Imperial College London

ProfessorPaoloMuraro

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Brain Sciences

Professor of Neurology - Neuroimmunology and Immunotherapy
 
 
 
//

Contact

 

p.muraro Website

 
 
//

Location

 

E415Burlington DanesHammersmith Campus

//

Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

219 results found

Cencioni MT, Genchi A, Brittain G, de Silva TI, Sharrack B, Snowden JA, Alexander T, Greco R, Muraro PAet al., 2022, Immune Reconstitution Following Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Sclerosis: A Review on Behalf of the EBMT Autoimmune Diseases Working Party, FRONTIERS IN IMMUNOLOGY, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1664-3224

Journal article

Jacobs SAH, Muraro PA, Cencioni MT, Knowles S, Cole JH, Nicholas Ret al., 2022, Worse Physical Disability Is Associated With the Expression of PD-1 on Inflammatory T-Cells in Multiple Sclerosis Patients With Older Appearing Brains, FRONTIERS IN NEUROLOGY, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1664-2295

Journal article

Goklemez S, Hasni S, Hakim FT, Muraro PA, Pirsl F, Rose J, Memon S, Fowler DF, Steinberg SM, Baker EH, Panch SR, Gress R, Illei GG, Lipsky PE, Pavletic SZet al., 2021, Long-term follow-up after lymphodepleting autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation for treatment-resistant systemic lupus erythematosus, RHEUMATOLOGY, ISSN: 1462-0324

Journal article

Uccelli A, Laroni A, Ali R, Battaglia MA, Blinkenberg M, Brundin L, Clanet M, Fernandez O, Marriot J, Muraro P, Nabavi SM, Oliveri RS, Radue E, Tello CR, Schiavetti I, Sellner J, Sorensen PS, Sormani MP, Wuerfel JT, Freedman MSet al., 2021, Safety, tolerability, and activity of mesenchymal stem cells versus placebo in multiple sclerosis (MESEMS): a phase 2, randomised, double-blind crossover trial, LANCET NEUROLOGY, Vol: 20, Pages: 917-929, ISSN: 1474-4422

Journal article

Nicholas RS, Rhone EE, Mariottini A, Silber E, Malik O, Singh-Curry V, Turner B, Scalfari A, Ciccarelli O, Sormani MP, Olavarria E, Mehra V, Gabriel I, Kazmi MA, Muraro Pet al., 2021, Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Active Multiple Sclerosis A Real-world Case Series, NEUROLOGY, Vol: 97, Pages: E890-E901, ISSN: 0028-3878

Journal article

Amoriello R, Chernigovskaya M, Greiff V, Carnasciali A, Massacesi L, Barilaro A, Repice AM, Biagioli T, Aldinucci A, Muraro PA, Laplaud DA, Lossius A, Ballerini Cet al., 2021, TCR repertoire diversity in Multiple Sclerosis: High-dimensional bioinformatics analysis of sequences from brain, cerebrospinal fluid and peripheral blood, EBioMedicine, Vol: 68, Pages: 103429-103429, ISSN: 2352-3964

BACKGROUND: T cells play a key role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic, inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Although several studies recently investigated the T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of MS patients by high-throughput sequencing (HTS), a deep analysis on repertoire similarities and differences among compartments is still missing. METHODS: We performed comprehensive bioinformatics on high-dimensional TCR Vβ sequencing data from published and unpublished MS and healthy donors (HD) studies. We evaluated repertoire polarization, clone distribution, shared CDR3 amino acid sequences (CDR3s-a.a.) across repertoires, clone overlap with public databases, and TCR similarity architecture. FINDINGS: CSF repertoires showed a significantly higher public clones percentage and sequence similarity compared to peripheral blood (PB). On the other hand, we failed to reject the null hypothesis that the repertoire polarization is the same between CSF and PB. One Primary-Progressive MS (PPMS) CSF repertoire differed from the others in terms of TCR similarity architecture. Cluster analysis splits MS from HD. INTERPRETATION: In MS patients, the presence of a physiological barrier, the blood-brain barrier, does not impact clone prevalence and distribution, but impacts public clones, indicating CSF as a more private site. We reported a high Vβ sequence similarity in the CSF-TCR architecture in one PPMS. If confirmed it may be an interesting insight into MS progressive inflammatory mechanisms. The clustering of MS repertoires from HD suggests that disease shapes the TCR Vβ clonal profile. FUNDING: This study was partly financially supported by the Italian Multiple Sclerosis Foundation (FISM), that contributed to Ballerini-DB data collection (grant #2015 R02).

