Imperial College London

Dr Richard H. Barton

Faculty of MedicineDepartment of Metabolism, Digestion and Reproduction

Honorary Research Fellow
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 7594 3014r.barton Website

 
 
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Location

 

SAFB 660Sir Alexander Fleming BuildingSouth Kensington Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

64 results found

Hoyles L, Mayneris-Perxachs J, Cardellini M, Latorre J, Davato F, Moreno-Navarette JM, Arnoriaga-Rodriquez M, Serino M, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Fernandez-Real X, Ricart W, Tomlinson C, Woodbridge M, Gentileschi P, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Perez-Brocal V, Moya A, McClain D, Burcelin R, Dumas M-E, Federici M, Fernandez-Real J-Met al., 2021, ­Iron status influences non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obesity through the gut microbiome, Microbiome, Vol: 9, Pages: 1-18, ISSN: 2049-2618

Background: The gut microbiome and iron status are known to play a role in the pathophysiology of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), although their complex interaction remains unclear.Results: Here, we applied an integrative systems medicine approach (faecal metagenomics, plasma and urine metabolomics, hepatic transcriptomics) in 2 well-characterised human cohorts of subjects with obesity (discovery n = 49 and validation n = 628) and an independent cohort formed by both individuals with and without obesity (n = 130), combined with in vitro and animal models. Serum ferritin levels, as a markers of liver iron stores, were positively associated with liver fat accumulation in parallel with lower gut microbial gene richness, composition and functionality. Specifically, ferritin had strong negative associations with the Pasteurellaceae, Leuconostocaceae and Micrococcaea families. It also had consistent negative associations with several Veillonella, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus species, but positive associations with Bacteroides and Prevotella spp. Notably, the ferritin-associated bacterial families had a strong correlation with iron-related liver genes. In addition, several bacterial functions related to iron metabolism (transport, chelation, heme and siderophore biosynthesis) and NAFLD (fatty acid and glutathione biosynthesis) were also associated with the host serum ferritin levels. This iron-related microbiome signature was linked to a transcriptomic and metabolomic signature associated to the degree of liver fat accumulation through hepatic glucose metabolism. In particular, we found a consistent association among serum ferritin, Pasteurellaceae and Micrococcacea families, bacterial functions involved in histidine transport, the host circulating histidine levels and the liver expression of GYS2 and SEC24B. Serum ferritin was also related to bacterial glycine transporters, the host glycine serum levels and the liver expression of glycine transporters. The

Journal article

Mayneris-Perxachs J, Puig J, Burcelin R, Dumas M-E, Barton RH, Hoyles L, Federici M, Fernandez-Real J-Met al., 2020, The APOA1bp-SREBF-NOTCH axis is associated with reduced atherosclerosis risk in morbidly obese patients, CLINICAL NUTRITION, Vol: 39, Pages: 3408-3418, ISSN: 0261-5614

Journal article

Dumas M-E, Chilloux J, Myridakis A, Hoyles L, Everard A, Plovier H, Cani P, Brial F, Gauguier D, Smyth D, Zhang L, Liu Pet al., 2018, Microbiome inhibition of IRAK-4 by trimethylamine mediates metabolic and immune benefits in high fat diet-induced insulin resistance, 54th Annual Meeting of the European-Association-for-the-Study-of-Diabetes (EASD), Publisher: SPRINGER, Pages: S267-S268, ISSN: 0012-186X

Conference paper

Hoyles L, Fernandez-Real J-M, Federici M, Serino M, Abbott J, Charpentier J, Heymes C, Luque JL, Anthony E, Barton RH, Chilloux J, Myridakis A, Martinez-Gili L, Moreno-Navarrete JM, Benhamed F, Azalbert V, Blasco-Baque V, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Tomlinson C, Woodbridge M, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentileschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Postic C, Burcelin R, Dumas M-Eet al., 2018, Publisher Correction: Molecular phenomics and metagenomics of hepatic steatosis in non-diabetic obese women, Nature Medicine, Vol: 24, Pages: 1628-1628, ISSN: 1078-8956

In the version of this article originally published, the received date was missing. It should have been listed as 2 January 2018. The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of this article.

