Imperial College London

ProfessorPaulFrench

Faculty of Natural SciencesDepartment of Physics

Professor of Physics and Vice Dean (Research) - FoNS
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 7706paul.french Website

 
 
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Assistant

 

Ms Judith Baylis +44 (0)20 7594 7713

 
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Location

 

609Blackett LaboratorySouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

507 results found

Kalita R, Flanagan W, Lightley J, Kumar S, Alexandrov Y, Garcia E, Hintze M, Barkoulas M, Dunsby C, French PMWet al., 2021, Single-shot phase contrast microscopy using polarisation-resolved differential phase contrast, JOURNAL OF BIOPHOTONICS, ISSN: 1864-063X

Journal article

Lightley J, Gorlitz F, Kumar S, Kalita R, Kolbeinsson A, Garcia E, Alexandrov Y, Bousgouni V, Wysoczanski R, Barnes P, Donnelly L, Bakal C, Dunsby C, Neil MAA, Flaxman S, French PMWet al., 2021, Robust deep learning optical autofocus system applied to automated multiwell plate single molecule localization microscopy, JOURNAL OF MICROSCOPY, ISSN: 0022-2720

Journal article

Garcia E, Lightley J, Kumar S, Kalita R, Gorlitz F, Alexandrov Y, Cook T, Dunsby C, Neil MAA, Roufosse CA, French PMWet al., 2021, Application of direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) to the histological analysis of human glomerular disease, JOURNAL OF PATHOLOGY CLINICAL RESEARCH, Vol: 7, Pages: 438-445

Journal article

Cannon T, Lagarto J, Dyer B, Garcia Castano E, Kelly D, Peters N, Lyon A, French P, Dunsby Cet al., 2021, Characterisation of NADH fluorescence properties under one-photon excitation with respect to temperature, pH and binding to lactate dehydrogenase, Optical Society of America Continuum, Vol: 4, Pages: 1610-1625

Reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) is the principal electron donor in glycolysis and oxidative metabolism and is thus recognized as a key biomarker for probing metabolic state. While the fluorescence characteristics of NADH have been investigated extensively, there are discrepancies in the published data due to diverse experimental conditions, instrumentation and microenvironmental parameters that can affect NADH fluorescence. Using a cuvette-based time-resolved spectrofluorimeter employing one-photon excitation at 375 nm, we characterized the fluorescence intensity, lifetime, spectral response, anisotropy and time-resolved anisotropy of NADH in aqueous solution under varying microenvironmental conditions, namely temperature, pH, and binding to lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Our results demonstrate how temperature, pH, and binding partners each impact the fluorescence signature of NADH and highlight the complexity of the fluorescence data when different parameters produce competing effects. We hope that the data presented in this study will provide a reference for potential sources of variation in experiments measuring NADH fluorescence.

Journal article

Jones DC, Alexandrov Y, Curry N, Kumar S, Lanigan PMP, McGuinness CD, Dale MW, Twitchen DJ, Fisher D, Neil MAA, Dunsby C, French PMWet al., 2021, Multidimensional spectroscopy and imaging of defects in synthetic diamond: excitation-emission-lifetime luminescence measurements with multiexponential fitting and phasor analysis, Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol: 54, Pages: 1-13, ISSN: 0022-3727

We report the application of phasor analysis and nonlinear iterative fitting to complex spatial and spectroscopic luminescence decay data obtained from multidimensional microscopy of a CVD diamond grown on a HPHT substrate. This spectral and lifetime-resolved analysis enabled spatial mapping of variations in concentrations of nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in both charge states and the quenching of NV− defects, as well as the identification of SiV− luminescence. These imaging and spectroscopic modalities may be important for reliable fabrication of quantum devices based on such defects in diamond, which will require well-defined and characterised quantum electronic properties.