Journal article

Cencioni MT, Mattoscio M, Magliozzi R, Bar-Or A, Muraro PAet al., 2021, B cells in multiple sclerosis - from targeted depletion to immune reconstitution therapies, NATURE REVIEWS NEUROLOGY, Vol: 17, Pages: 399-414, ISSN: 1759-4758

Journal article

Greco R, Alexander T, Burman J, Del Papa N, de Vries-Bouwstra J, Farge D, Henes J, Kazmi M, Kirgizov K, Muraro PA, Ricart E, Rovira M, Saccardi R, Sharrack B, Snarski E, Withers B, Jessop H, Boglione C, Kramer E, Badoglio M, Labopin M, Orchard K, Corbacioglu S, Ljungman P, Mikulska M, De la Camara R, Snowden JAet al., 2021, Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for autoimmune diseases in the time of COVID-19: EBMT guidelines and recommendations, BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION, Vol: 56, Pages: 1493-1508, ISSN: 0268-3369

Journal article

Burt RK, Muraro PA, Farge D, Oliveira MC, Snowden JA, Saccardi R, Han X, Quigley K, Bueno V, Frasca D, Fedorenko D, Burman Jet al., 2021, New autoimmune diseases after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for multiple sclerosis, BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION, Vol: 56, Pages: 1509-1517, ISSN: 0268-3369

Journal article

Roberts F, Hobbs H, Jessop H, Bozzolini C, Burman J, Greco R, Ismail A, Kazmi M, Kirgizov K, Mancardi G, Mawson S, Muraro PA, Puyade M, Saccardi R, Withers B, Verhoeven B, Sharrack B, Snowden JAet al., 2020, Rehabilitation before and after Autologous Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (AHSCT) for patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS): consensus guidelines and recommendations for best clinical practice on behalf of the autoimmune diseases working party, nurses group, and patient advocacy committee of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), Frontiers in Neurology, Vol: 11, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1664-2295

Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) is increasingly used to treat people with multiple sclerosis (MS). Supported by an evolving evidence base, AHSCT can suppress active inflammation in the central nervous system and induce long-term changes in immune cell populations, thereby stabilizing, and, in some cases, reversing disability in carefully selected MS patients. However, AHSCT is an intensive chemotherapy-based procedure associated with intrinsic risks, including profound cytopenia, infection, and organ toxicity, accompanied by an on-going degree of immuno-compromise and general deconditioning, which can be associated with a transient increase in functional impairment in the early stages after transplantation. Although international guidelines and recommendations have been published for clinical and technical aspects of AHSCT in MS, there has been no detailed appraisal of the rehabilitation needed following treatment nor any specific guidelines as to how this is best delivered by hospital and community-based therapists and wider multidisciplinary teams in order to maximize functional recovery and quality of life. These expert consensus guidelines aim to address this unmet need by summarizing the evidence-base for AHSCT in MS and providing recommendations for current rehabilitation practice along with identifying areas for future research and development.

Journal article

Cencioni MT, Ali R, Nicholas R, Muraro PAet al., 2020, Defective CD19+CD24(hi)CD38(hi)transitional B-cell function in patients with relapsing-remitting MS, MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS JOURNAL, Vol: 27, Pages: 1187-1197, ISSN: 1352-4585

Journal article

Iacobaeus E, Arrambide G, Amato MP, Derfuss T, Vukusic S, Hemmer B, Tintore M, Brundin L, 2018 ECTRIMS Focused Workshop Groupet al., 2020, Aggressive multiple sclerosis (1): Towards a definition of the phenotype., Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Vol: 26, Pages: 1031-1044, ISSN: 1352-4585

While the major phenotypes of multiple sclerosis (MS) and relapsing-remitting, primary and secondary progressive MS have been well characterized, a subgroup of patients with an active, aggressive disease course and rapid disability accumulation remains difficult to define and there is no consensus about their management and treatment. The current lack of an accepted definition and treatment guidelines for aggressive MS triggered a 2018 focused workshop of the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) on aggressive MS. The aim of the workshop was to discuss approaches on how to describe and define the disease phenotype and its treatments. Unfortunately, it was not possible to come to consensus on a definition because of unavailable data correlating severe disease with imaging and molecular biomarkers. However, the workshop highlighted the need for future research needed to define this disease subtype while also focusing on its treatment and management. Here, we review previous attempts to define aggressive MS and present characteristics that might, with additional research, eventually help characterize it. A companion paper summarizes data regarding treatment and management.

