Imperial College London

DrRashaAl-Lamee

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Clinical Senior Lecturer
 
 
 
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r.al-lamee13

 
 
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Block B Hammersmith HospitalHammersmith Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

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54 results found

Nowbar AN, Francis DP, Al-Lamee RK, 2021, Quality of Life Assessment in Trials of Revascularization for Chronic Stable Angina: Insights from ORBITA and the Implications of Blinding, CARDIOVASCULAR DRUGS AND THERAPY, ISSN: 0920-3206

Journal article

Al-Lamee R, Mintz GS, 2021, What are the PROSPECTs and clinical implications of vulnerable plaque?, Eur Heart J

Journal article

Rajkumar C, Shun-Shin M, Seligman H, Ahmad Y, Warisawa T, Cook C, Howard J, Ganesananthan S, Amarin L, Khan C, Ahmed A, Nowbar A, Foley M, Assomull R, Keenan N, Sehmi J, Keeble T, davies J, Tang K, Gerber R, Cole G, O'Kane P, Sharp A, Khamis R, Kanaganayagam G, Petraco R, Ruparelia N, Malik I, Nijjer S, Sen S, Francis D, Al-Lamee Ret al., 2021, Placebo-controlled efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention for focal and diffuse patterns of stable coronary artery disease, Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol: 14, Pages: 809-818, ISSN: 1941-7640

Background Physiological assessment with pressure wire pullback can characterize coronary artery disease (CAD) with a focal or diffuse pattern. However, the clinical relevance of this distinction is unknown. We use data from ORBITA to test if the pattern of CAD predicts the placebo-controlled efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on stress echocardiography ischemia and symptom endpoints.Methods164 patients in ORBITA underwent blinded instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) pullback assessment prior to randomization. Focal disease was defined as 0.03 iFR unit drop within 15mm, rather than over a longer distance. Analyses were performed using regression modelling. ResultsIn the PCI arm (n=85), 48 were focal and 37 were diffuse. In the placebo arm (n=79), 35 were focal and 44 were diffuse. Focal stenoses were associated with significantly lower fractional flow reserve (FFR) and iFR values than diffusely diseased vessels (focal mean FFR and iFR 0.600.15 and 0.650.24, diffuse 0.780.10 and 0.880.08 respectively, p<0.0001). With adjustment for this difference, PCI for focal stenoses resulted in significantly greater reduction in stress echo ischemia than PCI for diffuse disease (p<0.05). The effect of PCI on between-arm pre-randomization-adjusted exercise time was 9.32 seconds (95% CI, -17.1 to 35.7s; p=0.487). When stratified for pattern of disease, there was no detectable difference between focal and diffuse CAD (Pinteraction=0.700). PCI improved Seattle Angina Questionnaire angina frequency score and freedom from angina more than placebo (p=0.034; p=0.0035). However, there was no evidence of interaction between the physiological pattern of CAD and these effects (Pinteraction=0.436; Pinteraction=0.908).ConclusionPCI achieved significantly greater reduction of stress echocardiography ischemia in focal compared to diffuse CAD. However, for symptom endpoints, no such difference was observed.

Journal article

Mikhail G, Khawaja SA, Mohan P, Jabbour R, Bampouri T, Bowsher G, Hassan AMM, Huq F, Baghdasaryan L, Wang B, Sethi A, Sen S, Petraco R, Ruparelia N, Nijjer S, Malik IS, Foale R, Bellamy M, Kooner J, Rana BS, Cole G, Sutaria N, Kanaganayagam G, Nihoyannopoulos P, Fox K, Plymen CM, Pabari P, Howard L, Davies R, Hajoi G, Lo Giudice F, Kanagaratnam P, Anderson J, Chukwuemeka A, Khamis R, Varnava A, Baker CSR, Francis D, Asaria P, Al-Lamee Ret al., 2021, COVID-19 and its impact on the cardiovascular system, Open Heart, Vol: 8, Pages: 1-9, ISSN: 2053-3624

Objectives: The clinical impact of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has varied across countries with varying cardiovascular manifestations. We review the cardiac presentations, in-hospital outcomes and development of cardiovascular complications in the initial cohort of SARS-CoV-2 positive patients at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, United Kingdom.Methods: We retrospectively analysed 498 COVID-19 positive adult admissions to our institute from 7th March to 7th April 2020. Patient data was collected for baseline demographics, co-morbidities and in-hospital outcomes, especially relating to cardiovascular intervention.Results:Mean age was 67.4±16.1 years and 62.2%(n=310) were male. 64.1%(n=319) of our cohort had underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) with 53.4%(n=266) having hypertension. 43.2%(n=215) developed acute myocardial injury. Mortality was significantly increased in those patients with myocardial injury (47.4% vs 18.4%,p<0.001). Only 4 COVID-19 patients had invasive coronary angiography,2 underwent percutaneous coronary intervention and 1 required a permanent pacemaker implantation. 7.0%(n=35) of patients had an inpatient echocardiogram. Acute myocardial injury (OR 2.39,1.31-4.40,p=0.005) and history of hypertension (OR 1.88 ,1.01-3.55,p=0.049) approximately doubled the odds of in-hospital mortality in patients admitted with COVID-19 after other variables had been controlled for.Conclusion:Hypertension, pre-existing CVD and acute myocardial injury were associated with increased in-hospital mortality in our cohort of COVID-19 patients. However, only a low number of patients required invasive cardiac intervention.

