Imperial College London

DrPoppyLamberton

Faculty of MedicineSchool of Public Health

Honorary Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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Contact

 

poppy.lamberton CV

 
 
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Location

 

Praed StreetSt Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

79 results found

Kabbas-Pinango E, Arinaitwe M, van Dam GJJ, Moses A, Namukuta A, Nankasi AB, Mwima NK, Besigye F, Prada JM, Lamberton PHLet al., 2023, Reproducibility matters: intra- and inter-sample variation of the point-of-care circulating cathodic antigen test in two <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> endemic areas in Uganda, PHILOSOPHICAL TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 378, ISSN: 0962-8436

Journal article

Crellen T, Haswell M, Sithithaworn P, Sayasone S, Odermatt P, Lamberton PHL, Spencer SEF, Hollingsworth TDet al., 2023, Diagnosis of helminths depends on worm fecundity and the distribution of parasites within hosts, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY B-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES, Vol: 290, ISSN: 0962-8452

Journal article

Lamberton P, 2023, Wicked-Schisto: The wicked public health problem of Schistosomiasis and the interdisciplinary research helping to control it, Open Access Government, Vol: 37, Pages: 188-191

<jats:sec> <jats:title>Wicked-Schisto: The wicked public health problem of Schistosomiasis and the interdisciplinary research helping to control it</jats:title> <jats:p>Over 240 million people have schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease (NTD), caused by parasitic worms called Schistosoma. Over 90% of infected people live in sub-Saharan Africa. Most have long-term subtle morbidities such as abdominal pain, fatigue and diahorrea. Symptoms often overlap with other diseases found in the same areas, including malaria and intestinal worms. This results in complex, hard-to-monitor illnesses, making it difficult to know when a drug treatment or other intervention is successfully improving population health. The disease also reduces physical and cognitive development, school and work attendance and productivity, exacerbating the poverty cycle. Chronic infections cause severe organ damage, cancer and ~200,000 deaths a year. Despite 1 in 33 people in the world being infected and these devastating effects, control efforts lag behind diseases such as malaria, HIV and TB. Here Poppy Lamberton, Professor of Global Health at the University of Glasgow, explores how she is leading an interdisciplinary team aiming to identify cost-effective, sustainable interventions for schistosomiasis, a devastating neglected tropical disease.</jats:p> </jats:sec>

Journal article

Mujumbusi L, Nalwadda E, Ssali A, Pickering L, Seeley J, Meginnis K, Lamberton PHLet al., 2023, Understanding perceptions of schistosomiasis and its control among highly endemic lakeshore communities in Mayuge, Uganda, PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, Vol: 17, ISSN: 1935-2735

Journal article

Meginnis K, Hanley N, Mujumbusi L, Pickering L, Lamberton PHLet al., 2022, Using choice modelling to identify popular and affordable alternative interventions for schistosomiasis in Uganda, ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS, Vol: 27, Pages: 578-600, ISSN: 1355-770X

Journal article

Clark J, Arinaitwe M, Nankasi A, Faust CL, Moses A, Ajambo D, Besigye F, Atuhaire A, Wamboko A, Carruthers L, Francoeur R, Tukahebwe EM, Prada JM, Lamberton PHLet al., 2022, Reconciling Egg- and Antigen-Based Estimates of Schistosoma mansoni Clearance and Reinfection: A Modeling Study, CLINICAL INFECTIOUS DISEASES, Vol: 74, Pages: 1557-1563, ISSN: 1058-4838

Journal article

Janoušková E, Clark J, Kajero O, Alonso S, Lamberton PHL, Betson M, Prada JMet al., 2022, Public Health Policy Pillars for the Sustainable Elimination of Zoonotic Schistosomiasis

<jats:p>Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease acquired through contact with contaminated freshwater. The definitive hosts are terrestrial mammals, including humans, with some Schistosoma species crossing the animal-human boundary through zoonotic transmission. An estimated 12 million people live at risk of zoonotic schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi, largely in the World Health Organization&amp;rsquo;s Western Pacific Region and in Indonesia. Mathematical models have played a vital role in our understanding of the biology, transmission, and impact of intervention strategies, however, these have mostly focused on non-zoonotic Schistosoma species. Whilst these non-zoonotic-based models capture some aspects of zoonotic schistosomiasis transmission dynamics, the commonly-used frameworks are yet to adequately capture the complex epi-ecology of multi-host zoonotic transmission. However, overcoming these knowledge gaps goes beyond transmission dynamics modelling. To improve model utility and enhance zoonotic schistosomiasis control programmes, we highlight three pillars that we believe are vital to sustainable interventions at the implementation (community) and policy-level, and discuss the pillars in the context of a One-Health approach, recognising the interconnection between humans, animals and their shared environment. These pillars are: (1) human and animal epi-ecological understanding; (2) economic considerations (such as treatment costs and animal losses); and (3) sociological understanding, including inter- and intra-human and animal interactions. These pillars must be built on a strong foundation of trust, support and commitment of stakeholders and involved institutions.</jats:p>