Journal article

Jones B, McGlone ER, Fang Z, Pickford P, Corrêa IR, Oishi A, Jockers R, Inoue A, Kumar S, Görlitz F, Dunsby C, French PMW, Rutter GA, Tan TM, Tomas A, Bloom SRet al., 2021, Genetic and biased agonist-mediated reductions in β-arrestin recruitment prolong cAMP signalling at glucagon family receptors, Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol: 296, Pages: 1-15, ISSN: 0021-9258

Receptors for the peptide hormones glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1R), glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIPR) and glucagon (GCGR) are important regulators of insulin secretion and energy metabolism. GLP-1R agonists have been successfully deployed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, but it has been suggested that their efficacy is limited by target receptor desensitisation and downregulation due to recruitment of β-arrestins. Indeed, recently described GLP-1R agonists with reduced β-arrestin-2 recruitment have delivered promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. We therefore aimed to determine if the same phenomenon could apply to the closely related GIPR and GCGR. In HEK293 cells depleted of both β-arrestin isoforms the duration of G protein-dependent cAMP/PKA signalling was increased in response to the endogenous ligand for each receptor. Moreover, in wild-type cells, “biased” GLP-1, GCG and GIP analogues with selective reductions in β-arrestin-2 recruitment led to reduced receptor endocytosis and increased insulin secretion over a prolonged stimulation period, although the latter effect was only seen at high agonist concentrations. Biased GCG analogues increased the duration of cAMP signalling, but this did not lead to increased glucose output from hepatocytes. Our study provides a rationale for development of GLP-1R, GIPR and GCGR agonists with reduced β-arrestin recruitment, but further work is needed to maximally exploit this strategy for therapeutic purposes.

Journal article

Wysoczanski R, Baker JR, Fenwick P, Garcia E, Kumar S, Neil MAA, Dunsby C, French PMW, Barnes PJ, Donnelly LEet al., 2020, Analysis of defective phagocytosis in COPD using super-resolution microscopy and automated bacterial quantification, Publisher: EUROPEAN RESPIRATORY SOC JOURNALS LTD, ISSN: 0903-1936

Conference paper

Georgiadou E, Haythorne E, Dickerson MT, Lopez-Noriega L, Pullen TJ, da Silva Xavier G, Davis SPX, Martinez-Sanchez A, Semplici F, Rizzuto R, McGinty JA, French PM, Cane MC, Jacobson DA, Leclerc I, Rutter GAet al., 2020, The pore-forming subunit MCU of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter is required for normal glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro and in vivo in mice, Diabetologia, Vol: 63, Pages: 1368-1381, ISSN: 0012-186X

Aims/hypothesisMitochondrial oxidative metabolism is central to glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). Whether Ca2+ uptake into pancreatic beta cell mitochondria potentiates or antagonises this process is still a matter of debate. Although the mitochondrial Ca2+ importer (MCU) complex is thought to represent the main route for Ca2+ transport across the inner mitochondrial membrane, its role in beta cells has not previously been examined in vivo.MethodsHere, we inactivated the pore-forming subunit of the MCU, encoded by Mcu, selectively in mouse beta cells using Ins1Cre-mediated recombination. Whole or dissociated pancreatic islets were isolated and used for live beta cell fluorescence imaging of cytosolic or mitochondrial Ca2+ concentration and ATP production in response to increasing glucose concentrations. Electrophysiological recordings were also performed on whole islets. Serum and blood samples were collected to examine oral and i.p. glucose tolerance.ResultsGlucose-stimulated mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation (p< 0.05), ATP production (p< 0.05) and insulin secretion (p< 0.01) were strongly inhibited in beta cell-specific Mcu-null (βMcu-KO) animals, in vitro, as compared with wild-type (WT) mice. Interestingly, cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations increased (p< 0.001), whereas mitochondrial membrane depolarisation improved in βMcu-KO animals. βMcu-KO mice displayed impaired in vivo insulin secretion at 5 min (p< 0.001) but not 15 min post-i.p. injection of glucose, whilst the opposite phenomenon was observed following an oral gavage at 5 min. Unexpectedly, glucose tolerance was improved (p< 0.05) in young βMcu-KO (<12 weeks), but not in older animals vs WT mice.Conclusions/interpretationMCU is crucial for mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in pancreatic beta cells and is required for normal GSIS. The apparent compensatory mechanisms that maintain glucose tolerance in βMcu-KO mice remain