Journal article

Arrambide G, Iacobaeus E, Amato MP, Derfuss T, Vukusic S, Hemmer B, Brundin L, Tintore M, 2018 ECTRIMS Focused Workshop Groupet al., 2020, Aggressive multiple sclerosis (2): Treatment., Multiple Sclerosis Journal, Vol: 26, Pages: 1045-1063, ISSN: 1352-4585

The natural history of multiple sclerosis (MS) is highly heterogeneous. A subgroup of patients has what might be termed aggressive MS. These patients may have frequent, severe relapses with incomplete recovery and are at risk of developing greater and permanent disability at the earlier stages of the disease. Their therapeutic window of opportunity may be narrow, and while it is generally considered that they will benefit from starting early with a highly efficacious treatment, a unified definition of aggressive MS does not exist and data on its treatment are largely lacking. Based on discussions at an international focused workshop sponsored by the European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS), we review our current knowledge about treatment of individuals with aggressive MS. We analyse the available evidence, identify gaps in knowledge and suggest future research needed to fill those gaps. A companion paper details the difficulties in developing a consensus about what defines aggressive MS.

Journal article

Mariottini A, De Matteis E, Muraro PA, 2020, Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Sclerosis: Current Status, BIODRUGS, Vol: 34, Pages: 307-325, ISSN: 1173-8804

Journal article

L√ľnemann JD, Ruck T, Muraro PA, Bar-Or A, Wiendl Het al., 2020, Author Correction: Immune reconstitution therapies: concepts for durable remission in multiple sclerosis., Nat Rev Neurol, Vol: 16

An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.

Journal article

Sharrack B, Saccardi R, Alexander T, Badoglio M, Burman J, Farge D, Greco R, Jessop H, Kazmi M, Kirgizov K, Labopin M, Mancardi G, Martin R, Moore J, Muraro PA, Rovira M, Sormani MP, Snowden JA, European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation EBMT Autoimmune Diseases Working Party ADWP and the Joint Accreditation Committee of the International Society for Cellular Therapy ISCT and EBMT JACIEet al., 2020, Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and other cellular therapy in multiple sclerosis and immune-mediated neurological diseases: updated guidelines and recommendations from the EBMT Autoimmune Diseases Working Party (ADWP) and the Joint Accreditation Committee of EBMT and ISCT (JACIE)., Bone Marrow Transplantation, Vol: 55, Pages: 283-306, ISSN: 0268-3369

These updated EBMT guidelines review the clinical evidence, registry activity and mechanisms of action of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in multiple sclerosis (MS) and other immune-mediated neurological diseases and provide recommendations for patient selection, transplant technique, follow-up and future development. The major focus is on autologous HSCT (aHSCT), used in MS for over two decades and currently the fastest growing indication for this treatment in Europe, with increasing evidence to support its use in highly active relapsing remitting MS failing to respond to disease modifying therapies. aHSCT may have a potential role in the treatment of the progressive forms of MS with a significant inflammatory component and other immune-mediated neurological diseases, including chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, neuromyelitis optica, myasthenia gravis and stiff person syndrome. Allogeneic HSCT should only be considered where potential risks are justified. Compared with other immunomodulatory treatments, HSCT is associated with greater short-term risks and requires close interspeciality collaboration between transplant physicians and neurologists with a special interest in these neurological conditions before, during and after treatment in accredited HSCT centres. Other experimental cell therapies are developmental for these diseases and patients should only be treated on clinical trials.

Journal article

Harris KM, Lim N, Lindau P, Robins H, Griffith LM, Nash RA, Turka LA, Muraro PAet al., 2020, Extensive intrathecal T cell renewal following hematopoietic transplantation for multiple sclerosis, JCI INSIGHT, Vol: 5

Journal article

Luenemann JD, Ruck T, Muraro PA, Bar'Or A, Wiendl Het al., 2020, Immune reconstitution therapies: concepts for durable remission in multiple sclerosis, NATURE REVIEWS NEUROLOGY, Vol: 16, Pages: 56-62, ISSN: 1759-4758

Journal article

Mehra V, Rhone E, Widya S, Zuckerman M, Potter V, Raj K, Kulasekararaj A, McLornan D, de Lavallade H, Benson-Quarm N, Lim C, Ware S, Sudhanva M, Malik O, Nicholas R, Muraro PA, Marsh J, Mufti GJ, Silber E, Pagliuca A, Kazmi MAet al., 2019, Epstein-barr virus and monoclonal gammopathy of clinical significance in autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple sclerosis., Clinical Infectious Diseases, Vol: 69, Pages: 1757-1763, ISSN: 1058-4838