Journal article

Foley M, Rajkumar CA, Shun-Shin M, Ganesananthan S, Seligman H, Howard J, Nowbar AN, Keeble TR, Davies JR, Tang KH, Gerber R, O'Kane P, Sharp ASP, Petraco R, Malik IS, Nijjer S, Sen S, Francis DP, Al-Lamee Ret al., 2021, Achieving optimal medical therapy: insights from the ORBITA trial., Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol: 10, Pages: 1-20, ISSN: 2047-9980

Background In stable coronary artery disease, medications are used for 2 purposes: cardiovascular risk reduction and symptom improvement. In clinical trials and clinical practice, medication use is often not optimal. The ORBITA (Objective Randomised Blinded Investigation With Optimal Medical Therapy of Angioplasty in Stable Angina) trial was the first placebo-controlled trial of percutaneous coronary intervention. A key component of the ORBITA trial design was the inclusion of a medical optimization phase, aimed at ensuring that all patients were treated with guideline-directed truly optimal medical therapy. In this study, we report the medical therapy that was achieved. Methods and Results After enrollment into the ORBITA trial, all 200 patients entered a 6-week period of intensive medical therapy optimization, with initiation and uptitration of risk reduction and antianginal therapy. At the prerandomization stage, the median number of antianginals established was 3 (interquartile range, 2-4). A total of 195 patients (97.5%) reached the prespecified target of ≥2 antianginals; 136 (68.0%) did not stop any antianginals because of adverse effects, and the median number of antianginals stopped for adverse effects per patient was 0 (interquartile range, 0-1). Amlodipine and bisoprolol were well tolerated (stopped for adverse effects in 4/175 [2.3%] and 9/167 [5.4%], respectively). Ranolazine and ivabradine were also well tolerated (stopped for adverse effects in 1/20 [5.0%] and 1/18 [5.6%], respectively). Isosorbide mononitrate and nicorandil were stopped for adverse effects in 36 of 172 (20.9%) and 32 of 141 (22.7%) of patients, respectively. Statins were well tolerated and taken by 191 of 200 (95.5%) patients. Conclusions In the 12-week ORBITA trial period, medical therapy was successfully optimized and well tolerated, with few drug adverse effects leading to therapy cessation. Truly optimal medical therapy can be achieved in clinical trials, and translating this i

Journal article

Ahmad Y, Kane C, Arnold AD, Cook C, Keene D, Shun-Shin M, Cole G, Al-Lamee R, Francis D, Howard Jet al., 2021, Randomized blinded placebo-controlled trials of renal sympathetic denervation for hypertension: a meta-analysis, Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine, ISSN: 1553-8389

BackgroundThe efficacy of renal denervation has been controversial, but the procedure has now undergone several placebo-controlled trials. New placebo-controlled trial data has recently emerged, with longer follow-up of one trial and the full report of another trial (which constitutes 27% of the total placebo-controlled trial data). We therefore sought to evaluate the effect of renal denervation on ambulatory and office blood pressures in patients with hypertension.MethodsWe systematically identified all blinded placebo-controlled randomized trials of catheter-based renal denervation for hypertension. The primary efficacy outcome was ambulatory systolic blood pressure change relative to placebo. A random-effects meta-analysis was performed.Results6 studies randomizing 1232 patients were eligible. 713 patients were randomized to renal denervation and 519 to placebo. Renal denervation significantly reduced ambulatory systolic blood pressure (−3.52 mmHg; 95% CI −4.94 to −2.09; p < 0.0001), ambulatory diastolic blood pressure (−1.93 mmHg; 95% CI −3.04 to −0.83, p = 0.0006), office systolic blood pressure size (−5.10 mmHg; 95% CI −7.31 to −2.90, p < 0.0001) and office diastolic pressure (effect size −3.11 mmHg; 95% CI −4.43 to −1.78, p < 0.0001). Adverse events were rare and not more common with denervation.ConclusionsThe totality of blinded, randomized placebo-controlled data shows that renal denervation is safe and provides genuine reduction in blood pressure for at least 6 months post-procedure. If this effect continues in the long term, renal denervation might provide a life-long 10% relative risk reduction in major adverse cardiac events and 7.5% relative risk reduction in all-cause mortality.

Journal article

Naderi H, Robinson S, Swaans MJ, Bual N, Cheung W-S, Reid L, Shun-Shin M, Asaria P, Pabari P, Cole G, Kanaganayagam GS, Sutaria N, Bellamy M, Fox K, Nihoyannopoulos P, Petraco R, Al-Lamee R, Nijjer SS, Sen S, Ruparelia N, Baker C, Mikhail G, Malik I, Khamis R, Varnava A, Francis D, Mayet J, Rana Bet al., 2021, Adapting the role of handheld echocardiography during the COVID-19 pandemic: A practical guide, PERFUSION-UK, ISSN: 0267-6591