Journal article

Hoyles L, Fernández-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Abbott J, Charpentier J, Heymes C, Latorre Luque J, Anthony E, Barton RH, Chilloux J, Myridakis A, Martinez-Gili L, Moreno-Navarrete JM, Rayah F, Azalbert V, Blasco-Baque V, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Tomlinson C, Woodbridge M, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Postic C, Burcelin R, Dumas MEet al., 2018, Molecular phenomics and metagenomics of hepatic steatosis in non-diabetic obese women, Nature Medicine, Vol: 24, Pages: 1-17, ISSN: 1078-8956

Hepatic steatosis is a multifactorial condition that is often observed in obese patients and is a prelude to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Here, we combine shotgun sequencing of fecal metagenomes with molecular phenomics (hepatic transcriptome and plasma and urine metabolomes) in two well-characterized cohorts of morbidly obese women recruited to the FLORINASH study. We reveal molecular networks linking the gut microbiome and the host phenome to hepatic steatosis. Patients with steatosis have low microbial gene richness and increased genetic potential for the processing of dietary lipids and endotoxin biosynthesis (notably from Proteobacteria), hepatic inflammation and dysregulation of aromatic and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. We demonstrated that fecal microbiota transplants and chronic treatment with phenylacetic acid, a microbial product of aromatic amino acid metabolism, successfully trigger steatosis and branched-chain amino acid metabolism. Molecular phenomic signatures were predictive (area under the curve = 87%) and consistent with the gut microbiome having an effect on the steatosis phenome (>75% shared variation) and, therefore, actionable via microbiome-based therapies.

Journal article

Moreno-Navarrete JM, Serino M, Blasco-Baque V, Azalbert V, Barton RH, Cardellini M, Latorre J, Ortega F, Sabater-Masdeu M, Burcelin R, Dumas M-E, Ricart W, Federici M, Fernández-Real JMet al., 2017, Gut microbiota interacts with markers of adipose tissue Browning, insulin action and plasma acetate in morbid obesity, Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, Vol: 62, ISSN: 1613-4125

SCOPE: To examine the potential relationship among gene expression markers of adipose tissue browning, gut microbiota, and insulin sensitivity in humans. METHODS AND RESULTS: Gut microbiota composition and gene markers of browning are analyzed in subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) adipose tissue from morbidly obese subjects (n = 34). Plasma acetate is measured through 1 H NMR and insulin sensitivity using euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Subjects with insulin resistance show an increase in the relative abundance (RA) of the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria while RA of Firmicutes is decreased. In all subjects, Firmicutes RA is negatively correlated with HbA1c and fasting triglycerides, whereas Proteobacteria RA was negatively correlated with insulin sensitivity. Firmicutes RA is positively associated with markers of brown adipocytes (PRDM16, UCP1, and DIO2) in SAT, but not in VAT. Multivariate regression analysis indicates that Firmicutes RA contributes significantly to SAT PRDM16, UCP1, and DIO2 mRNA variance after controlling for age, BMI, HbA1c , or insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, Firmicutes RA, specifically those bacteria belonging to the Ruminococcaceae family, is positively associated with plasma acetate levels, which are also linked to SAT PRDM16 mRNA and insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Gut microbiota composition is linked to adipose tissue browning and insulin action in morbidly obese subjects, possibly through circulating acetate.

Journal article

Hoyles L, Fernández-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Azalbert V, Blasco V, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Woodbridge M, Tomlinson C, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Postic C, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Burcelin R, Dumas MEet al., 2017, Integrated systems biology to study the contribution of the gut microbiome to steatosis in obese women, Exploring Human Host-Microbiome Interactions in Health and Disease

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease, increasing in worldwide prevalence as a result of the obesity epidemic. It manifests in hepatic cells as steatosis with or without lobular inflammation and/or ballooning. Animal and human studies have suggested the gut microbiome contributes to steatosis/NAFLD. The aim of this study was to use an integrated approach with various -omics and clinical data to evaluate the contribution of the gut microbiome to the molecular phenome (hepatic transcriptome, metabonome) of steatosis. Metagenomic (faecal microbiome), transcriptomic (liver biopsy), metabonomic (plasma and urine, 1H-NMR) and clinical data were collected for 56 morbidly obese (BMI >35) women from Italy (n = 31) and Spain (n = 25) who elected for bariatric surgery. Confounder analyses of clinical data were done using linear modelling. Histological examination of liver biopsies was used to grade steatosis. Faecal metagenomes were generated and analysed using the SCalable Automated Metagenomics Pipeline (SCAMP). Differentially expressed genes were identified in hepatic transcriptomes, and analysed using a range of different bioinformatics tools. 1H-NMR data were generated for plasma and urinary metabonomes. Clinical, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabonomic data were integrated in the context of steatosis using partial Spearman's correlation, taking confounders (age, body mass index and cohort) into account. Steatosis was anti-correlated with microbial gene richness, and correlated with abundance of Proteobacteria. KEGG analyses of metagenomic data suggested increased microbial processing of dietary lipids and amino acids, as well as endotoxin-related processes related to Proteobacteria. Steatosis-associated hepatic transcriptomes were associated with branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum/phagosome, and immune responses associated with non-specific microbial infections. Metabonom

