Imperial College London

DrPhilipMolyneaux

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Clinical Senior Lecturer in Interstitial Lung Disease
 
 
 
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p.molyneaux

 
 
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Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

96 results found

Kreuter M, Lee JS, Tzouvelekis A, Oldham JM, Molyneaux PL, Weycker D, Atwood M, Kirchgaessler K-U, Maher TMet al., 2021, Monocyte Count as a Prognostic Biomarker in Patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Myall KJ, Mukherjee B, Castanheira AM, Lam JL, Benedetti G, Mak SM, Preston R, Thillai M, Dewar A, Molyneaux PL, West AGet al., 2021, Persistent Post-COVID-19 Inflammatory Interstitial Lung Disease: An Observational Study of Corticosteroid Treatment, Annals of the American Thoracic Society, ISSN: 2329-6933

Journal article

Stock CJW, Hoyles RK, Daccord C, Kokosi M, Visca D, De Lauretis A, Alfieri V, Kouranos V, Margaritopoulos G, George PM, Molyneaux PL, Chua F, Maher TM, Abraham DJ, Ong V, Donovan J, Sestini P, Denton CP, Wells AU, Renzoni EAet al., 2020, Serum markers of pulmonary epithelial damage in systemic sclerosis-associated interstitial lung disease and disease progression, RESPIROLOGY, ISSN: 1323-7799

Journal article

Leavy OC, Ma S-F, Molyneaux PL, Maher TM, Oldham JM, Flores C, Noth I, Jenkins RG, Dudbridge F, Wain LV, Allen RJet al., 2020, Proportion of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Risk Explained by Known Common Genetic Loci in European Populations, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Hirani N, MacKinnon AC, Nicol L, Ford P, Schambye H, Pedersen A, Nilsson UJ, Leffler H, Sethi T, Tantawi S, Gavelle L, Slack RJ, Mills R, Karmakar U, Humphries D, Zetterberg F, Keeling L, Paul L, Molyneaux PL, Li F, Funston W, Forrest IA, Simpson AJ, Gibbons MA, Maher TMet al., 2020, Target-inhibition of galectin-3 by inhaled TD139 in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis., European Respiratory Journal, ISSN: 0903-1936

Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a pro-fibrotic β-galactoside-binding lectin that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and IPF exacerbations. TD139 is a novel and potent small molecule inhibitor of Gal-3.A randomised, double-blind, multi-centre, placebo-controlled, phase I/IIa study was conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of inhaled TD139 in 36 healthy subjects and 24 patients with IPF (NCT02257177). Six dose cohorts of six healthy subjects were evaluated (4:2 TD139:placebo ratio) with single doses of TD139 (0.15 mg to 50 mg) and three dose cohorts of eight patients with IPF (5:3 TD139:placebo ratio) with once daily doses of TD139 (0.3 mg to 10 mg) for 14 days.Inhaled TD139 was well tolerated with no significant treatment-related side effects. TD139 was rapidly absorbed, with mean Tmax values ranging from 0.6 h to 3 h and a T½ of 8 h. The concentration of TD139 in the lung was >567-fold higher than in the blood, with systemic exposure predicting exposure in the target compartment. Gal-3 expression on alveolar macrophages was reduced in the 3 mg and 10 mg dose groups compared to placebo, with a concentration-dependent inhibition demonstrated. Inhibition of Gal-3 expression in the lung was associated with reductions in plasma biomarkers centrally relevant to IPF pathobiology (PDGF-BB, PAI-1, Gal-3, CCL18 and YKL-40).TD139 is safe and well tolerated in healthy subjects and IPF patients. It was shown to suppress Gal-3 expression on BAL macrophages and, in a concerted fashion, decrease plasma biomarkers associated with IPF progression.

Journal article

Ogger PP, Albers GJ, Hewitt RJ, O'Sullivan BJ, Powell JE, Calamita E, Ghai P, Walker SA, McErlean P, Saunders P, Kingston S, Molyneaux PL, Halket JM, Gray R, Chambers DC, Maher TM, Lloyd CM, Byrne AJet al., 2020, Itaconate controls the severity of pulmonary fibrosis, Science Immunology, Vol: 5, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 2470-9468

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a fatal lung disease in which airway macrophages (AMs) play a key role. Itaconate has emerged as a mediator of macrophage function, but its role during fibrosis is unknown. Here, we reveal that itaconate is an endogenous antifibrotic factor in the lung. Itaconate levels are reduced in bronchoalveolar lavage, and itaconate-synthesizing cis-aconitate decarboxylase expression (ACOD1) is reduced in AMs from patients with IPF compared with controls. In the murine bleomycin model of pulmonary fibrosis, Acod1-/- mice develop persistent fibrosis, unlike wild-type (WT) littermates. Profibrotic gene expression is increased in Acod1-/- tissue-resident AMs compared with WT, and adoptive transfer of WT monocyte-recruited AMs rescued mice from disease phenotype. Culture of lung fibroblasts with itaconate decreased proliferation and wound healing capacity, and inhaled itaconate was protective in mice in vivo. Collectively, these data identify itaconate as critical for controlling the severity of lung fibrosis, and targeting this pathway may be a viable therapeutic strategy.