Journal article

Seligman H, Sen S, Nijjer S, Al-Lamee R, Clifford P, Sethi A, Hadjiloizou N, Kaprielian R, Ramrakha P, Bellamy M, Khan MA, Kooner J, Foale RA, Mikhail G, Baker CS, Mayet J, Malik I, Khamis R, Francis D, Petraco Ret al., 2020, Management of Acute Coronary Syndromes During the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Pandemic: Deviations from Guidelines and Pragmatic Considerations for Patients and Healthcare Workers, Interventional Cardiology Review, Vol: 15, Pages: e16-e16, ISSN: 1756-1477

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is forcing cardiology departments to rapidly adapt existing clinical guidelines to a new reality and this is especially the case for acute coronary syndrome pathways. In this focused review, the authors discuss how COVID-19 is affecting acute cardiology care and propose pragmatic guideline modifications for the diagnosis and management of acute coronary syndrome patients, particularly around the appropriateness of invasive strategies as well as length of hospital stay. The authors also discuss the use of personal protective equipment for healthcare workers in cardiology. Based on shared global experiences and growing peer-reviewed literature, it is possible to put in place modified acute coronary syndrome treatment pathways to offer safe pragmatic decisions to patients and staff.

Journal article

Ganesananthan S, Rajkumar C, Shun-Shin M, Nowbar A, Foley M, Seligman H, Wensel R, Davies J, Francis D, Al-Lamee RKet al., 2020, Ventilatory Gas Exchange in Stable Coronary Artery Disease, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Ganesananthan S, Rajkumar C, Shun-Shin M, Nowbar A, Foley M, Seligman H, Wensel R, Davies J, Francis D, Al-Lamee RKet al., 2020, Exercise Capacity as a Predictor of the Placebo-controlled Efficacy of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Stable Coronary Artery Disease: The Ventilatory Gas Exchange-stratified Analysis of ORBITA, Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Kunadian V, Chieffo A, Camici PG, Berry C, Escaned J, Maas A, Prescott E, Karam N, Appelman Y, Fraccaro C, Buchanan GL, Manzo-Silberman S, Al-Lamee R, Regar E, Lansky A, Abbott JD, Badimon L, Duncker DJ, Mehran R, Capodanno D, Baumbach Aet al., 2020, An EAPCI Expert Consensus Document on Ischaemia with Non-Obstructive Coronary Arteries in Collaboration with European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Coronary Pathophysiology & Microcirculation Endorsed by Coronary Vasomotor Disorders International Study Group, EUROPEAN HEART JOURNAL, Vol: 41, Pages: 3504-+, ISSN: 0195-668X

Journal article

Teoh Z, Al-Lamee RK, 2020, COURAGE, ORBITA, and ISCHEMIA: Percutaneous Coronary Intervention for Stable Coronary Artery Disease., Interv Cardiol Clin, Vol: 9, Pages: 469-482

This review article summarizes key landmark trials that have shaped understanding of the role of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in stable coronary artery disease (CAD). The relationship between stenosis, ischemia, and angina is more complex than first imagined. Anginal relief remains the primary indication for PCI in stable CAD. The first placebo-controlled PCI trial showed a surprisingly small effect size, suggesting a significant placebo effect. PCI in stable CAD has not been shown to improve mortality or overall myocardial infarction rates, even in the presence of significant ischemia. Rather, risk reduction medical therapy remains the main intervention for improving outcomes.

Journal article

Warisawa T, Cook CM, Rajkumar C, Howard JP, Seligman H, Ahmad Y, El Hajj S, Doi S, Nakajima A, Nakayama M, Goto S, Vera-Urquiza R, Sato T, Kikuta Y, Kawase Y, Nishina H, Petraco R, Al-Lamee R, Nijjer S, Sen S, Nakamura S, Lerman A, Matsuo H, Francis DP, Akashi YJ, Escaned J, Davies JEet al., 2020, Safety of Revascularization Deferral of Left Main Stenosis Based on Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Evaluation, JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Vol: 13, Pages: 1655-1664, ISSN: 1936-8798

Journal article

Ahmad Y, 2020, Complete revascularisation by percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and multivessel coronary artery disease: an updated meta-analysis and meta-regression of randomized trials, Journal of the American Heart Association, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-83, ISSN: 2047-9980

BackgroundFor patients with ST‐segment–elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and multivessel coronary artery disease, the optimal treatment of the non‐infarct‐related artery has been controversial. This up‐to‐date meta‐analysis focusing on individual clinical end points was performed to further evaluate the benefit of complete revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention for patients with STEMI and multivessel coronary artery disease.Methods and ResultsWe systematically identified all randomized trials comparing complete revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention to culprit‐only revascularization for multivessel disease in STEMI and performed a random‐effects meta‐analysis. The primary efficacy end point was cardiovascular death analyzed on an intention‐to‐treat basis. Secondary end points included all‐cause mortality, myocardial infarction, and unplanned revascularization. Ten studies (7542 patients) were included: 3664 patients were randomized to complete revascularization and 3878 to culprit‐only revascularization. Across all patients, complete revascularization was superior to culprit‐only revascularization for reduction in the risk of cardiovascular death (relative risk [RR], 0.68; 95% CI, 0.47–0.98; P=0.037; I2=21.8%) and reduction in the risk of myocardial infarction (RR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.54–0.79; P<0.0001; I2=0.0%). Complete revascularization also significantly reduced the risk of unplanned revascularization (RR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.28–0.51; P<0.0001; I2=64.7%). The difference in all‐cause mortality with percutaneous coronary intervention was not statistically significant (RR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69–1.04; P=0.108; I2=0.0%).ConclusionsFor patients with STEMI and multivessel disease, complete revascularization with percutaneous coronary intervention significantly improves hard clinical outcomes including cardiovascular death and myocardial infarction. These data have implications for clinical practice gu

