Imperial College London

Professor Paul M. Matthews

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Edmond and Lily Safra Chair. Head of Department
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 2855p.matthews

 
 
//

Assistant

 

Ms Siobhan Dillon +44 (0)20 7594 2855

 
//

Location

 

E502Burlington DanesHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Citation

BibTex format

@inbook{Narayanan:2011:10.1017/CBO9781139023986.015,
author = {Narayanan, S and Caramanos, Z and Matthews, PM and Arnold, DL},
booktitle = {Multiple Sclerosis Therapeutics, Fourth Edition},
doi = {10.1017/CBO9781139023986.015},
pages = {150--164},
title = {Axonal pathology in patients with multiple sclerosis: Evidence from in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy},
url = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139023986.015},
year = {2011}
}

RIS format (EndNote, RefMan)

TY  - CHAP
AB - © Cambridge University Press 2011. Introduction The clinical course of multiple sclerosis (MS) is highly variable, and pathological changes that are seen with the disease are heterogeneous amongst individuals. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) approaches to characterizing the pathological substrates of disability in MS with the objective of developing quantitative in vivo indices of pathology that could provide new insights into the pathogenesis of the disease, as well as provide more specific or sensitive end-points for treatment trials. This chapter reviews results from studies that have used either proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS, a technique that allows for the acquisition of 1H-MR spectra from single voxels) or 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI, a technique that allows for the simultaneous acquisition of 1H-MR spectra from multiple voxels) to measure in vivo chemical pathology associated with impairment of axonal metabolic or structural integrity, and places these results in the context of relevant histopathological investigations. We will focus on an important hypothesis that has developed from these studies: that axonal pathology is central to the final common pathway leading to the progressive disability that is seen in individuals with this disease.
AU - Narayanan,S
AU - Caramanos,Z
AU - Matthews,PM
AU - Arnold,DL
DO - 10.1017/CBO9781139023986.015
EP - 164
PY - 2011///
SN - 9780521766272
SP - 150
TI - Axonal pathology in patients with multiple sclerosis: Evidence from in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy
T1 - Multiple Sclerosis Therapeutics, Fourth Edition
UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1017/CBO9781139023986.015
ER -