Poster

Dumas M, Rothwell AR, Hoyles L, Aranias T, Chilloux J, Calderari S, Noll EM, Péan N, Boulange CL, Blancher C, Barton RH, Gu Q, Fearnside JF, Deshayes C, Hue C, Scott J, Nicholson JK, Gauguier Det al., 2017, Microbial-host co-metabolites are prodromal markers predicting phenotypic heterogeneity in behavior, obesity and impaired glucose tolerance, Cell Reports, Vol: 20, Pages: 136-148, ISSN: 2211-1247

The influence of the gut microbiome on metabolic and behavioral traits is now widely accepted, though the microbiome-derived metabolites involved remain unclear. We carried out untargeted urine 1H NMR spectroscopy-based metabolic phenotyping in an isogenic C57BL/6J mouse population (n=50) and show that microbial-host co-metabolites are prodromal (i.e., early) markers predicting future divergence in metabolic (obesity and glucose homeostasis) and behaviorial (anxiety and activity) outcomes with 94-100% accuracy. Some of these metabolites also modulate disease phenotypes, best illustrated by trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO), a product of microbial-host co-metabolism predicting future obesity, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and behavior, whilst reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress and lipogenesis in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Chronic in vivo TMAO treatment limits IGT in HFD-fed mice and isolated pancreatic islets by increasing insulin secretion. We highlight the prodromal potential of microbial metabolites to predict disease outcomes and their potential in shaping mammalian phenotypic heterogeneity.

Journal article

Hoyles L, Fernández-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Azalbert V, Blasco V, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Woodbridge M, Tomlinson C, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieshci P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Postic C, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Burcelin R, Dumas MDet al., 2017, Integrated systems biology to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese women, International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics

Metagenomic (faecal microbiome), transcriptomic (liver biopsy), metabonomic (plasma and urine, 1H-NMR) and clinical (28 variables) data were collected for 56 morbidly obese (BMI >35) women from Italy (n = 31) and Spain (n = 25) who elected for bariatric surgery. Data were integrated to evaluate the contribution of the gut microbiome to the molecular phenome (hepatic transcriptome, plasma and urine metabonome) of NAFLD independent of clinical confounders (age, BMI, cohort) using partial Spearman’s correlation. NAFLD activity score (NAS) was anti-correlated with microbial gene richness, and correlated with abundance of Proteobacteria. KEGG analyses of metagenomic data suggested increased microbial processing of dietary lipids and amino acids, as well as endotoxin-related processes related to Proteobacteria. Metabonomic profiles highlighted imbalances in choline metabolism, branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolism and gut-derived microbial metabolites resulting from metabolism of amino acids. NAFLD-associated hepatic transcriptomes were associated with BCAA metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum/phagosome, and immune responses associated with non-specific microbial infections. Molecular phenomic signatures were stable and predictive regardless of sample size, and consistent with the microbiome making a significant contribution to the NAFLD phenome. There is disruption of the gut– liver axis in NAFLD, which can be seen in the gut microbiome, hepatic transcriptome and urinary and plasma metabonomes. Consistency of phenome signatures strongly supports a relationship between microbial amino acid metabolism and microbial gene richness, hepatic gene expression and biofluid metabonomes, and ultimately NAS.

Poster

Hoyles L, Fernandez-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Azalbert V, Blasco V, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Woodbridge M, Tomlinson C, Cardelini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Postic C, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Burcenlin R, Dumas MEet al., 2017, Integrated systems biology to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese women, Tranlsational Bioinformatics

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a multifactorial condition and one of the most common causes of chronic liver disease, with increasing worldwide prevalence. Microbiome-associated lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are associated with NAFLD in rodent models, but their relevance in human liver disease is not understood. In addition, microbiome-driven degradation of dietary choline – and its subsequent removal from host-associated metabolic processes – is thought to contribute to development of NAFLD. The FLORINASH study set out to determine the contribution of the gut microbiome to the NAFLD-associated molecular phenome (transcriptome, metabonome) independent of clinical confounders.Morbidly obese women [body mass index (BMI) >35] from Italy (n = 31) and Spain (n = 25) who elected for bariatric surgery were recruited to the study. Clinical data (28 variables) were recorded. Faecal samples, liver biopsies, blood and urine samples were collected. Faecal metagenomes were analysed using an in-house metagenomics pipeline (SCaleble Automated Metagenomics Pipeline). NAFLD activity score (NAS; 0, 1, 2, 3) was determined by histological examination of liver biopsies. Differentially expressed genes in hepatic transcriptomes were identified, and analysed using several complementary tools. 1H-NMR data were generated for plasma and urinary metabonomes. Clinical, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabonomic data were integrated using partial Spearman’s correlation, taking identified confounders (age, BMI and cohort) into account.NAS was anti-correlated with microbial gene richness, and correlated with abundance of Gram-negative Proteobacteria. KEGG analyses of metagenomic data suggested increased microbial processing of dietary lipids and amino acids, as well as LPS-related processes associated with Proteobacteria in NAFLD. Activation of immune responses associated with Gram-negative (LPS-associated) microbial infections was correlated with NAS in hepatic tr