Journal article

Cook CM, Howard JP, Ahmad Y, Shun-Shin MJ, Sethi A, Clesham GJ, Tang KH, Nijjer SS, Kelly PA, Davies JR, Malik IS, Kaprielian R, Mikhail G, Petraco R, Warisawa T, Al-Janabi F, Karamasis GV, Mohdnazri S, Gamma R, de Waard GA, Al-Lamee R, Keeble TR, Mayet J, Sen S, Francis DP, Davies JEet al., 2020, How Do Fractional Flow Reserve, Whole-Cycle PdPa, and Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio Correlate With Exercise Coronary Flow Velocity During Exercise-Induced Angina?, CIRCULATION-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1941-7640

Journal article

Chacko L, P Howard J, Rajkumar C, Nowbar AN, Kane C, Mahdi D, Foley M, Shun-Shin M, Cole G, Sen S, Al-Lamee R, Francis DP, Ahmad Yet al., 2020, Effects of percutaneous coronary intervention on death and myocardial infarction stratified by stable and unstable coronary artery disease: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, Vol: 13, ISSN: 1941-7705

Background:In patients presenting with ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction, percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) reduces mortality when compared with fibrinolysis. In other forms of coronary artery disease (CAD), however, it has been controversial whether PCI reduces mortality. In this meta-analysis, we examine the benefits of PCI in (1) patients post–myocardial infarction (MI) who did not receive immediate revascularization; (2) patients who have undergone primary PCI for ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction but have residual coronary lesions; (3) patients who have suffered a non–ST-segment–elevation acute coronary syndrome; and (4) patients with truly stable CAD with no recent infarct. This analysis includes data from the recently presented International Study of Comparative Health Effectiveness with Medical and Invasive Approaches (ISCHEMIA) and Complete versus Culprit-Only Revascularization Strategies to Treat Multivessel Disease after Early PCI for STEMI (COMPLETE) trials.Methods and Results:We systematically identified all randomized trials of PCI on a background of medical therapy for the treatment of CAD. The ISCHEMIA trial, presented in November 2019, was eligible for inclusion. Data were combined using a random-effects meta-analysis. The primary end point was all-cause mortality. Forty-six trials, including 37 757 patients, were eligible. In the 3 unstable scenarios, PCI had the following effects on mortality: unrevascularized post-MI relative risk (RR) 0.68 (95% CI, 0.45–1.03); P=0.07; multivessel disease following ST-segment–elevation myocardial infarction (RR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.69–1.04]; P=0.11); non–ST-segment–elevation acute coronary syndrome (RR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.72–0.97]; P=0.02). Overall, in these unstable scenarios PCI was associated with a significant reduction in mortality (RR, 0.84 [95% CI, 0.75–0.93]; P=0.02). In unstable CAD, PCI also reduced cardiac

Journal article

Al-lamee RK, Shun-Shin M, Howard J, Nowbar A, Rajkumar C, Thompson D, Sen S, Nijjer S, Petraco R, Davies J, Keeble T, Tang K, Malik I, Bual N, Cook C, Ahmad Y, Seligman H, Sharp A, Talwar S, Assomull R, Cole G, Keenan NG, Kanaganayagam GS, Sehmi JS, Wensel R, Harrell F, Mayet J, Thom S, Davies JE, Francis Det al., 2019, Dobutamine Stress Echocardiography Ischaemia as a Predictor of the Placebo-Controlled Efficacy of Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Stable Coronary Artery Disease: The Stress Echo-Stratified Analysis of ORBITA, Resuscitation Science Symposium (ReSS), Publisher: LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, Pages: E985-E985, ISSN: 0009-7322

Conference paper

Ahmad Y, Vendrik J, Eftekhari A, Howard J, Cook C, Rajkumar C, Malik I, Mikhail G, Ruparelia N, Hadjiloizou N, Nijjer S, Al-Lamee R, Petraco R, Warisawa T, Wijntjens GWM, Koch KT, van de Hoef T, de Waard G, Echavarria-Pinto M, Frame A, Sutaria N, Kanaganayagam G, Ariff B, Anderson J, Chukwuemeka A, Fertleman M, Koul S, Iglesias JF, Francis D, Mayet J, Serruys P, Davies J, Escaned J, van Royen N, Götberg M, Terkelsen CJ, Christiansen CH, Piek JJ, Baan Jr J, Sen Set al., 2019, Determining the Predominant Lesion in Patients With Severe Aortic Stenosis and Coronary Stenoses: A Multicenter Study Using Intracoronary Pressure and Flow, Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1941-7640