Journal article

Drake TM, Docherty AB, Harrison EM, Quint JK, Adamali H, Agnew S, Babu S, Barber CM, Barratt S, Bendstrup E, Bianchi S, Castillo Villegas D, Chaudhuri N, Chua F, Coker R, Chang W, Crawshaw A, Crowley LE, Dosanjh D, Fiddler CA, Forrest IA, George PM, Gibbons MA, Groom K, Haney S, Hart SP, Heiden E, Henry M, Ho L-P, Hoyles RK, Hutchinson J, Hurley K, Jones MG, Jones S, Kokosi M, Kreuter M, Mackay LS, Mahendran S, Margaritopoulos G, Molina-Molina M, Molyneaux PL, O'Brien A, O'Reilly K, Packham A, Parfrey H, Poletti V, Porter JC, Renzoni E, Rivera-Ortega P, Russell A-M, Saini G, Spencer LG, Stella GM, Stone H, Sturney S, Thickett D, Thillai M, Wallis T, Ward K, Wells AU, West A, Wickremasinghe M, Woodhead F, Hearson G, Howard L, Baillie JK, Openshaw PJM, Semple MG, Stewart I, Jenkins RG, ISARIC4C Investigatorset al., 2020, Outcome of hospitalization for COVID-19 in patients with interstitial lung disease: an international multicenter study., American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: The impact of COVID-19 on patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD) has not been established. OBJECTIVES: To assess outcomes in patients with ILD hospitalized for COVID-19 versus those without ILD in a contemporaneous age, sex and comorbidity matched population. METHODS: An international multicenter audit of patients with a prior diagnosis of ILD admitted to hospital with COVID-19 between 1 March and 1 May 2020 was undertaken and compared with patients, without ILD obtained from the ISARIC 4C cohort, admitted with COVID-19 over the same period. The primary outcome was survival. Secondary analysis distinguished IPF from non-IPF ILD and used lung function to determine the greatest risks of death. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Data from 349 patients with ILD across Europe were included, of whom 161 were admitted to hospital with laboratory or clinical evidence of COVID-19 and eligible for propensity-score matching. Overall mortality was 49% (79/161) in patients with ILD with COVID-19. After matching ILD patients with COVID-19 had higher mortality (HR 1.60, Confidence Intervals 1.17-2.18 p=0.003) compared with age, sex and co-morbidity matched controls without ILD. Patients with a Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) of <80% had an increased risk of death versus patients with FVC ≥80% (HR 1.72, 1.05-2.83). Furthermore, obese patients with ILD had an elevated risk of death (HR 2.27, 1.39-3.71). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ILD are at increased risk of death from COVID-19, particularly those with poor lung function and obesity. Stringent precautions should be taken to avoid COVID-19 in patients with ILD. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Journal article

Stock CJ, Conti C, Montero-Fernandez Á, Caramori G, Molyneaux PL, George PM, Kokosi M, Kouranos V, Maher TM, Chua F, Rice A, Denton CP, Nicholson AG, Wells A, Sestini P, Renzoni EAet al., 2020, Interaction between the promoter MUC5B polymorphism and mucin expression: is there a difference according to ILD subtype?, Thorax, Vol: 75, Pages: 901-903, ISSN: 0040-6376

The MUC5B promoter variant rs35705950 is associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). MUC5B glycoprotein is overexpressed in IPF lungs. We examined immunohistochemical expression of MUC5B in different interstitial lung disease patterns according to rs35705950 T-allele carriage. We observed increased expression of MUC5B in T-allele carriers in both distal airways and honeycomb cysts in patients with IPF (n=23), but no difference in MUC5B expression according to T-carrier status in the distal airways of patients with idiopathic non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (n=17), in scleroderma-associated non-specific interstitial pneumonitis (n=15) or in control lungs (n=20), suggesting that tissue overexpression in MUC5B rs35705950 T-carriers is specific to IPF.

Journal article

Zhang YZ, Brambilla C, Molyneaux PL, Rice A, Robertus JL, Jordan S, Lim E, Lang-Lazdunski L, Begum S, Dusmet M, Anikin V, Beddow E, Finch J, Asadi N, Popat S, Le Quesne J, Husain AN, Cookson WO, Moffatt MF, Nicholson AGet al., 2020, Presence of pleomorphic features but not growth patterns improves prognostic stratification of epithelioid malignant pleural mesothelioma by 2-tier nuclear grade, Histopathology, Vol: 77, Pages: 423-436, ISSN: 0309-0167

AIMS: Nuclear grade has been recently validated as a powerful prognostic tool in epithelioid malignant pleural mesothelioma (E-MPM). In other studies histological parameters including pleomorphic features and growth patterns were also shown to exert prognostic impact. The primary aims of our study are (1) externally validate the prognostic role of pleomorphic features in E-MPM and (2) investigate if evaluating growth pattern in addition to 2-tier nuclear grade improves prognostication. METHODS AND RESULTS: 614 consecutive cases of E-MPM from our institution over a period of 15 years were retrospectively reviewed, of which 51 showed pleomorphic features. E-MPM with pleomorphic features showed significantly worse overall survival compared those without (5.4 months vs 14.7 months). Tumours with predominantly micropapillary pattern showed the worst survival (6.2 months) followed by solid (10.5 months), microcystic (15.3 months), discohesive (16.1 months), trabecular (17.6 months) and tubulo-papillary (18.6 months). Sub-classification of growth patterns into high grade (solid, micropapillary) and low grade (all others) led to good separation of overall survival (10.5 months vs. 18.0 months) but did not predict survival independent of 2-tier nuclear grade. A composite score comprised of growth pattern and 2-tier nuclear grade did not improve prognostication compared with nuclear grade alone. Intra-tumoural heterogeneity in growth patterns is ubiquitous. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support the incorporation of E-MPM with pleomorphic features in the epithelioid subtype as a highly aggressive variant distinct from 2-tier nuclear grade. E-MPM demonstrates extensive heterogeneity in growth pattern but its evaluation does not offer additional prognostic utility to 2-tier nuclear grade.