INTRODUCTION: Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) conditioning as treatment of active multiple sclerosis (MS) is rapidly increasing across Europe (EBMT registry data 2017). Clinically significant Epstein-Barr virus reactivation (EBV-R) following AHSCT with ATG for severe autoimmune conditions is an underrecognized complication relative to T-cell deplete transplants performed for hematological diseases. This retrospective study reports EBV-R associated significant clinical sequelae in MS patients undergoing AHSCT with rabbit ATG. METHODS: Retrospective data were analyzed for 36 consecutive MS-AHSCT patients at Kings College Hospital, London. All patients routinely underwent weekly EBV DNA polymerase chain reaction monitoring and serum electrophoresis for monoclonal gammopathy (MG or M-protein). EBV-R with rising Epstein-Barr viral load, M-protein, and associated clinical sequelae were captured from clinical records. RESULTS: All patients had evidence of rising EBV DNA-emia, including 7 who were lost to long-term follow-up, with a number of them developing high EBV viral load and associated lymphoproliferative disorder (LPD). Nearly 72% (n = 18/29) developed de novo MG, some with significant neurological consequences with high M-protein and EBV-R. Six patients required anti-CD20 therapy (rituximab) with complete resolution of EBV related symptoms. Receiver operating characteristics estimated a peak EBV viremia of >500 000 DNA copies/mL correlated with high sensitivity (85.5%) and specificity (82.5%) (area under the curve: 0.87; P = .004) in predicting EBV-R related significant clinical events. CONCLUSION: Symptomatic EBV reactivation increases risk of neurological sequelae and LPD in MS-AHSCT. We recommend regular monitoring for EBV and serum electrophoresis for MG in MS patients in the first 3 months post-AHSCT.

Journal article

Muraro PA, Cohen JA, 2019, Complex intensive treatment shows promise against a complex aggressive disease, NEUROLOGY, Vol: 93, Pages: 776-777, ISSN: 0028-3878

Journal article

Sridharan S, Raffel J, Nandoskar A, Record C, Brooks DJ, Owen D, Sharp D, Muraro PA, Gunn R, Nicholas Ret al., 2019, Confirmation of specific binding of the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO) radioligand [18F]GE-180: a blocking study using XBD173 in multiple sclerosis normal appearing white and grey matter, Molecular Imaging and Biology, Vol: 21, Pages: 935-944, ISSN: 1536-1632

Purpose: Positron emission tomography (PET) ligands exhibit different levels of non-displaceable binding in vivo. In the case of ligands for the 18 kDa translocator protein (TSPO), the component of non-displaceable binding for the most widely used radiotracer, [11C]-(R)-PK11195, is relatively high compared to that for newer TSPO ligands. Non-displaceable binding is not often quantified in humans in vivo, partially due to a lack of available ligands that are known to be safe with which to displace binding to the target receptor. Recently, however, a technique has been developed to quantify the non-displaceable binding of TSPO tracers in vivo, by blocking the receptor with the TSPO ligand XBD173 and comparing the total volume of distribution ( ) pre and post-blockade. Here, we used an occupancy plot to quantify the non-displaceable binding ( ) of the TSPO PET tracers [18F]GE-180 and [11C]PBR28 in cohorts of people with multiple sclerosis (MS). We also compared plots of subjects carrying both high and mixed binding affinity polymorphisms of TSPO to estimate while potentially avoiding the need for receptor blockade.Procedures: Twelve people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and high (HAB) or mixed (MAB) affinity binding for TSPO underwent baseline MRI and 90-minute dynamic [18F]GE-180 PET (n=6; 3 HAB and 3 MAB) or [11C]PBR28 PET (n=6; 3 HAB, 3 MAB). Either one week later ([18F]GE-180) or the same afternoon ([11C]PBR28), participants had repeat PET following a 90mg dose of XBD173. PET images were co-registered with T1 MR volumetric images and regions of interest (ROIs) were defined using the 83-region Hammers atlas. Arterial blood sampling was used to generate plasma input functions for the two-tissue compartment model to quantify . The non-displaceable fraction of the total volume of distribution ( ) was calculated using two independent methods: the occupancy plot (by modelling the differences in signal post XBD173), and the polymorphism plot (by modelling the differences in