Background:Patients with severe aortic stenosis (AS) often have coronary artery disease. Both the aortic valve and the coronary disease influence the blood flow to the myocardium and its ability to respond to stress; leading to exertional symptoms. In this study, we aim to quantify the effect of severe AS on the coronary microcirculation and determine if this is influenced by any concomitant coronary disease. We then compare this to the effect of coronary stenoses on the coronary microcirculation.Methods:Group 1: 55 patients with severe AS and intermediate coronary stenoses treated with transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) were included. Group 2: 85 patients with intermediate coronary stenoses and no AS treated with percutaneous coronary intervention were included. Coronary pressure and flow were measured at rest and during hyperemia in both groups, before and after TAVI (group 1) and before and after percutaneous coronary intervention (group 2).Results:Microvascular resistance over the wave-free period of diastole increased significantly post-TAVI (pre-TAVI, 2.71±1.4 mm Hg·cm·s−1 versus post-TAVI 3.04±1.6 mm Hg·cm·s−1 [P=0.03]). Microvascular reserve over the wave-free period of diastole significantly improved post-TAVI (pre-TAVI 1.88±1.0 versus post-TAVI 2.09±0.8 [P=0.003]); this was independent of the severity of the underlying coronary stenosis. The change in microvascular resistance post-TAVI was equivalent to that produced by stenting a coronary lesion with an instantaneous wave-free ratio of ≤0.74.Conclusions:TAVI improves microcirculatory function regardless of the severity of underlying coronary disease. TAVI for severe AS produces a coronary hemodynamic improvement equivalent to the hemodynamic benefit of stenting coronary stenoses with instantaneous wave-free ratio values <0.74. Future trials of physiology-guided revascularization in severe AS may consider us

Journal article

Al-Lamee R, Shun-Shin M, Howard J, Nowbar A, Rajkumar C, Thompson D, Sen S, Nijjer S, Petraco R, Davies J, Keeble T, Tang K, Malik I, Bual N, Cook C, Ahmad Y, Seligman H, Sharp A, Gerber R, Talwar S, Assomull R, Cole G, Keenan N, Kanaganayagam G, Sehmi J, Wensel R, Harrell Jr F, Mayet J, Thom S, Davies J, Francis Det al., 2019, Dobutamine stress echocardiography ischemia as a predictor of the placebo-controlled efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention in stable coronary artery disease: the stress echo-stratified analysis of ORBITA, Circulation, Vol: 140, Pages: 1971-1980, ISSN: 0009-7322

BackgroundDobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) is widely used to test for ischemia in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). In this analysis we studied the ability of pre-randomization stress echo score to predict the placebo-controlled efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) within the ORBITA trial. MethodsOne hundred and eighty-three patients underwent DSE before randomization. The stress echo score is broadly the number of segments abnormal at peak stress, with akinetic segments counting double and dyskinetic segments counting triple. The ability of pre-randomization stress echo to predict the placebo-controlled effect of PCI on response variables was tested using regression modelling.ResultsAt pre-randomization, the stress echo score was 1.561.77 in the PCI arm (n=98) and 1.611.73 in the placebo arm (n=85). There was a detectable interaction between pre-randomization stress echo score and the effect of PCI on angina frequency score with a larger placebo-controlled effect in patients with the highest stress echo score (pinteraction=0.031). With our sample size we were unable to detect an interaction between stress echo score and any other patient-reported response variables: freedom from angina (pinteraction=0.116), physical limitation (pinteraction=0.461), quality of life (pinteraction=0.689), EQ-5D-5L quality of life score (pinteraction=0.789) or between stress echo score and physician-assessed Canadian Cardiovascular Society angina class (pinteraction=0.693), and treadmill exercise time (pinteraction=0.426). ConclusionsThe degree of ischemia assessed by DSE predicts the placebo-controlled efficacy of PCI on patient-reported angina frequency. The greater the downstream stress echo abnormality caused by a stenosis, the greater the reduction in symptoms from PCI.

Journal article

Howard JP, Cook CM, van de Hoef TP, Meuwissen M, de Waard GA, van Lavieren MA, Echavarria-Pinto M, Danad I, Piek JJ, Gotberg M, Al-Lamee RK, Sen S, Nijjer SS, Seligman H, van Royen N, Knaapen P, Escaned J, Francis DP, Petraco R, Davies JEet al., 2019, Artificial Intelligence for Aortic Pressure Waveform Analysis During Coronary Angiography Machine Learning for Patient Safety, JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Vol: 12, Pages: 2093-2101, ISSN: 1936-8798

Journal article

Kim CH, Koo B-K, Dehbi H-M, Lee JM, Doh J-H, Nam C-W, Shin E-S, Cook CM, Al-Lamee R, Petraco R, Sen S, Malik IS, Nijjer SS, Mejia-Renteria H, Alegria-Barrero E, Alghamdi A, Altman J, Baptista SB, Bhindi R, Bojara W, Brugaletta S, Silva PC, Di Mario C, Erglis A, Gerber RT, Going O, Haerle T, Hellig F, Indolfi C, Janssens L, Jeremias A, Kharbanda RK, Khashaba A, Kikuta Y, Krackhardt F, Laine M, Lehman SJ, Matsuo H, Meuwissen M, Niccoli G, Piek JJ, Ribichini F, Samady H, Sapontis J, Seto AH, Sezer M, Sharp ASP, Singh J, Takashima H, Talwar S, Tanaka N, Tang K, Van Belle E, van Royen N, Vinhas H, Vrints CJ, Walters D, Yokoi H, Samuels B, Buller C, Patel MR, Serruys PW, Escaned J, Davies JEet al., 2019, Sex Differences in Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio or Fractional Flow Reserve-Guided Revascularization Strategy, JACC-CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONS, Vol: 12, Pages: 2035-2046, ISSN: 1936-8798