Journal article

George PM, Spagnolo P, Kreuter M, Altinisik G, Bonifazi M, Martinez FJ, Molyneaux PL, Renzoni EA, Richeldi L, Tomassetti S, Valenzuela C, Vancheri C, Varone F, Cottin V, Costabel U, Erice ILD working groupet al., 2020, Progressive fibrosing interstitial lung disease: clinical uncertainties, consensus recommendations, and research priorities., The Lancet Respiratory Medicine, Vol: 8, Pages: 925-934, ISSN: 2213-2600

Within the spectrum of fibrosing interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) is a subset of patients who have inexorable progression of pulmonary fibrosis despite treatment, which is known as the progressive fibrotic phenotype. Although the concept of progressive fibrosing ILD has been applied largely to patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), there is now an increasing focus on irreversible progressive fibrosis in a proportion of patients with a range of underlying ILD diagnoses. Evidence has emerged to support a possible role for antifibrotic therapy in these patients. In this Position Paper, we discuss the importance of retaining diagnostic scrutiny within the multidisciplinary team and suggest a multidomain definition for progressive fibrosis. We consider the potential role of antifibrotic drugs as second-line therapy in the treatment algorithm for patients with progressive non-IPF ILD. We highlight risk factors that might predispose individuals to developing progressive fibrosis. Finally, we discuss key uncertainties and future directions for research and clinical practice.

Journal article

Molyneaux PL, Smith JJ, Saunders P, Chua F, Wells AU, Renzoni EA, Nicholson AG, Fahy WA, Jenkins RG, Maher TMet al., 2020, Bronchoalveolar lavage is safe and well tolerated in individuals with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: an analysis of the PROFILE study, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, ISSN: 1073-449X

Journal article

Leavy OC, Ma S-F, Molyneaux PL, Maher TM, Oldham JM, Flores C, Noth I, Jenkins RG, Dudbridge F, Wain LV, Allen RJet al., 2020, Proportion of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis risk explained by known genetic loci, Publisher: medRxiv

Genome-wide association studies have identified 14 genetic loci associated with susceptibility to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a devastating lung disease with poor prognosis. Of these, the variant with the strongest association, rs35705950, is located in the promoter region of the MUC5B gene and has a risk allele (T) frequency of 30-35% in IPF cases. Here we present estimates of the proportion of disease liability explained by each of the 14 IPF risk variants as well as estimates of the proportion of cases that can be attributed to each variant. We estimate that rs35705950 explains 5.9-9.4% of disease liability, which is much lower than previously reported estimates. Of every 100,000 individuals with the rs35705950_GG genotype we estimate 30 will have IPF, whereas for every 100,000 individuals with the rs35705950_GT genotype 152 will have IPF. Quantifying the impact of genetic risk factors on disease liability improves our understanding of the underlying genetic architecture of IPF and provides insight into the impact of genetic factors in risk prediction modelling.

Working paper

Invernizzi R, Wu BG, Barnett J, Ghai P, Kingston S, Hewitt RJ, Feary J, Li Y, Chua F, Wu Z, Wells AU, George PM, Renzoni E, Nicholson AG, Rice A, Devaraj A, Segal LN, Byrne AJ, Maher TM, Lloyd CM, Molyneaux PLet al., 2020, The Respiratory Microbiome in Chronic Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis is Distinct from that of Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis., Am J Respir Crit Care Med

RATIONALE: Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP) is a condition that arises following repeated exposure and sensitisation to inhaled antigens. The lung microbiome is increasingly implicated in respiratory disease but to date, no study has investigated the composition of microbial communities in the lower airways in CHP. OBJECTIVE: To characterise and compare the airway microbiome in subjects with CHP, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. METHODS: We prospectively recruited individuals diagnosed with CHP (n=110), IPF (n=45) and controls (n=28). Subjects underwent bronchoalveolar lavage and bacterial DNA was isolated, quantified by qPCR and the 16S rRNA gene was sequenced to characterise the bacterial communities in the lower airways. MAIN MEASUREMENTS AND RESULTS: Distinct differences in the microbial profiles were evident in the lower airways of subjects with CHP and IPF. At the phylum level, the prevailing microbiota of both IPF and CHP subjects included Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria. However, in IPF, Firmicutes dominated while the percentage of reads assigned to Proteobacteria in the same group was significantly lower compared to CHP subjects. At the genus level, Staphylococcus was increased in CHP and Actinomyces and Veillonella in IPF. The lower airway bacterial burden in CHP subjects was higher than controls but lower than those with IPF. In contrast to IPF, there was no association between bacterial burden and survival in CHP. CONCLUSIONS: The microbial profile of the lower airways in subjects with CHP is distinct from that of IPF and, notably, bacterial burden in individuals with CHP fails to predict survival. This article is open access and distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives License 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

Journal article

Invernizzi R, Lloyd CM, Molyneaux PL, 2020, Respiratory microbiome and epithelial interactions shape immunity in the lungs, Immunology, Vol: 160, Pages: 171-182, ISSN: 0019-2805

The airway epithelium represents a physical barrier to the external environment acting as the first line of defence against potentially harmful environmental stimuli including microbes and allergens. However, lung epithelial cells are increasingly recognised as active effectors of microbial defence, contributing to both innate and adaptive immune function in the lower respiratory tract. These cells express an ample repertoire of pattern-recognition receptors with specificity for conserved microbial and host motifs. Modern molecular techniques have uncovered the complexity of the lower respiratory tract microbiome. The interaction between the microbiota and the airway epithelium is key to understanding how stable immune homeostasis is maintained. Loss of epithelial integrity following exposure to infection can result in the onset of inflammation in susceptible individuals and may culminate in lung disease. Here we discuss the current knowledge regarding the molecular and cellular mechanisms by which the pulmonary epithelium interacts with the lung microbiome in shaping immunity in the lung. Specifically, we focus on the interactions between the lung microbiome and the cells of the conducting airways in modulating immune cell regulation and how defects in barrier structure and function may culminate in lung disease. Understanding these interactions is fundamental in the search for more effective therapies for respiratory diseases.