Journal article

Fang Z, Chen S, Pickford P, Broichhagen J, Hodson DJ, Corrêa IR, Kumar S, Görlitz F, Dunsby C, French PMW, Rutter GA, Tan T, Bloom SR, Tomas A, Jones Bet al., 2020, The influence of peptide context on signaling and trafficking of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor biased agonists, ACS Pharmacology & Translational Science, Vol: 3, Pages: 345-360, ISSN: 2575-9108

Signal bias and membrane trafficking have recently emerged as important considerations in the therapeutic targeting of the glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) in type 2 diabetes and obesity. In the present study, we have evaluated a peptide series with varying sequence homology between native GLP-1 and exendin-4, the archetypal ligands on which approved GLP-1R agonists are based. We find notable differences in agonist-mediated cyclic AMP signaling, recruitment of β-arrestins, endocytosis, and recycling, dependent both on the introduction of a His → Phe switch at position 1 and the specific midpeptide helical regions and C-termini of the two agonists. These observations were linked to insulin secretion in a beta cell model and provide insights into how ligand factors influence GLP-1R function at the cellular level.

Journal article

Lagarto JL, Nickdel MB, Kelly DJ, Price A, Nanchahal J, Dunsby C, French P, Itoh Yet al., 2020, Autofluorescence lifetime reports cartilage damage in osteoarthritis, Scientific Reports, Vol: 10, ISSN: 2045-2322

Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common arthritis and its hallmark is degradation of articular cartilage by proteolytic enzymes leading to loss of joint function. It is challenging to monitor the status of cartilage in vivo and this study explores the use of autofluorescence lifetime (AFL) measurements to provide a label-free optical readout of cartilage degradation that could enable earlier detection and evaluation of potential therapies. We previously reported that treatment of ex vivo porcine cartilage with proteolytic enzymes resulted in decreased AFL. Here we report changes in AFL of ex vivo mouse knee joints, porcine metacarpophalangeal joints, normal human metatarsophalangeal articular tissue and human OA tibial plateau tissues measured with or without treatment using a compact single-point time resolved spectrofluorometer. Our data show that proteolytically damaged areas in porcine metacarpophalangeal joints present a reduced AFL and that inducing aggrecanases in mouse and human joints also significantly reduces AFL. Further, human cartilage from OA patients presents a significantly lower AFL compared to normal human cartilage. Our data suggest that AFL can detect areas of cartilage erosion and may potentially be utilised as a minimally-invasive diagnostic readout for early stage OA in combination with arthroscopy devices.

Journal article

Garcia E, Guo W, Kumar S, Gorlitz F, Sparks H, Alexandrov Y, Munro I, Kelly DJ, Warren S, Chennell G, Sardini A, Carling D, Thorpe P, Dunsby C, French PMWet al., 2020, FLIM, FRET and high content analysis, Symposium on Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences XX held at SPIE BiOS Conference, Publisher: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, ISSN: 0277-786X

Conference paper

Gorlitz F, Wysoczanski R, Kumar S, Lightley J, Garcia E, Alexandrov Y, Munro I, Johnson S, Kehoe M, Hollick C, Graham J, Donnelly L, Barnes P, Dunsby C, Neil MAA, French PMWet al., 2020, Towards easier, faster super-resolved microscopy, Conference on Single Molecule Spectroscopy and Superresolution Imaging XIII, Publisher: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, ISSN: 0277-786X