Journal article

Lee JM, Choi KH, Koo B-K, Dehbi H-M, Doh J-H, Nam C-W, Shin E-S, Cook CM, Al-Lamee R, Petraco R, Sen S, Malik IS, Nijjer SS, Mejia-Renteria H, Alegria-Barrero E, Alghamdi A, Altman J, Baptista SB, Bhindi R, Bojara W, Brugaletta S, Silva PC, Di Mario C, Erglis A, Gerber RT, Going O, Haerle T, Hellig F, Indolfi C, Janssens L, Jeremias A, Kharbanda RK, Khashaba A, Kikuta Y, Krackhardt F, Laine M, Lehman SJ, Matsuo H, Meuwissen M, Niccoli G, Piek JJ, Ribichini F, Samady H, Sapontis J, Seto AH, Sezer M, Sharp ASP, Singh J, Takashima H, Talwar S, Tanaka N, Tang K, Van Belle E, van Royen N, Vinhas H, Vrints CJ, Walters D, Yokoi H, Samuels B, Buller C, Patel MR, Serruys P, Escaned J, Davies JEet al., 2019, Comparison of Major Adverse Cardiac Events Between Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio and Fractional Flow Reserve-Guided Strategy in Patients With or Without Type 2 Diabetes: A Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial, JAMA CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 4, Pages: 857-864, ISSN: 2380-6583

Journal article

Nowbar AN, gitto M, Howard J, Francis D, Al-Lamee Ret al., 2019, Mortality from Ischaemic Heart Disease: analysis of data from the World Health Organization and coronary artery disease risk factors from NCD-RisC, Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, Vol: 12, ISSN: 1941-7705

BackgroundIschemic heart disease (IHD) has been considered the top cause of mortality globally. However, countries differ in their rates and there have been changes over time.Methods and ResultsWe analyzed mortality data submitted to the World Health Organization from 2005 to 2015 by individual countries. We explored patterns in relationships with age, sex, and income and calculated age-standardized mortality rates for each country in addition to crude death rates. In 5 illustrative countries which provided detailed data, we analyzed trends of mortality from IHD and 3 noncommunicable diseases (lung cancer, stroke, and chronic lower respiratory tract diseases) and examined the simultaneous trends in important cardiovascular risk factors. Russia, United States, and Ukraine had the largest absolute numbers of deaths among the countries that provided data. Among 5 illustrative countries (United Kingdom, United States, Brazil, Kazakhstan, and Ukraine), IHD was the top cause of death, but mortality from IHD has progressively decreased from 2005 to 2015. Age-standardized IHD mortality rates per 100 000 people per year were much higher in Ukraine (324) and Kazakhstan (97) than in United States (60), Brazil (54), and the United Kingdom (46), with much less difference in other causes of death. All 5 countries showed a progressive decline in IHD mortality, with a decline in smoking and hypertension and in all cases a rise in obesity and type II diabetes mellitus.ConclusionsIHD remains the single largest cause of death in countries of all income groups. Rates are different between countries and are falling in most countries, indicating great potential for further gains. On the horizon, future improvements may become curtailed by increasing hypertension in some developing countries and more importantly global growth in obesity.

Journal article

Cook CM, Ahmad Y, Howard JP, Shun-Shin MJ, Sethi A, Clesham GJ, Tang KH, Nijjer SS, Kelly PA, Davies JR, Malik IS, Kaprielian R, Mikhail G, Petraco R, Warisawa T, Al-Janabi F, Karamasis GV, Mohdnazri S, Gamma R, deWaard GA, Al-Lamee R, Keeble TR, Mayet J, Sen S, Francis DP, Davies JEet al., 2019, Association Between Physiological Stenosis Severity and Angina-Limited Exercise Time in Patients With Stable Coronary Artery Disease, JAMA CARDIOLOGY, Vol: 4, Pages: 569-574, ISSN: 2380-6583

Journal article

Seligman H, Shun-Shin M, Vasireddy A, Cook C, Ahmad Y, Howard J, Sen S, Al-Lamee R, Nijjer S, Chamie D, Davies J, Mayet J, Francis D, Petraco Ret al., 2019, Fractional flow reserve derived from microcatheters versus standard pressure wires: a stenosis-level meta-analysis, Open Heart, Vol: 6, ISSN: 2053-3624

Aims: To determine the agreement between sensor-tipped microcatheter (MC) and pressure wire (PW) derived Fractional Flow Reserve (FFR). Methods and results: Studies comparing FFR obtained from MC (FFRMC, Navvus Microcatheter System, ACIST Medical Systems, Minnesota, USA) versus standard PW (FFRPW) were identified and a meta-analysis of numerical and categorical agreement was performed. The relative levels of drift and device failure of MC and PW systems from each study were assessed. Six studies with 440 lesions (413 patients) were included. The mean overall bias between FFRMC and FFRPW was -0.029 (FFRMC lower). Bias and variance were greater for lesions with lower FFRPW (p <0.001). Using a cut-off of 0.80, 18% of lesions were re-classified by FFRMC versus FFRPW (with 15% being false-positives). The difference in reported drift between FFRPW and FFRMC was small. Device failure was more common with MC than PW (7.1% versus 2%). Conclusion: FFRMC systematically overestimates lesion severity, with increased bias in more severe lesions. Using FFRMC changes revascularisation guidance in approximately 1 out of every 5 cases. Pressure wire drift was similar between systems. Device failure was higher with MC.