Journal article

Barnes H, Morisset J, Molyneaux P, Westall G, Glaspole I, Collard HR, CHP Exposure Assessment Collaboratorset al., 2020, A systematically derived exposure assessment instrument for Chronic Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis, Chest, Vol: 157, Pages: 1506-1512, ISSN: 0012-3692

BACKGROUND: Chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis (CHP) is an immune mediated interstitial lung disease, caused by inhalational exposure to environmental antigens, resulting in parenchymal fibrosis. By definition, a diagnosis of CHP assumes a history of antigen exposure, but only half of all patients eventually diagnosed with CHP will have a causative antigen identified. Individual clinician variation in eliciting a history of antigen exposure may affect the frequency and confidence of CHP diagnosis. METHODS: A list of potential causative exposures were derived from a systematic review of the literature. A Delphi method was applied to an international panel of ILD experts, to obtain consensus regarding technique for the elicitation of exposure to antigens relevant to a diagnosis of CHP. The consensus threshold was set at 80% agreement, and median ≤ 2, IQR = 0 on a five-point Likert scale (1: strongly agree, 2: tend to agree, 3: neither agree nor disagree, 4: disagree, 5: strongly disagree). RESULTS: In two rounds, 36/40 experts participated. Experts agreed on 18 exposure items to ask every patient with suspected CHP. Themes included CHP inducing exposures, features that contribute to an exposure's relevance, and quantification of a relevant exposure. Based on the results from the literature review and Delphi process, a CHP exposure assessment instrument was derived. Using cognitive interviews, the instrument was revised by ILD patients for readability and usability. CONCLUSIONS: This Delphi survey provides items that ILD experts agree are important to ask in all patients presenting with suspected CHP and provides basis for a systematically derived CHP exposure assessment instrument. Clinical utility of this exposure assessment instrument may be affected by different local prevalence patterns of exposures. Ongoing research is required to clinically validate these items and consider their impact in more geographically diverse settings.

Journal article

Invernizzi R, Barnett J, Rawal B, Nair A, Ghai P, Kingston S, Chua F, Wu Z, Wells A, Renzoni E, Nicholson A, Rice A, Lloyd C, Byrne A, Maher T, Devaraj A, Molyneaux Pet al., 2020, Bacterial burden in the lower airways predicts disease progression in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and is independent of radiological disease extent, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 55, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0903-1936

Increasing bacterial burden in the lower airways of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis confers an increased risk of disease progression and mortality. However, it remains unclear whether this increased bacterial burden directly influences progression of fibrosis or simply reflects the magnitude of the underlying disease extent or severity.We prospectively recruited 193 patients who underwent bronchoscopy and received a multidisciplinary diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Quantification of the total bacterial burden in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was performed by 16S rRNA gene qPCR. Imaging was independently evaluated by two readers assigning quantitative scores for extent, severity and topography of radiographic changes and relationship of these features with bacterial burden was assessed.Increased bacterial burden significantly associated with disease progression (hazard ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.287–3.474; p=0.0028). Multivariate stepwise regression demonstrated no relationship between bacterial burden and radiological features or extent of disease. When specifically considering patients with definite or probable usual interstitial pneumonia there was no difference in bacterial burden between these two groups. Despite a postulated association between pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and clinical infection, there was no relationship between either the presence or extent of pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and bacterial burden.We demonstrate that bacterial burden in the lower airways is not simply secondary to the extent of the underlying architectural destruction of the lung parenchyma seen in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The independent nature of this association supports a relationship with the underlying pathogenic mechanisms and highlights the urgent need for functional studies.

Journal article

Stock CJW, De Lauretis A, Visca D, Daccord C, Kokosi M, Kouranos V, Margaritopoulos G, George PM, Molyneaux PL, Nihtyanova S, Chua F, Maher TM, Ong V, Abraham DJ, Denton CP, Wells AU, Wain LV, Renzoni EAet al., 2020, Defining genetic risk factors for scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease : IRF5 and STAT4 gene variants are associated with scleroderma while STAT4 is protective against scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease, Clinical Rheumatology, Vol: 39, Pages: 1173-1179, ISSN: 0770-3198

Although several genetic associations with scleroderma (SSc) are defined, very little is known on genetic susceptibility to SSc-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD). A number of common polymorphisms have been associated with SSc-ILD, but most have not been replicated in separate populations. Four SNPs in IRF5, and one in each of STAT4, CD226 and IRAK1, selected as having been previously the most consistently associated with SSc-ILD, were genotyped in 612 SSc patients, of European descent, of whom 394 had ILD. The control population (n = 503) comprised individuals of European descent from the 1000 Genomes Project. After Bonferroni correction, two of the IRF5 SNPs, rs2004640 (OR (95% CI)1.30 (1.10-1.54), pcorr = 0.015) and rs10488631 (OR 1.48 (1.14-1.92), pcorr = 0.022), and the STAT4 SNP rs7574865 (OR 1.43 (1.18-1.73), pcorr = 0.0015) were significantly associated with SSc compared with controls. However, none of the SNPs were significantly different between patients with SSc-ILD and controls. Two SNPs in IRF5, rs10488631 (OR 1.72 (1.24-2.39), pcorr = 0.0098), and rs2004640 (OR 1.39 (1.11-1.75), pcorr = 0.03), showed a significant difference in allele frequency between controls and patients without ILD, as did STAT4 rs7574865 (OR 1.86 (1.45-2.38), pcorr = 6.6 × 10-6). A significant difference between SSc with and without ILD was only observed for STAT4 rs7574865, being less frequent in patients with ILD (OR 0.66 (0.51-0.85), pcorr = 0.0084). In conclusion, IRF5 rs2004640 and rs10488631, and STAT4 rs7574865 were significantly associated with SSc as a whole. Only STAT4 rs7574865 showed a significant difference in allele frequency in SSc-ILD, with the T allele being protective against ILD.Key points• We confirm the associations of the IRF5 SNPs rs2004640 and rs10488631, and the STAT4 SNP rs7574865, with SSc as a whole.&b