Conference paper

Davis SPX, Kumar S, Alexandrov Y, Bhargava A, da Silva Xavier G, Rutter GA, Frankel P, Sahai E, Flaxman S, French PMW, McGinty Jet al., 2019, Convolutional neural networks for reconstruction of undersampled optical projection tomography data applied to in vivo imaging of zebrafish., Journal of Biophotonics, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1864-063X

Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a 3D mesoscopic imaging modality that can utilize absorption or fluorescence contrast. 3D images can be rapidly reconstructed from tomographic data sets sampled with sufficient numbers of projection angles using the Radon transform, as is typically implemented with optically cleared samples of the mm-to-cm scale. For in vivo imaging, considerations of phototoxicity and the need to maintain animals under anesthesia typically preclude the acquisition of OPT data at a sufficient number of angles to avoid artifacts in the reconstructed images. For sparse samples, this can be addressed with iterative algorithms to reconstruct 3D images from undersampled OPT data, but the data processing times present a significant challenge for studies imaging multiple animals. We show here that convolutional neural networks (CNN) can be used in place of iterative algorithms to remove artifacts - reducing processing time for an undersampled in vivo zebrafish dataset from 77 to 15 minutes. We also show that using CNN produces reconstructions of equivalent quality to CS with 40% fewer projections. We further show that diverse training data classes, for example ex vivo mouse tissue data, can be used for CNN-based reconstructions of OPT data of other species including live zebrafish.

Journal article

Corcoran D, Juskaite V, Xu Y, Gorlitz F, Alexandrov Y, Dunsby C, French P, Leitinger Bet al., 2019, DDR1 autophosphorylation is a result of aggregation into dense clusters, Scientific Reports, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2045-2322

The collagen receptor DDR1 is a receptor tyrosine kinase that promotes progression ofa wide range of human disorders. Little is known about how ligand binding triggers DDR1 kinase activity. We previously reported that collagen induces DDR1 activation through lateral dimer association and phosphorylation between dimers, a process that requires specific transmembrane association. Here we demonstrate ligand-induced DDR1 clustering by widefield and super-resolution imaging and provide evidence for a mechanism whereby DDR1 kinase activity is determined by its molecular density. Ligand binding resulted in initial DDR1 reorganisation into morphologically distinct clusters with unphosphorylated DDR1. Further compaction over time led to clusters with highly aggregated and phosphorylated DDR1. Ligand-induced DDR1 clustering was abolished by transmembrane mutations but did not require kinase activity. Our results significantly advance our understanding of the molecular events underpinning ligand-induced DDR1 kinase activity and provide an explanation for the unusually slow DDR1 activation kinetics.

Journal article

Jones DC, Kumar S, Lanigan PMP, McGuinness CD, Dale MW, Twitchen DJ, Fisher D, Martineau PM, Neil M, Dunsby C, French Pet al., 2019, Multidimensional luminescence microscope for imaging defect colour centres in diamond, Methods and Applications in Fluorescence, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2050-6120

We report a multidimensional luminescence microscope providing hyperspectral imaging and time-resolved (luminescence lifetime) imaging for the study of luminescent diamond defects. The instrument includes crossed-polariser white light transmission microscopy to reveal any birefringence that would indicate strain in the diamond lattice. We demonstrate the application of this new instrument to defects in natural and synthetic diamonds including N3, nitrogen and silicon vacancies. Hyperspectral imaging provides contrast that is not apparent in conventional intensity images and the luminescence lifetime provides further contrast.