Journal article

Janoušková E, Clark J, Kajero O, Alonso S, Lamberton PHL, Betson M, Prada JMet al., 2022, Public Health Policy Pillars for the Sustainable Elimination of Zoonotic Schistosomiasis

<jats:p>Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease acquired through contact with contaminated freshwater. The definitive hosts are terrestrial mammals, including humans, with some Schistosoma species crossing the animal-human boundary through zoonotic transmission. An estimated 12 million people live at risk of zoonotic schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma mekongi, largely in the World Health Organization&amp;rsquo;s Western Pacific Region and in Indonesia. Mathematical models have played a vital role in our understanding of the biology, transmission, and impact of intervention strategies, however, these have mostly focused on non-zoonotic Schistosoma species. Whilst these non-zoonotic-based models capture some aspects of zoonotic schistosomiasis transmission dynamics, the commonly-used frameworks are yet to adequately capture the complex epi-ecology of multi-host zoonotic transmission. However, overcoming these knowledge gaps goes beyond transmission dynamics modelling. To improve model utility and enhance zoonotic schistosomiasis control programmes, we highlight three pillars that we believe are vital to sustainable interventions at the implementation (community) and policy-level, and discuss the pillars in the context of a One-Health approach, recognising the interconnection between humans, animals and their shared environment. These pillars are: (1) human and animal epi-ecological understanding; (2) economic considerations (such as treatment costs and animal losses); and (3) sociological understanding, including inter- and intra-human and animal interactions.</jats:p>

Journal article

Trienekens SCM, Faust CL, Besigye F, Pickering L, Tukahebwa EM, Seeley J, Lamberton PHLet al., 2022, Variation in water contact behaviour and risk of <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> (re)infection among Ugandan school-aged children in an area with persistent high endemicity, PARASITES & VECTORS, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1756-3305

Journal article

Sun M-T, Gu M-M, Zhang J-Y, Yu Q-F, Lamberton PHL, Lu D-Bet al., 2022, Meta-analysis of variable-temperature PCR technique performance for diagnosising <i>Schistosoma japonicum</i> infections in humans in endemic areas, PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, Vol: 16, ISSN: 1935-2735

Journal article

Francoeur R, Atuhaire A, Arinaitwe M, Adriko M, Ajambo D, Nankasi A, Babayan SA, Lamberton PHLet al., 2021, ABO Blood Groups Do Not Predict <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> Infection Profiles in Highly Endemic Villages of Uganda, MICROORGANISMS, Vol: 9

Journal article

Arinaitwe M, Adriko M, Kibwika B, Tukahebwa EM, Faust CL, Lamberton PHLet al., 2021, Residence Time, Water Contact, and Age-driven<i> Schistosoma</i><i> mansoni</i> Infection in Hotspot Communities in Uganda, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, Vol: 105, Pages: 1772-1781, ISSN: 0002-9637

Journal article

Alonso S, Janouskova E, McIntosh E, Prada J, Lamberton Pet al., 2021, THE CRUCIAL ROLE OF ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF WATER, SANITATION AND HYGIENE ON REDUCING SCHISTOSOMIASIS BURDEN IN UGANDA, Publisher: AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE, Pages: 266-267, ISSN: 0002-9637

Conference paper

Meginnis K, Hanley N, Mujumbusi L, Pickering L, Lamberton Pet al., 2021, USING CHOICE MODELLING TO IDENTIFY POPULAR AND AFFORDABLE ALTERNATIVE INTERVENTIONS FOR SCHISTOSOMIASIS IN UGANDA, Publisher: AMER SOC TROP MED & HYGIENE, Pages: 267-267, ISSN: 0002-9637

Conference paper

Ayabina DV, Clark J, Bayley H, Lamberton PHL, Toorid J, Hollingsworth TDet al., 2021, Gender-related differences in prevalence, intensity and associated risk factors of <i>Schistosoma</i> infections in Africa: A systematic review and meta-analysis, PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1935-2735

Journal article

Ssali A, Pickering L, Nalwadda E, Mujumbusi L, Seeley J, Lamberton PHLet al., 2021, Schistosomiasis messaging in endemic communities: Lessons and implications for interventions from rural Uganda, a rapid ethnographic assessment study, PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, Vol: 15, ISSN: 1935-2735