Journal article

Maher TM, Simpson JK, Porter JC, Wilson FJ, Chan R, Eames R, Cui Y, Siederer S, Parry S, Kenny J, Slack RJ, Sahota J, Paul L, Saunders P, Molyneaux PL, Lukey PT, Rizzo G, Searle GE, Marshall RP, Saleem A, Kang'ombe AR, Fairman D, Fahy WA, Vahdati-Bolouri Met al., 2020, A positron emission tomography imaging study to confirm target engagement in the lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis following a single dose of a novel inhaled αvβ6 integrin inhibitor, Respiratory Research, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1465-9921

BackgroundIdiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive lung disease with poor prognosis and a significant unmet medical need. This study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK) and target engagement in the lungs, of GSK3008348, a novel inhaled alpha-v beta-6 (αvβ6) integrin inhibitor, in participants with IPF.MethodsThis was a phase 1b, randomised, double-blind (sponsor unblind) study, conducted in the UK (two clinical sites, one imaging unit) between June 2017 and July 2018 (NCT03069989). Participants with a definite or probable diagnosis of IPF received a single nebulised dose of 1000 mcg GSK3008348 or placebo (ratio 5:2) in two dosing periods. In period 1, safety and PK assessments were performed up to 24 h post-dose; in period 2, after a 7-day to 28-day washout, participants underwent a total of three positron emission tomography (PET) scans: baseline, Day 1 (~ 30 min post-dosing) and Day 2 (~ 24 h post-dosing), using a radiolabelled αvβ6-specific ligand, [18F]FB-A20FMDV2. The primary endpoint was whole lung volume of distribution (VT), not corrected for air volume, at ~ 30 min post-dose compared with pre-dose. The study success criterion, determined using Bayesian analysis, was a posterior probability (true % reduction in VT > 0%) of ≥80%.ResultsEight participants with IPF were enrolled and seven completed the study. Adjusted posterior median reduction in uncorrected VT at ~ 30 min after GSK3008348 inhalation was 20% (95% CrI: − 9 to 42%). The posterior probability that the true % reduction in VT > 0% was 93%. GSK3008348 was well tolerated with no reports of serious adverse events or clinically significant abnormalities that were attributable to study treatment. PK was successfully characterised showing rapid absorption followed by a multiphasic elimination.ConclusionsThis study demonstrated engagement of th

Journal article

Allen RJ, Guillen-Guio B, Oldham JM, Ma S-F, Dressen A, Paynton ML, Kraven LM, Obeidat M, Li X, Ng M, Braybrooke R, Molina-Molina M, Hobbs BD, Putman RK, Sakornsakolpat P, Booth HL, Fahy WA, Hart SP, Hill MR, Hirani N, Hubbard RB, McAnulty RJ, Millar AB, Navaratnam V, Oballa E, Parfrey H, Saini G, Whyte MKB, Zhang Y, Kaminski N, Adegunsoye A, Strek ME, Neighbors M, Sheng XR, Gudmundsson G, Gudnason V, Hatabu H, Lederer DJ, Manichaikul A, Newell Jr JD, O'Connor GT, Ortega VE, Xu H, Fingerlin TE, Bossé Y, Hao K, Joubert P, Nickle DC, Sin DD, Timens W, Furniss D, Morris AP, Zondervan K, Hall IP, Sayers I, Tobin MD, Maher TM, Cho MH, Hunninghake GM, Schwartz DA, Yaspan BL, Molyneaux PL, Flores C, Noth I, Jenkins RG, Wain LVet al., 2020, Genome-wide association study of susceptibility to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 201, Pages: 564-574, ISSN: 1073-449X

Rationale: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a complex lung disease characterised by scarring of the lung that is believed to result from an atypical response to injury of the epithelium. Genome-wide association studies have reported signals of association implicating multiple pathways including host defence, telomere maintenance, signalling and cell-cell adhesion. Objectives: To improve our understanding of factors that increase IPF susceptibility by identifying previously unreported genetic associations. Methods and measurements: We conducted genome-wide analyses across three independent studies and meta-analysed these results to generate the largest genome-wide association study of IPF to date (2,668 IPF cases and 8,591 controls). We performed replication in two independent studies (1,456 IPF cases and 11,874 controls) and functional analyses (including statistical fine-mapping, investigations into gene expression and testing for enrichment of IPF susceptibility signals in regulatory regions) to determine putatively causal genes. Polygenic risk scores were used to assess the collective effect of variants not reported as associated with IPF. Main results: We identified and replicated three new genome-wide significant (P<5×10−8) signals of association with IPF susceptibility (associated with altered gene expression of KIF15, MAD1L1 and DEPTOR) and confirmed associations at 11 previously reported loci. Polygenic risk score analyses showed that the combined effect of many thousands of as-yet unreported IPF susceptibility variants contribute to IPF susceptibility. Conclusions: The observation that decreased DEPTOR expression associates with increased susceptibility to IPF, supports recent studies demonstrating the importance of mTOR signalling in lung fibrosis. New signals of association implicating KIF15 and MAD1L1 suggest a possible role of mitotic spindle-assembly genes in IPF susceptibility.