Journal article

Lagarto J, Dyer B, Dunsby C, Peters N, French P, Dunsby C, Lyon Aet al., 2019, In vivo label-free optical monitoring of structural and metabolic remodeling of myocardium following infarction, Biomedical Optics Express, Vol: 10, Pages: 3506-3521, ISSN: 2156-7085

Cardiac remodeling following myocardial infarction (MI) involves structural and functional alterations in the infarcted and remote viable myocardium that can ultimately lead to heart failure. The underlying mechanisms are not fully understood and, following our previous study of the autofluorescence lifetime and diffuse reflectance signatures of the myocardium in vivo at 16 weeks post MI in rats [Biomed. Opt. Express 6(2), 324 (2015)], we here present data obtained at 1, 2 and 4 weeks post myocardial infarction that help follow the temporal progression of these changes. Our results demonstrate that both structural and metabolic changes in the heart can be monitored from the earliest time points following MI using label-free optical readouts, not only in the region of infarction but also in the remote non-infarcted myocardium. Changes in the autofluorescence intensity and lifetime parameters associated with collagen type I autofluorescence were indicative of progressive collagen deposition in tissue that was most pronounced at earlier time points and in the region of infarction. In addition to significant collagen deposition in infarcted and non-infarcted myocardium, we also report changes in the autofluorescence parameters associated with reduced nicotinamide adenine (phosphate) dinucleotide (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), which we associate with metabolic alterations throughout the heart. Parallel measurements of the diffuse reflectance spectra indicated an increased contribution of reduced cytochrome c. Our findings suggest that combining time-resolved spectrofluorometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy could provide a useful means to monitor cardiac function in vivo at the time of surgery.

Journal article

Guo W, Kumar S, Gorlitz F, garcia EC, Alexandrov Y, Munro I, Kelly D, Warren S, Thorpe P, Dunsby C, French Pet al., 2019, Automated fluorescence lifetime imaging high content analysis of Förster resonance energy transfer between endogenously-labeled kinetochore proteins in live budding yeast cells, Slas Technology, Vol: 24, Pages: 308-320, ISSN: 2472-6303

We describe an open-source automated multiwell plate fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) methodology to read out Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescent proteins (FPs) labeling endogenous kinetochore proteins (KPs) in live budding yeast cells. The low copy number of many KPs and their small spatial extent present significant challenges for the quantification of donor fluorescence lifetime in the presence of significant cellular autofluorescence and photobleaching. Automated FLIM data acquisition was controlled by µManager and incorporated wide-field time-gated imaging with optical sectioning to reduce background fluorescence. For data analysis, we used custom MATLAB-based software tools to perform kinetochore foci segmentation and local cellular background subtraction and fitted the fluorescence lifetime data using the open-source FLIMfit software. We validated the methodology using endogenous KPs labeled with mTurquoise2 FP and/or yellow FP and measured the donor fluorescence lifetimes for foci comprising 32 kinetochores with KP copy numbers as low as ~2 per kinetochore under an average labeling efficiency of 50%. We observed changes of median donor lifetime ≥250 ps for KPs known to form dimers. Thus, this FLIM high-content analysis platform enables the screening of relatively low-copy-number endogenous protein–protein interactions at spatially confined macromolecular complexes.

Journal article

Munro I, Garcia EAC, Yan M, Guldbrand S, Kumar S, Kwakwa K, Dunsby C, Neil M, French Pet al., 2019, Accelerating single molecule localisation microscopy through parallel processing on a high-performance computing cluster, Journal of Microscopy, Vol: 273, Pages: 148-160, ISSN: 1365-2818

Super‐resolved microscopy techniques have revolutionized the ability to study biological structures below the diffraction limit. Single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM) techniques are widely used because they are relatively straightforward to implement and can be realized at relatively low cost, e.g. compared to laser scanning microscopy techniques. However, while the data analysis can be readily undertaken using open source or other software tools, large SMLM data volumes and the complexity of the algorithms used often lead to long image data processing times that can hinder the iterative optimization of experiments. There is increasing interest in high throughput SMLM, but its further development and application is inhibited by the data processing challenges. We present here a widely applicable approach to accelerating SMLM data processing via a parallelized implementation of ThunderSTORM on a high‐performance computing (HPC) cluster and quantify the speed advantage for a four‐node cluster (with 24 cores and 128 GB RAM per node) compared to a high specification (28 cores, 128 GB RAM, SSD‐enabled) desktop workstation. This data processing speed can be readily scaled by accessing more HPC resources. Our approach is not specific to ThunderSTORM and can be adapted for a wide range of SMLM software.