Journal article

Nicholas R, Chang K, Romozzi M, Cencioni MT, Muraro Pet al., 2019, Programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) in multiple sclerosis (MS) serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 444-445, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Uccelli A, Laroni A, Brundin L, Clanet M, Fernandez O, Nabavi SM, Muraro PA, Oliveri RS, Radue EW, Sellner JT, Sorensen PS, Sormani MP, Wuerfel JT, Battaglia MA, Freedman MSet al., 2019, MEsenchymal StEm cells for Multiple Sclerosis (MESEMS): a multi-center, randomized, double blind, cross-over phase 2 clinical trial with autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 759-760, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Nicholas R, Cortese A, Hill J, Kalam S, Cencioni MT, Muraro Pet al., 2019, Early cervical spinal cord atrophy predicts disability in active relapsing multiple sclerosis: a longitudinal cohort study, 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 472-472, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Marastoni D, Magliozzi R, Howell O, Roncaroli F, Muraro P, Friede T, Calabrese M, Reynolds R, Nicholas Ret al., 2019, High levels of perivascular inflammation and active white matter lesions at time of death are associated with rapidly progressive multiple sclerosis, 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 76-77, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Rigoni E, Singh-Curry V, Nandoskar A, Malik O, Dorsey R, Bergamaschi R, Muraro P, Nicholas R, Scalfari Aet al., 2019, Alemtuzumab as induction versus escalation therapy: efficacy and adverse events in the real-world, 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 773-773, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Ali R, Cencioni MT, Nicholas R, Dazzi F, Muraro Pet al., 2019, Immunological change after MSC infusion in MS patients results from a Phase 2 trial of autologous mesenchymal cell therapy in MS (STREAMS), 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 297-298, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Cencioni MT, Yusuf S, Palmisano I, Lee SB, Ali R, Mazarakis ND, Nicholas R, Costa Frossard L, Villar Guimerans LM, Muraro PAet al., 2019, Soluble CD27 a biomarker of T cell activity in intrathecal inflammation in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, 35th Congress of the European-Committee-for-Treatment-and-Research-in-Multiple-Sclerosis (ECTRIMS) / 24th Annual Conference of Rehabilitation in MS, Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD, Pages: 110-111, ISSN: 1352-4585

Conference paper

Scalfari A, Pisani A, Romualdi C, Muraro P, Nicholas R, Calabrese Met al., 2019, Predictors of long term brain atrophy among multiple sclerosis patients, 5th Congress of the European-Academy-of-Neurology (EAN), Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 247-247, ISSN: 1351-5101

Conference paper

Uccelli A, Laroni A, Brundin L, Clanet M, Fernandez O, Nabavi SM, Muraro PA, Oliveri RS, Radue EW, Sellner J, Sorensen PS, Sormani MP, Wuerfel JT, Battaglia MA, Freedman MSet al., 2019, MEsenchymal StEm cells for Multiple Sclerosis (MESEMS): a randomized, double blind, cross-over phase I/II clinical trial with autologous mesenchymal stem cells for the therapy of multiple sclerosis, Trials, Vol: 20, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 1745-6215

BackgroundMultiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system with a degenerative component, leading to irreversible disability. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to prevent inflammation and neurodegeneration in animal models of MS, but no large phase II clinical trials have yet assessed the exploratory efficacy of MSC for MS.Methods/designThis is an academic, investigator-initiated, randomized, double-blind, placebo-compared phase I/II clinical trial with autologous, bone-marrow derived MSC in MS. Enrolled subjects will receive autologous MSC at either baseline or at week 24, through a cross-over design. Primary co-objectives are to test safety and efficacy of MSC treatment compared to placebo at 6 months. Secondary objectives will evaluate the efficacy of MSC at clinical and MRI levels. In order to overcome funding constraints, the MEsenchymal StEm cells for Multiple Sclerosis (MESEMS) study has been designed to merge partially independent clinical trials, following harmonized protocols and sharing some key centralized procedures, including data collection and analyses.DiscussionResults will provide patients and the scientific community with data on the safety and efficacy of MSC for MS. The innovative approach utilized to obtain funds to support the MESEMS trial could represent a new model to circumvent limitation of funds encountered by academic trials.

Journal article

This data is extracted from the Web of Science and reproduced under a licence from Thomson Reuters. You may not copy or re-distribute this data in whole or in part without the written consent of the Science business of Thomson Reuters.

Request URL: http://wlsprd.imperial.ac.uk:80/respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Request URI: /respub/WEB-INF/jsp/search-html.jsp Query String: respub-action=search.html&id=00497822&limit=30&person=true