Journal article

Zhang YZ, Brambilla C, Molyneaux PL, Rice A, Robertus JL, Jordan S, Lim E, Lang-Lazdunski L, Begum S, Dusmet M, Anikin V, Beddow E, Finch J, Asadi N, Popat S, Cookson WOC, Moffatt MF, Nicholson AGet al., 2020, Utility of nuclear grading system in epithelioid malignant pleural mesothelioma in biopsy-heavy setting, The American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol: 44, Pages: 347-356, ISSN: 0147-5185

Nuclear grading systems for epithelioid malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) have been proposed but it remains uncertain if they could be applied in a biopsy-heavy setting. Using the proposed system, we conducted an independent, external validation study using 563 consecutive cases of epithelioid MPM diagnosed at our institution between 2003 and 2017, of which 87% of patients underwent biopsies only. The median number of sites sampled was 1, with a median maximum tissue dimension of 17 mm (biopsy) and 150 mm (resection). The median overall survival (OS) was 14.7 months. The frequencies of grade I, II, and III tumors were 31% (132/563), 52% (292/563), and 17% (94/563). Grade I tumors were associated with the most favorable median OS (24.7 mo) followed by grades II (12.7 mo) and III (7.2 mo). The 2-tier nuclear grade separated tumors into low grade (19.3 mo) and high grade (8.9 mo). In multivariate analysis, 3-tier nuclear grade, 2-tier nuclear grade, and mitosis-necrosis score predicted OS independent of age, procedural type, solid-predominant growth pattern, necrosis, and atypical mitosis (all P<0.001 except 2-tier nuclear grade, P=0.001). In the scenario of a single- site biopsy with tissue dimension ≤10 mm, none but age (P=0.002) were independently predictive. Our data also suggested sampling 3 sites or a maximum tissue dimension of at least 20 mm from a single site is optimal for nuclear grade assessment. In conclusion our study confirmed the utility of nuclear grade in epithelioid MPM using a biopsy-heavy cohort provided the tissue sample met minimum dimensional criteria.

Journal article

Carney SM, Clemente JC, Cox MJ, Dickson RP, Huang YJ, Kitsios GD, Kloepfer KM, Leung JM, LeVan TD, Molyneaux PL, Moore BB, O'Dwyer DN, Segal LN, Garantziotis S, ATS Allergy, Immunology and Inflammation Assembly Working Group on Microbiome in Lung Diseaseet al., 2020, Methods in lung microbiome research., American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology, Vol: 62, Pages: 283-299, ISSN: 1044-1549

The lung microbiome is associated with host immune response and health outcomes in experimental models and patient cohorts. Lung microbiome research is increasing in volume and scope; however, there are no established guidelines for study design, conduct and reporting of lung microbiome studies. Standardized approaches to yield reliable and reproducible data that can be synthesized across studies, will ultimately improve the scientific rigor and impact of published work and greatly benefit microbiome research. In this review, we identify and address several key elements of microbiome research: conceptual modeling and hypothesis framing, study design, experimental methodology and pitfalls, data analysis and reporting considerations. Finally, we explore possible future directions and research opportunities. Our goal is to aid investigators who are interested in this burgeoning research area and will hopefully provide the foundation for formulating consensus approaches in lung microbiome research.

Journal article

Byrne A, powell J, O'Sullivan B, Ogger P, Hoffland A, Cook J, Bonner K, Hewitt R, Simone W, Ghai P, Walker S, Lukowski S, Molyneaux P, Saglani S, Chambers D, Maher T, Lloyd Cet al., 2020, Dynamics of human monocytes and airway macrophages during healthy aging and post-transplant, Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol: 217, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 0022-1007

The ontogeny of airway macrophages (AMs) in human lung and their contribution to disease are poorly mapped out. In mice, aging is associated with an increasing proportion of peripherally, as opposed to perinatally derived AMs. We sought to understand AM ontogeny in human lung during healthy aging and after transplant. We characterized monocyte/macrophage populations from the peripheral blood and airways of healthy volunteers across infancy/childhood (2–12 yr), maturity (20–50 yr), and older adulthood (>50 yr). Single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) was performed on airway inflammatory cells isolated from sex-mismatched lung transplant recipients. During healthy aging, the proportions of blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) classical monocytes peak in adulthood and decline in older adults. scRNA-seq of BAL cells from lung transplant recipients indicates that after transplant, the majority of AMs are recipient derived. These data show that during aging, the peripheral monocyte phenotype is consistent with that found in the airways and, furthermore, that the majority of human AMs after transplant are derived from circulating monocytes.

Journal article

Bax S, Jacob J, Ahmed R, Bredy C, Dimopoulos K, Kempny A, Kokosi M, Kier G, Renzoni E, Molyneaux PL, Chua F, Kouranos V, George P, McCabe C, Wilde M, Devaraj A, Wells A, Wort SJ, Price LCet al., 2020, Right ventricle to left ventricle ratio at CTPA predicts mortality in interstitial lung disease, Chest, Vol: 157, Pages: 89-98, ISSN: 0012-3692

INTRODUCTION: Patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) may develop pulmonary hypertension (PH), often disproportionate to ILD severity. Right ventricle to left ventricle diameter ratio (RV:LV) measured at CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA), has been shown to provide valuable information in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients and to predict death or deterioration in acute pulmonary embolism. METHODS: Demographics, ILD subtype, echocardiography and detailed CTPA measurements were collected in consecutive patients undergoing both CTPA and right heart catheterisation (RHC) at the Royal Brompton Hospital between 2005 and 2015. Fibrosis severity was formally scored using CT criteria. RV:LV ratio at CTPA was evaluated by three different methods. Cox-proportional hazard analysis was used to assess the relation of CTPA-derived parameters to predict death or lung transplantation. RESULTS: 92 patients were included: 64% male, mean age 65±11 years, with FVC 57±20% (predicted), TLCOc 22±8% (predicted) and KCOc 51±17% (predicted). PH was confirmed at RHC in 78%. Of all CTPA-derived measures, an RV:LV ratio ≥1.0 strongly predicted mortality or transplantation at univariate analysis (HR 3.26, 95%CI:1.49-7.13, p=0.003), whereas invasive haemodynamic data did not. The RV:LV ratio remained an independent predictor at multivariate analysis (HR: 3.19, CI:1.44-7.10, p=0.004), adjusting for an ILD diagnosis of IPF and CT derived ILD severity. CONCLUSION: An increased RV:LV ratio measured at CTPA provides a simple, non-invasive method of risk stratification in patients with suspected ILD-PH. This should prompt closer follow up, more aggressive treatment and consideration of lung transplantation.