Journal article

Gorlitz F, Lightley J, Kumar S, Garcia E, Yan M, Wysoczanski R, Alexandrov Y, Baker JR, Barnes PJ, Munro I, Donnelly LE, Dunsby C, Neil MAA, French PMWet al., 2019, Automated multiwell plate STORM: towards open source super-resolved high content analysis, Conference on Advances in Microscopic Imaging II, Publisher: SPIE-INT SOC OPTICAL ENGINEERING, ISSN: 0277-786X

Conference paper

French P, Davis S, Wisniewski L, Kumar S, Correia T, Arridge S, Frankel P, McGinty Jet al., 2018, Slice-illuminated optical projection tomography, Optics Letters, Vol: 43, Pages: 5555-5558, ISSN: 0146-9592

To improve the imaging performance of optical projection tomography (OPT) in live samples, we have explored a parallelized implementation of semi-confocal line illumination and detection to discriminate against scattered photons. Slice-illuminated OPT (sl-OPT) improves reconstruction quality in scattering samples by reducing interpixel crosstalk at the cost of increased acquisition time. For in vivo imaging, this can be ameliorated through the use of compressed sensing on angularly undersampled OPT data sets. Here, we demonstrate sl-OPT applied to 3D imaging of bead phantoms and live adult zebrafish.

Journal article

Gorlitz F, Guldbrand S, Runcorn T, Murray R, Jaso-Tamame A, Sinclair H, Martinez-Perez E, Taylor J, Neil M, Dunsby CW, French Pet al., 2018, easySLM-STED: stimulated emission depletion microscopy with aberration correction, extended field of view and multiple beam scanning, Journal of Biophotonics, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1864-063X

We demonstrate a simplified set‐up for STED microscopy with a straightforward alignment procedure that uses a single spatial light modulator (SLM) with collinear incident excitation and depletion beams to provide phase modulation of the beam profiles and correction of optical aberrations. We show that this approach can be used to extend the field of view for STED microscopy by correcting chromatic aberration that otherwise leads to walk‐off between the focused excitation and depletion beams. We further show how this arrangement can be adapted to increase the imaging speed through multibeam excitation and depletion. Fine adjustments to the alignment can be accomplished using the SLM only, conferring the potential for automation.

Journal article

Lagarto J, Dyer B, Talbot C, Peters N, French P, Lyon A, Dunsby Cet al., 2018, Characterization of NAD(P)H and FAD autofluorescence signatures in a Langendorff isolated-perfused rat heart model, Biomedical Optics Express, Vol: 9, Pages: 4978-4978, ISSN: 2156-7085

Autofluorescence spectroscopy is a promising label-free approach to characterize biological samples with demonstrated potential to report structural and biochemical alterations in tissues in a number of clinical applications. We report a characterization of the ex vivo autofluorescence fingerprint of cardiac tissue, exploiting a Langendorff-perfused isolated rat heart model to induce physiological insults to the heart, with a view to understanding how metabolic alterations affect the autofluorescence signals. Changes in the autofluorescence intensity and lifetime signatures associated with reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) were characterized during oxygen- or glucose-depletion protocols. Results suggest that both NAD(P)H and FAD autofluorescence intensity and lifetime parameters are sensitive to changes in the metabolic state of the heart owing to oxygen deprivation. We also observed changes in NAD(P)H fluorescence intensity and FAD lifetime parameter on reperfusion of oxygen, which might provide information on reperfusion injury, and permanent tissue damage or changes to the tissue during recovery from oxygen deprivation. We found that changes in the autofluorescence signature following glucose-depletion are, in general, less pronounced, and most clearly visible in NAD(P)H related parameters. Overall, the results reported in this investigation can serve as baseline for future investigations of cardiac tissue involving autofluorescence measurements.