Journal article

Sen S, Ahmad Y, Dehbi H-M, Howard JP, Iglesias JF, Al-Lamee R, Petraco R, Nijjer S, Bhindi R, Lehman S, Walters D, Sapontis J, Janssens L, Vrints CJ, Khashaba A, Laine M, Van Belle E, Krackhardt F, Bojara W, Going O, Härle T, Indolfi C, Niccoli G, Ribichini F, Tanaka N, Yokoi H, Takashima H, Kikuta Y, Erglis A, Vinhas H, Silva PC, Baptista SB, Alghamdi A, Hellig F, Koo B-K, Nam C-W, Shin E-S, Doh J-H, Brugaletta S, Alegria-Barrero E, Meuwissen M, Piek JJ, van Royen N, Sezer M, Di Mario C, Gerber RT, Malik IS, Sharp ASP, Talwar S, Tang K, Samady H, Altman J, Seto AH, Singh J, Jeremias A, Matsuo H, Kharbanda RK, Patel MR, Serruys P, Escaned J, Davies JE, Ahmad Yet al., 2019, Clinical events after deferral of LAD revascularization following physiological coronary assessment, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol: 73, Pages: 444-453, ISSN: 0735-1097

BACKGROUND: Physicians are not always comfortable deferring treatment of a stenosis in the left anterior descending (LAD) artery because of the perception that there is a high risk of major adverse cardiac events (MACE). The authors describe, using the DEFINE-FLAIR (Functional Lesion Assessment of Intermediate Stenosis to Guide Revascularisation) trial, MACE rates when LAD lesions are deferred, guided by physiological assessment using fractional flow reserve (FFR) or the instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR). OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to establish the safety of deferring treatment in the LAD using FFR or iFR within the DEFINE-FLAIR trial. METHODS: MACE rates at 1 year were compared between groups (iFR and FFR) in patients whose physiological assessment led to LAD lesions being deferred. MACE was defined as a composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI), and unplanned revascularization at 1 year. Patients, and staff performing follow-up, were blinded to whether the decision was made with FFR or iFR. Outcomes were adjusted for age and sex. RESULTS: A total of 872 patients had lesions deferred in the LAD (421 guided by FFR, 451 guided by iFR). The event rate with iFR was significantly lower than with FFR (2.44% vs. 5.26%; adjusted HR: 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.22 to 0.95; p = 0.04). This was driven by significantly lower unplanned revascularization with iFR and numerically lower MI (unplanned revascularization: 2.22% iFR vs. 4.99% FFR; adjusted HR: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.93; p = 0.03; MI: 0.44% iFR vs. 2.14% FFR; adjusted HR: 0.23; 95% CI: 0.05 to 1.07; p = 0.06). CONCLUSIONS: iFR-guided deferral appears to be safe for patients with LAD lesions. Patients in whom iFR-guided deferral was performed had statistically significantly lower event rates than those with FFR-guided deferral.

Journal article

Al-Lamee RK, Nowbar AN, Francis DP, 2019, Percutaneous coronary intervention for stable coronary artery disease, Heart, Vol: 105, Pages: 11-19, ISSN: 1355-6037

The adverse consequences of stable coronary artery disease (CAD) are death, myocardial infarction (MI) and angina. Trials in stable CAD show that percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) does not reduce mortality. PCI does appear to reduce spontaneous MI rates but at the expense of causing some periprocedural MI. Therefore, the main purpose of PCI is to relieve angina. Indeed, patients and physicians often choose PCI rather than first attempting to control symptoms with anti-anginal medications as recommended by guidelines. Nevertheless, it is unclear how effective PCI is at relieving angina. This is because, whereas anti-anginal medications are universally required to be tested against placebo, there is no such requirement for procedural interventions such as PCI. The first placebo-controlled trial of PCI showed a surprisingly small effect size. This may be because it is overly simplistic to assume that the presence of a stenosis and inducible ischaemia in a patient means that the clinical chest pain they report is caused by ischaemia. In this article, we review the evidence base and argue that if we as a medical specialty wish to lead the science of procedures for symptom control, we should recognise the special merit of placebo-controlled experiments.