Journal article

Spagnolo P, Molyneaux PL, Bernardinello N, Cocconcelli E, Biondini D, Fracasso F, Tiné M, Saetta M, Maher TM, Balestro Eet al., 2019, The role of the lung's microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, International Journal of Molecular Sciences, Vol: 20, ISSN: 1422-0067

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a chronic, progressive, fibrosing interstitial lung disease that commonly affects older adults and is associated with the histopathological and/or radiological patterns of usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). Despite significant advances in our understanding of disease pathobiology and natural history, what causes IPF remains unknown. A potential role for infection in the disease's pathogenesis and progression or as a trigger of acute exacerbation has long been postulated, but initial studies based on traditional culture methods have yielded inconsistent results. The recent application to IPF of culture-independent techniques for microbiological analysis has revealed previously unappreciated alterations of the lung microbiome, as well as an increased bacterial burden in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) of IPF patients, although correlation does not necessarily entail causation. In addition, the lung microbiome remains only partially characterized and further research should investigate organisms other than bacteria and viruses, including fungi. The clarification of the role of the microbiome in the pathogenesis and progression of IPF may potentially allow its manipulation, providing an opportunity for targeted therapeutic intervention.

Journal article

Alfieri V, Crisafulli E, Visca D, Chong WH, Stock C, Mori L, de Lauretis A, Tsipouri V, Chua F, Kouranos V, Kokosi M, Hogben C, Molyneaux PL, George PM, Maher TM, Chetta AA, Sestini P, Wells AU, Renzoni EAet al., 2019, Physiological predictors of exertional oxygen desaturation in patients with fibrotic interstitial lung disease, European Respiratory Journal, Vol: 55, Pages: 1-4, ISSN: 0903-1936

Journal article

Santermans E, Ford P, Kreuter M, Verbruggen N, Meyvisch P, Wuyts WA, Brown KK, Lederer DJ, Byrne AJ, Molyneaux PL, Sivananthan A, Moor CC, Maher TM, Wijsenbeek Met al., 2019, Modelling forced vital capacity in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: optimising trial design., Advances in Therapy, Vol: 36, Pages: 3059-3070, ISSN: 0741-238X

INTRODUCTION: Forced vital capacity is the only registrational endpoint in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis clinical trials. As most new treatments will be administered on top of standard of care, estimating treatment response will become more challenging. We developed a simulation model to quantify variability associated with forced vital capacity decline. METHODS: The model is based on publicly available clinical trial summary and home spirometry data. A single, illustrative trial setting is reported. Model assumptions are 400 subjects randomised 1:1 to investigational drug or placebo over 52 weeks, 50% of each group receiving standard of care (all-comer population), and a 90-mL treatment difference in annual forced vital capacity decline. Longitudinal profiles were simulated and the impact of varying clinical scenarios evaluated. RESULTS: Power to detect a significant treatment difference was 87-97%, depending on the analysis method. Repeated measures analysis generally outperformed analysis of covariance and mixed linear models, particularly with missing data (as simulated data were non-linear). A 15% yearly random dropout rate led to 0.6-5% power loss. Forced vital capacity decline-related dropout introduced greater power loss (up to 12%), as did subjects starting/stopping standard of care or investigational drug. Power was substantially lower for a 26-week trial due to the smaller assumed treatment effect at week 26 (sample size would need doubling to reach a power similar to that of a 52-week trial). CONCLUSIONS: Our model quantifies forced vital capacity decline and associated variability, with all the caveats of background therapy, permitting robust power calculations to inform future idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis clinical trial design. FUNDING: Galapagos NV (Mechelen, Belgium).

Journal article

Allden SJ, Ogger PP, Ghai P, McErlean P, Hewitt R, Toshner R, Walker SA, Saunders P, Kingston S, Molyneaux PL, Maher TM, Lloyd CM, Byrne AJet al., 2019, The transferrin receptor CD71 delineates functionally distinct airway macrophage subsets during idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 200, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating progressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Airway macrophages (AMs) are key components of the defence of the airways and are implicated in the pathogenesis of IPF. Alterations in iron metabolism have been described during fibrotic lung disease and in murine models of lung fibrosis. However, the role of transferrin receptor-1 (CD71)-expressing AMs in IPF is not known. OBJECTIVES: To assess the role of CD71 expressing AMs in the IPF-lung. METHODS: We utilized multi-parameter flow cytometry, gene expression analysis and phagocytosis/transferrin uptake assays to delineate the role of AMs expressing, or lacking, CD71 in the BAL of patients with IPF or healthy controls. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: There was a distinct increase in proportions of AMs lacking CD71 in IPF patients in comparison to healthy controls. Levels of BAL transferrin were enhanced in IPF-BAL and furthermore, CD71- AMs had an impaired ability to sequester transferrin. CD71+ and CD71- AMs were phenotypically, functionally and transcriptionally distinct, with CD71- AMs characterised by reduced expression of markers of macrophage maturity, impaired phagocytosis and enhanced expression of pro-fibrotic genes. Importantly, proportions of AMs lacking CD71 were independently associated with worse survival, underlining the importance of this population in IPF and as a potential therapeutic target. CONCLUSIONS: Taken together these data highlight how CD71 delineates AM subsets which play distinct roles in IPF and furthermore, CD71- AMs may be an important pathogenic component of fibrotic lung disease.