Journal article

Berger DJ, Crellen T, Lamberton PHL, Allan F, Tracey A, Noonan JD, Kabatereine NB, Tukahebwa EM, Adriko M, Holroyd N, Webster JP, Berriman M, Cotton JAet al., 2021, Whole-genome sequencing of <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> reveals extensive diversity with limited selection despite mass drug administration, NATURE COMMUNICATIONS, Vol: 12

Journal article

Champion TS, Connelly S, Smith CJ, Lamberton PHLet al., 2021, Monitoring schistosomiasis and sanitation interventions-The potential of environmental DNA, WILEY INTERDISCIPLINARY REVIEWS-WATER, Vol: 8, ISSN: 2049-1948

Journal article

Faust CL, Brunker K, Ajambo D, Ryan M, Moses A, Rowel C, Wangoola RM, Wampande EM, Guma A, Adriko M, Lamberton PHL, Tukahebwa EM, Mugenyi A, Waiswa Cet al., 2021, Harnessing technology and portability to conduct molecular epidemiology of endemic pathogens in resource-limited settings, TRANSACTIONS OF THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF TROPICAL MEDICINE AND HYGIENE, Vol: 115, Pages: 3-5, ISSN: 0035-9203

Journal article

Faust CL, Osakunor DNM, Downs JA, Kayuni S, Stothard JR, Lamberton PHL, Reinhard-Rupp J, Rollinson Det al., 2020, Schistosomiasis Control: Leave No Age Group Behind, TRENDS IN PARASITOLOGY, Vol: 36, Pages: 582-591, ISSN: 1471-4922

Journal article

Trienekens SCM, Faust CL, Meginnis K, Pickering L, Ericsson O, Nankasi A, Moses A, Tukahebwa EM, Lamberton PHLet al., 2020, Impacts of host gender on <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> risk in rural Uganda-A mixed-methods approach, PLOS NEGLECTED TROPICAL DISEASES, Vol: 14, ISSN: 1935-2735

Journal article

Meginnis K, Hanley N, Mujumbusi L, Lamberton PHLet al., 2020, Non-monetary numeraires: Varying the payment vehicle in a choice experiment for health interventions in Uganda, ECOLOGICAL ECONOMICS, Vol: 170, ISSN: 0921-8009

Journal article

Faust CL, Crotti M, Moses A, Oguttu D, Wamboko A, Adriko M, Adekanle EK, Kabatereine N, Tukahebwa EM, Norton AJ, Gower CM, Webster JP, Lamberton PHLet al., 2019, Two-year longitudinal survey reveals high genetic diversity of <i>Schistosoma mansoni</i> with adult worms surviving praziquantel treatment at the start of mass drug administration in Uganda, PARASITES & VECTORS, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1756-3305

Journal article

Carruthers L, Moses A, Adriko M, Faust CL, Tukahebwa EM, Hall LJ, Ranford-Cartwright LC, Lamberton PHLet al., 2019, The impact of storage conditions on human stool 16S rRNA microbiome composition and diversity, PEERJ, Vol: 7, ISSN: 2167-8359

Journal article

Grillet ME, Hernandez-Villena JV, Llewellyn MS, Paniz-Mondolfi AE, Tami A, Vincenti-Gonzalez MF, Marquez M, Mogollon-Mendoza AC, Hernandez-Pereira CE, Plaza-Morr JD, Blohm G, Grijalva MJ, Costales JA, Ferguson HM, Schwabl P, Hernandez-Castro LE, Lamberton PHL, Streicker DG, Haydon DT, Miles MA, Acosta-Serrano A, Acquattela H, Basanez MG, Benaim G, Colmenares LA, Conn JE, Espinoza R, Freilij H, Graterol-Gil MC, Hotez PJ, Kato H, Lednicky JA, Martinez CE, Mas-Coma S, Morris JG, Navarro JC, Ramirez JL, Rodriguez M, Urbina JA, Villegas L, Segovia MJ, Carrasco HJ, Crainey JL, Luz SLB, Moreno JD, Gonzalez OON, Ramirez JD, Alarcon-de Noya Bet al., 2019, Venezuela's humanitarian crisis, resurgence of vector-borne diseases, and implications for spillover in the region, Lancet Infectious Diseases, Vol: 19, Pages: E149-E161, ISSN: 1473-3099

In the past 5–10 years, Venezuela has faced a severe economic crisis, precipitated by political instability and declining oil revenue. Public health provision has been affected particularly. In this Review, we assess the impact of Venezuela's health-care crisis on vector-borne diseases, and the spillover into neighbouring countries. Between 2000 and 2015, Venezuela witnessed a 359% increase in malaria cases, followed by a 71% increase in 2017 (411 586 cases) compared with 2016 (240 613). Neighbouring countries, such as Brazil, have reported an escalating trend of imported malaria cases from Venezuela, from 1538 in 2014 to 3129 in 2017. In Venezuela, active Chagas disease transmission has been reported, with seroprevalence in children (<10 years), estimated to be as high as 12·5% in one community tested (n=64). Dengue incidence increased by more than four times between 1990 and 2016. The estimated incidence of chikungunya during its epidemic peak is 6975 cases per 100 000 people and that of Zika virus is 2057 cases per 100 000 people. The re-emergence of many vector-borne diseases represents a public health crisis in Venezuela and has the possibility of severely undermining regional disease elimination efforts. National, regional, and global authorities must take action to address these worsening epidemics and prevent their expansion beyond Venezuelan borders.