Journal article

Sparks H, Kondo H, Hooper S, Munro I, Kennedy G, Dunsby C, French P, Sahai Eet al., 2018, Heterogeneity in tumor chromatin-doxorubicin binding revealed by in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging confocal endomicroscopy, Nature Communications, Vol: 9, ISSN: 2041-1723

We present an approach to quantify drug-target engagement using in vivo fluorescence endomicroscopy, validated with in vitro measurements. Doxorubicin binding to chromatin changes the fluorescence lifetime of histone-GFP fusions that we measure in vivo at single-cell resolution using a confocal laparo/endomicroscope. We measure both intra- and inter-tumor heterogeneity in doxorubicin chromatin engagement in a model of peritoneal metastasis of ovarian cancer, revealing striking variation in the efficacy of doxorubicin-chromatin binding depending on intra-peritoneal or intravenous delivery. Further, we observe significant variations in doxorubicin-chromatin binding between different metastases in the same mouse and between different regions of the same metastasis. The quantitative nature of fluorescence lifetime imaging enables direct comparison of drug-target engagement for different drug delivery routes and between in vitro and in vivo experiments. This uncovers different rates of cell killing for the same level of doxorubicin binding in vitro and in vivo.

Journal article

Alexandrov Y, Nikolic DS, Dunsby C, French PMWet al., 2018, Quantitative time domain analysis of lifetime-based FRET measurements with fluorescent proteins: static random isotropic fluorophore orientation distributions, Journal of Biophotonics, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1864-063X

Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) measurements are widely used to obtain information about molecular interactions and conformations through the dependence of FRET efficiency on the proximity of donor and acceptor fluorophores. Fluorescence lifetime measurements can provide quantitative analysis of FRET efficiency and interacting population fraction. Many FRET experiments exploit the highly specific labelling of genetically expressed fluorescent proteins, applicable in live cells and organisms. Unfortunately, the typical assumption of fast randomization of fluorophore orientations in the analysis of fluorescence lifetime-based FRET readouts is not valid for fluorescent proteins due to their slow rotational mobility compared to their upper state lifetime. Here, previous analysis of effectively static isotropic distributions of fluorophore dipoles on FRET measurements is incorporated into new software for fitting donor emission decay profiles. Calculated FRET parameters, including molar population fractions, are compared for the analysis of simulated and experimental FRET data under the assumption of static and dynamic fluorophores and the intermediate regimes between fully dynamic and static fluorophores, and mixtures within FRET pairs, is explored. Finally, a method to correct the artefact resulting from fitting the emission from static FRET pairs with isotropic angular distributions to the (incorrect) typically assumed dynamic FRET decay model is presented.

Journal article

Wisniewski L, Davis S, Lockwood N, Mcginty J, French P, Frankel Pet al., 2018, A role for p130Cas in venous sprouting and lymphangiogenesis in the zebrafish, 5th Congress of the ESC-Council-on-Basic-Cardiovascular-Science on Frontiers in Cardio Vascular Biology, Publisher: OXFORD UNIV PRESS, Pages: S90-S90, ISSN: 0008-6363

Conference paper

Rutter GA, Haythorne EA, Georgiadou E, Xavier GDS, Pullen TJ, Rizzuto R, Martinez-Sanchez A, McGinty JA, French PMet al., 2018, Pancreatic beta cell-selective deletion of the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU) impairs glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in vitro but not in vivo, Publisher: WILEY, Pages: 42-42, ISSN: 0742-3071

Conference paper

Kim Y, Warren S, Favero F, Stone J, Clegg J, Neil M, Paterson C, Knight J, French P, Dunsby CWet al., 2018, Semi-random multicore fibre design for adaptive multiphoton endoscopy, Optics Express, Vol: 26, Pages: 3661-3673, ISSN: 1094-4087

