident progression from preclinical to clinical development stages has been recognized. Pharmacological functional MRI (fMRI), which refers specifically to applications of fMRI to questions in drug development, provides one set of these tools. With related structural MRI measures, relatively high resolution data concerning target, disease-relevant pathophysiology and effects of therapeutic interventions can be related to brain functional anatomy. In this chapter, current and potential applications of pharmacological fMRI for target validation, patient stratification and characterization of therapeutic molecule pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics are reviewed. Challenges to better realizing the promise of pharmacological fMRI will be discussed. The review concludes that there is a strong rationale for greater use of pharmacological fMRI particularly for early phase studies, but also outlines the need for preclinical and early clinical development to be more seamlessly integrated, for greater harmonization of clinical imaging methodologies and for sharing of data to facilitate these goals.
AU - Matthews,PM
DO - 10.1007/978-1-4939-5611-1_26
EP - 831
PY - 2016///
SP - 817
TI - Pharmacological applications of fMRI
T1 - Neuromethods
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-1-4939-5611-1_26
ER -