Journal article

Krauth SJ, Balen J, Gobert GN, Lamberton PHLet al., 2019, A call for systems epidemiology to tackle the complexity of Schistosomiasis, its control, and its elimination, Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease, Vol: 4, ISSN: 2414-6366

Ever since the first known written report of schistosomiasis in the mid-19th century, researchers have aimed to increase knowledge of the parasites, their hosts, and the mechanisms contributing to infection and disease. This knowledge generation has been paramount for the development of improved intervention strategies. Yet, despite a broad knowledge base of direct risk factors for schistosomiasis, there remains a paucity of information related to more complex, interconnected, and often hidden drivers of transmission that hamper intervention successes and sustainability. Such complex, multidirectional, non-linear, and synergistic interdependencies are best understood by looking at the integrated system as a whole. A research approach able to address this complexity and find previously neglected causal mechanisms for transmission, which include a wide variety of influencing factors, is needed. Systems epidemiology, as a holistic research approach, can integrate knowledge from classical epidemiology, with that of biology, ecology, social sciences, and other disciplines, and link this with informal, tacit knowledge from experts and affected populations. It can help to uncover wider-reaching but difficult-to-identify processes that directly or indirectly influence exposure, infection, transmission, and disease development, as well as how these interrelate and impact one another. Drawing on systems epidemiology to address persisting disease hotspots, failed intervention programmes, and systematically neglected population groups in mass drug administration programmes and research studies, can help overcome barriers in the progress towards schistosomiasis elimination. Generating a comprehensive view of the schistosomiasis system as a whole should thus be a priority research agenda towards the strategic goal of morbidity control and transmission elimination.

Journal article

Adriko M, Faust CL, Carruthers LV, Moses A, Tukahebwa EM, Lamberton PHLet al., 2018, Low praziquantel treatment coverage for schistosoma mansoni in Mayuge District, Uganda, due to the absence of treatment opportunities, rather than systematic non-compliance, Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease, Vol: 3, ISSN: 2414-6366

The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends praziquantel mass drug administration (MDA) to control schistosomiasis in endemic regions. We aimed to quantify recent and lifetime praziquantel coverage, and reasons for non-treatment, at an individual level to guide policy recommendations to help Uganda reach WHO goals. Cross-sectional household surveys (n = 681) encompassing 3208 individuals (adults and children) were conducted in 2017 in Bugoto A and B, Mayuge District, Uganda. Participants were asked if they had received praziquantel during the recent MDA (October 2016) and whether they had ever received praziquantel in their lifetime. A multivariate logistic regression analysis with socio-economic and individual characteristics as covariates was used to determine factors associated with praziquantel uptake. In the MDA eligible population (≥5 years of age), the most recent MDA coverage was 48.8%. Across individuals' lifetimes, 31.8% of eligible and 49.5% of the entire population reported having never taken praziquantel. Factors that improved individuals' odds of taking praziquantel included school enrolment, residence in Bugoto B and increasing years of village-residency. Not being offered (49.2%) and being away during treatment (21.4%) were the most frequent reasons for not taking the 2016 praziquantel MDA. Contrary to expectations, chronically-untreated individuals were rarely systematic non-compliers, but more commonly not offered treatment.

Journal article

Pitaksakulrat O, Webster BL, Webster JP, Laha T, Saijuntha W, Lamberton PHL, Kiatsopit N, Andrews RH, Petney TN, Sithithaworn Pet al., 2018, Phylogenetic relationships within the <i>Opisthorchis viverrini</i> species complex with specific analysis of <i>O-viverrini</i> sensu lato from Sakon Nakhon, Thailand by mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequencing, INFECTION GENETICS AND EVOLUTION, Vol: 62, Pages: 86-94, ISSN: 1567-1348

Journal article

Jourdan PM, Lamberton PHL, Fenwick A, Addiss DGet al., 2018, <i>Strongyloides stercoralis</i>: the need for accurate information reply, LANCET, Vol: 391, Pages: 2323-2323, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

Jourdan PM, Lamberton PHL, Fenwick A, Addiss DGet al., 2018, Soil-transmitted helminth infections, LANCET, Vol: 391, Pages: 252-265, ISSN: 0140-6736

Journal article

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