This paper reports the development, modelling and application of a semi-random multicore fibre (MCF) design for adaptive multiphoton endoscopy. The MCF was constructed from 55 sub-units, each comprising 7 single mode cores, in a hexagonally close-packed lattice where each sub-unit had a random angular orientation. The resulting fibre had 385 single mode cores and was double-clad for proximal detection of multiphoton excited fluorescence. The random orientation of each sub-unit in the fibre reduces the symmetry of the positions of the cores in the MCF, reducing the intensity of higher diffracted orders away from the central focal spot formed at the distal tip of the fibre and increasing the maximum size of object that can be imaged. The performance of the MCF was demonstrated by imaging fluorescently labelled beads with both distal and proximal fluorescence detection and pollen grains with distal fluorescence detection. We estimate that the number of independent resolution elements in the final image – measured as the half-maximum area of the two-photon point spread function divided by the area imaged – to be ~3200.

Journal article

Chen L, Li G, Li Y, Li Y, Zhu H, Tang L, French P, McGinty J, Ruan Set al., 2017, UbasM: An effective balanced optical clearing method for intact biomedical imaging, Scientific Reports, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2045-2322

Optical clearing methods can facilitate deep optical imaging in biological tissue by reducing light scattering and this has enabled accurate three-dimensional signal visualization and quantification of complex biological structures. Unfortunately, existing optical clearing approaches present a compromise between maximizing clearing capability, the preservation of fluorescent protein emission and membrane integrity and the speed of sample processing – with the latter typically requiring weeks for cm scale tissue samples. To address this challenge, we present a new, convenient, aqueous optical clearing agent, termed UbasM: Urea-Based Amino-Sugar Mixture, that rapidly renders fixed tissue samples highly transparent and reliably preserves emission from fluorescent proteins and lipophilic dyes in membrane integrity preserved tissues. UbasM is simple, inexpensive, reproducible and compatible with all labeling methods that we have encountered. It can enable convenient, volumetric imaging of tissue up to the scale of whole adult mouse organs and should be useful for a wide range of light microscopy and tomography techniques applied to biomedical research, especially the study on organism-level systems biology at multiple levels.

Journal article

Sherlock B, Warren SC, Alexandrov Y, Yu F, Stone J, Knight J, Neil MAA, Paterson C, French PMW, Dunsby CWet al., 2017, In vivo multiphoton microscopy using a handheld scanner with lateral and axial motion compensation, Journal of Biophotonics, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1864-063X

This paper reports a handheld multiphoton fluorescence microscope designed for clinical imaging that incorporates axial motion compensation and lateral image stabilization. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography is employed to track the axial position of the skin surface, and lateral motion compensation is realised by imaging the speckle pattern arising from the optical coherence tomography beam illuminating the sample. Our system is able to correct lateral sample velocities of up to ~65 μm s-1. Combined with the use of negative curvature microstructured optical fibre to deliver tunable ultrafast radiation to the handheld multiphoton scanner without the need of a dispersion compensation unit, this instrument has potential for a range of clinical applications. The system is used to compensate for both lateral and axial motion of the sample when imaging human skin in vivo.

Journal article

Gorlitz F, Corcoran DS, Garcia Castano EA, Leitinger B, Neil MAA, Dunsby CW, French PMWet al., 2017, Mapping molecular function to biological nanostructure: combining structured illumination microscopy with fluorescence lifetime imaging (SIM+FLIM), Photonics, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2304-6732

We present a new microscope integrating super-resolved imaging using structured illumination microscopy (SIM) with wide-field optically sectioned fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to provide optical mapping of molecular function and its correlation with biological nanostructure below the conventional diffraction limit. We illustrate this SIM + FLIM capability to map FRET readouts applied to the aggregation of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1) in Cos 7 cells following ligand stimulation and to the compaction of DNA during the cell cycle.

Journal article

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