Journal article

Moore C, Blumhagen RZ, Yang IV, Walts A, Powers J, Walker T, Bishop M, Russell P, Vestal B, Cardwell J, Markin CR, Mathai SK, Schwarz MI, Steele MP, Lee J, Brown KK, Loyd JE, Crapo JD, Silverman EK, Cho MH, James JA, Guthridge JM, Cogan JD, Kropski JA, Swigris JJ, Bair C, Soon Kim D, Ji W, Kim H, Song JW, Maier LA, Pacheco KA, Hirani N, Poon AS, Li F, Jenkins RG, Braybrooke R, Saini G, Maher TM, Molyneaux PL, Saunders P, Zhang Y, Gibson KF, Kass DJ, Rojas M, Sembrat J, Wolters PJ, Collard HR, Sundy JS, O'Riordan T, Strek ME, Noth I, Ma S-F, Porteous MK, Kreider ME, Patel NB, Inoue Y, Hirose M, Arai T, Akagawa S, Eickelberg O, Fernandez IE, Behr J, Mogulkoc N, Corte TJ, Glaspole I, Tomassetti S, Ravaglia C, Poletti V, Crestani B, Borie R, Kannengiesser C, Parfrey H, Fiddler C, Rassl D, Molina-Molina M, Machahua C, Montes Worboys A, Gudmundsson G, Isaksson HJ, Lederer DJ, Podolanczuk AJ, Montesi SB, Bendstrup E, Danchel V, Selman M, Pardo A, Henry MT, Keane MP, Doran P, Vašáková M, Sterclova M, Ryerson CJ, Wilcox PG, Okamoto T, Furusawa H, Miyazaki Y, Laurent G, Baltic S, Prele C, Moodley Y, Shea BS, Ohta K, Suzukawa M, Narumoto O, Nathan SD, Venuto DC, Woldehanna ML, Kokturk N, de Andrade JA, Luckhardt T, Kulkarni T, Bonella F, Donnelly SC, McElroy A, Armstrong ME, Aranda A, Carbone RG, Puppo F, Beckman KB, Nickerson DA, Fingerlin TE, Schwartz DAet al., 2019, Resequencing study confirms host defense and cell senescence gene variants contribute to the risk of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol: 200, Pages: 199-208, ISSN: 1073-449X

RATIONALE: Several common and rare genetic variants have been associated with Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive fibrotic condition that is localized to the lung. OBJECTIVE: To develop an integrated understanding of the rare and common variants located in multiple loci that have been reported to contribute to the risk of disease. METHODS: We performed deep targeted resequencing (3.69 Mb of DNA) in cases (N=3,624) and controls (N=4,442) across genes and regions previously associated with disease. We tested for association between disease and a) individual common variants via logistic regression and b) groups of rare variants via a sequence kernel association test. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Statistically significant common variant association signals occurred in all 10 of the regions chosen based on genome-wide association studies. The strongest risk variant is the MUC5B promoter variant, rs35705950, with an OR of 5.45 (95% CI: 4.91-6.06) for one copy of the risk allele and 18.68 (95% CI: 13.34-26.17) for two copies of the risk allele (p=9.60 x 10-295). In addition to identifying for the first time that rare variation in FAM13A is associated with disease, we confirmed the role of rare variation in risk of IPF in the TERT and RTEL1 gene regions, and found that the FAM13A and TERT regions have independent common and rare variant signals. CONCLUSIONS: A limited number of common and rare variants contribute to the risk of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis in each of the resequencing regions; these genetic variants focus on biological mechanisms of host defense and cell senescence.

Journal article

Organ L, Duggan A-M, Oballa E, Taggart S, Simpson J, Kangombe A, Braybrooke R, Molyneaux P, North B, Karkera Y, Leeming D, Karsdal M, Nanthakumar C, Fahy W, Marshall R, Jenkins G, Maher Tet al., 2019, Biomarkers of collagen synthesis predict progression in the PROFILE idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis cohort., Respiratory Research, Vol: 20, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 1465-9921

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is characterised by excessive extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and remodelling. Measuring this activity provides an opportunity to develop tools capable of identifying individuals at-risk of progression. Longitudinal change in markers of ECM synthesis was assessed in 145 newly-diagnosed individuals with IPF.Serum levels of collagen synthesis neoepitopes, PRO-C3 and PRO-C6 (collagen type 3 and 6), were elevated in IPF compared with controls at baseline, and progressive disease versus stable disease during follow up, (PRO-C3 p < 0.001; PRO-C6 p = 0.029). Assessment of rate of change in neoepitope levels from baseline to 3 months (defined as ‘slope to month 3’: HIGH slope, slope > 0 vs. LOW slope, slope < =0) demonstrated no relationship with mortality for these markers (PRO-C3 (HR 1.62, p = 0.080); PINP (HR 0.76, p = 0.309); PRO-C6 (HR 1.14, p = 0.628)). As previously reported, rising concentrations of collagen degradation markers C1M, C3M, C6M and CRPM were associated with an increased risk of overall mortality (HR = 1.84, CI 1.03–3.27, p = 0.038, HR = 2.44, CI 1.39–4.31, p = 0.002; HR = 2.19, CI 1.25–3.82, p = 0.006; HR = 2.13 CI 1.21–3.75, p = 0.009 respectively).Elevated levels of PRO-C3 and PRO-C6 associate with IPF disease progression. Collagen synthesis and degradation biomarkers have the potential to enhance clinical trials in IPF and may inform prognostic assessment and therapeutic decision making in the clinic.

Journal article

Invernizzi R, Molyneaux PL, 2019, The contribution of infection and the respiratory microbiome in acute exacerbations of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, European Respiratory Review, Vol: 28, ISSN: 0905-9180

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) arises in genetically susceptible individuals as a result of an aberrant wound-healing response following repetitive alveolar injury. The clinical course of the disease remains both variable and unpredictable with periods of more rapid decline, termed acute exacerbation of IPF (AE-IPF), often punctuating the disease trajectory. Exacerbations carry a significant morbidity and mortality, and their exact pathogenesis remains unclear. Given the emerging evidence that disruption and alteration in the lung microbiome plays a role in the pathogenesis and progression of IPF, this review discusses the current knowledge of the contribution of infection and the respiratory microbiome to AE-IPF.

Journal article

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