Journal article

Buchanan GL, Mehilli J, Kunadian V, Radu MD, Chieffo Aet al., 2018, The invisible army of women in interventional cardiology: EAPCI Women mission to make them visible., EuroIntervention, Vol: 14, Pages: e1158-e1159

Journal article

Al-Lamee R, Howard JP, Shun-Shin MJ, Thompson D, Dehbi H-M, Sen S, Nijjer S, Petraco R, Davies J, Keeble T, Tang K, Malik IS, Cook C, Ahmad Y, Sharp ASP, Gerber R, Baker C, Kaprielian R, Talwar S, Assomull R, Cole G, Keenan NG, Kanaganayagam G, Sehmi J, Wensel R, Harrell FE, Mayet J, Thom SA, Davies JE, Francis DPet al., 2018, Fractional Flow Reserve and Instantaneous Wave-Free Ratio as Predictors of the Placebo-Controlled Response to Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Stable Single-Vessel Coronary Artery Disease., Circulation, Vol: 138, Pages: 1780-1792

BACKGROUND: There are no data on how fractional flow reserve (FFR) and instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) are associated with the placebo-controlled efficacy of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in stable single-vessel coronary artery disease. METHODS: We report the association between prerandomization invasive physiology within ORBITA (Objective Randomised Blinded Investigation With Optimal Medical Therapy of Angioplasty in Stable Angina), a placebo-controlled trial of patients who have stable angina with angiographically severe single-vessel coronary disease clinically eligible for PCI. Patients underwent prerandomization research FFR and iFR assessment. The operator was blinded to these values. Assessment of response variables, treadmill exercise time, stress echocardiography score, symptom frequency, and angina severity were performed at prerandomization and blinded follow-up. Effects were calculated by analysis of covariance. The ability of FFR and iFR to predict placebo-controlled changes in response variables was tested by using regression modeling. RESULTS: Invasive physiology data were available in 196 patients (103 PCI and 93 placebo). At prerandomization, the majority had Canadian Cardiovascular Society class II or III symptoms (150/196, 76.5%). Mean FFR and iFR were 0.69±0.16 and 0.76±0.22, respectively; 97% had ≥1 positive ischemia tests. The estimated effect of PCI on between-arm prerandomization-adjusted total exercise time was 20.7 s (95% confidence interval [CI], -4.0 to 45.5; P=0.100) with no interaction of FFR ( Pinteraction=0.318) or iFR ( Pinteraction=0.523). PCI improved stress echocardiography score more than placebo (1.07 segment units; 95% CI, 0.70-1.44; P<0.00001). The placebo-controlled effect of PCI on stress echocardiography score increased progressively with decreasing FFR ( Pinteraction<0.00001) and decreasing iFR ( Pinteraction<0.00001). PCI did not improve angina frequency score significantly more th

Journal article

Cook CM, Ahmad Y, Howard JP, Shun-Shin MJ, Sethi A, Clesham GJ, Tang KH, Nijjer SS, Kelly PA, Davies JR, Malik IS, Kaprielian R, Mikhail G, Petraco R, Al-Janabi F, Karamasis GV, Mohdnazri S, Gamma R, Al-Lamee R, Keeble TR, Mayet J, Sen S, Francis DP, Davies JE, Cook CM, Ahmad Y, James H, Shun-Shin M, Sethi A, Clesham G, Tang K, Nijjer S, Kelly P, Davies J, Malik I, Kaprielian R, Mikhail G, Petraco R, Al-Janabi F, Karamasis G, Mohdnazri S, Gamma R, Al-Lamee R, Keeble T, Mayet J, Sen S, Francis D, Davies Jet al., 2018, Impact of percutaneous revascularization on exercise hemodynamics in patients with stable coronary disease, Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol: 72, Pages: 970-983, ISSN: 0735-1097

BACKGROUND: Recently, the therapeutic benefits of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have been challenged in patients with stable coronary artery disease (SCD). OBJECTIVES: The authors examined the impact of PCI on exercise responses in the coronary circulation, the microcirculation, and systemic hemodynamics in patients with SCD. METHODS: A total of 21 patients (mean age 60.3 ± 8.4 years) with SCD and single-vessel coronary stenosis underwent cardiac catheterization. Pre-PCI, patients exercised on a supine ergometer until rate-limiting angina or exhaustion. Simultaneous trans-stenotic coronary pressure-flow measurements were made throughout exercise. Post-PCI, this process was repeated. Physiological parameters, rate-limiting symptoms, and exercise performance were compared between pre-PCI and post-PCI exercise cycles. RESULTS: PCI reduced ischemia as documented by fractional flow reserve value (pre-PCI 0.59 ± 0.18 to post-PCI 0.91 ± 0.07), instantaneous wave-free ratio value (pre-PCI 0.61 ± 0.27 to post-PCI 0.96 ± 0.05) and coronary flow reserve value (pre-PCI 1.7 ± 0.7 to post-PCI 3.1 ± 1.0; p < 0.001 for all). PCI increased peak-exercise average peak coronary flow velocity (p < 0.0001), coronary perfusion pressure (distal coronary pressure; p < 0.0001), systolic blood pressure (p = 0.01), accelerating wave energy (p < 0.001), and myocardial workload (rate-pressure product; p < 0.01). These changes observed immediately following PCI resulted from the abolition of stenosis resistance (p < 0.0001). PCI was also associated with an immediate improvement in exercise time (+67 s; 95% confidence interval: 31 to 102 s; p < 0.0001) and a reduction in rate-limiting angina symptoms (81% reduction in rate-limiting angina symptoms post-PCI; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with SCD and severe single-vessel stenosis, objective physiological

Journal article

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