Poster

Hoyles L, Fernández-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Azalbert V, Blasco V, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Woodbridge M, Tomlinson C, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Postic C, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Burcelin R, Dumas MEet al., 2017, Integrated systems biology to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese women, Gut Microbiota for Health World Summit 2017

Objectives: To integrate metagenomic (faecal microbiome), transcriptomic, metabonomic and clinical data to evaluate the contribution of the gut microbiome to the molecular phenome (hepatic transcriptome, plasma and urine metabonome) of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) independent of clinical confounders in morbidly obese women recruited to the FLORINASH study.Methods: Faecal, liver biopsy, blood and urine samples and data for 28 clinical variables were collected for 56 obese [body mass index (BMI) >35] women from Italy (n = 31) and Spain (n = 25) who elected for bariatric surgery. Confounder analyses of clinical data were done using linear modeling. Histological examination of liver biopsies was used to grade NAFLD (NAFLD activity score: 0, 1, 2, 3). Faecal metagenomes were generated and analysed using the Imperial Metagenomics Pipeline. Differentially expressed genes were identified in hepatic transcriptomes, and analysed using Enrichr, network analyses and Signaling Pathway Impact Analysis. 1H-NMR data were generated for plasma and urinary metabonomes. Clinical, metagenomic, transcriptomic and metabonomic data were integrated using partial Spearman’s correlation, taking confounders (age, body mass index and cohort) into account.Results: NAFLD activity score was anti-correlated with microbial gene richness, and correlated with abundance of Proteobacteria. KEGG analyses of metagenomic data suggested increased microbial processing of dietary lipids and amino acids, as well as endotoxin-related processes related to Proteobacteria. Metabonomic profiles highlighted imbalances in choline metabolism, branched-chain amino acid metabolism and gut-derived microbial metabolites resulting from metabolism of amino acids. NAFLD-associated hepatic transcriptomes were associated with branched-chain amino acid metabolism, endoplasmic reticulum/phagosome, and immune responses associated with microbial infections. Molecular phenomic signatures were stable and predic

Poster

Hoyles L, Fernández-Real JM, Federici M, Serino M, Azalbert V, Blasco V, Abbott J, Barton RH, Puig J, Xifra G, Ricart W, Woodbridge M, Tomlinson C, Cardellini M, Davato F, Cardolini I, Porzio O, Gentilieschi P, Lopez F, Foufelle F, Postic C, Butcher SA, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Burcelin R, Dumas MEet al., 2017, Integrated systems biology to study non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in obese women, MRC-PHE Centre for Environment & Health - Centre Training Programme Annual Meeting

Poster

Villasenor A, Kinross JM, Li JV, Penney N, Barton RH, Nicholson JK, Darzi A, Barbas C, Holmes Eet al., 2014, H-1 NMR Global Metabolic Phenotyping of Acute Pancreatitis in the Emergency Unit, JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, Vol: 13, Pages: 5362-5375, ISSN: 1535-3893

Journal article

Chilloux J, Fearnside J, Rothwell A, Barton R, Boulange C, Scott J, Nicholson JK, Gauguier D, Gooderham N, Dumas MEet al., 2014, Gut Microbial Metabolite Trimethylamine Inhibits the Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Inflammation Pathway, Diabetes, Vol: 63

Journal article

Chilloux J, Fearnside JF, Rothwell AR, Barton RH, Boulange CL, Scott J, Nicholson JK, Gauguier D, Gooderham N, Dumas MEet al., 2014, Gut Microbial Metabolite Trimethylamine Inhibits the Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) Inflammation Pathway, Publisher: AMER DIABETES ASSOC, Pages: A451-A451, ISSN: 0012-1797

Conference paper

Wijeyesekera A, Selman C, Barton RH, Holmes E, Nicholson JK, Withers DJet al., 2012, Metabotyping of Long-Lived Mice using H-1 NMR Spectroscopy, Journal of Proteome Research, Vol: 11, Pages: 2224-2235, ISSN: 1535-3893

Significant advances in understanding aging have been achieved through studying model organisms with extended healthy lifespans. Employing 1H NMR spectroscopy, we characterized the plasma metabolic phenotype (metabotype) of three long-lived murine models: 30% dietary restricted (DR), insulin receptor substrate 1 null (Irs1–/–), and Ames dwarf (Prop1df/df). A panel of metabolic differences were generated for each model relative to their controls, and subsequently, the three long-lived models were compared to one another. Concentrations of mobile very low density lipoproteins, trimethylamine, and choline were significantly decreased in the plasma of all three models. Metabolites including glucose, choline, glycerophosphocholine, and various lipids were significantly reduced, while acetoacetate, d-3-hydroxybutyrate and trimethylamine-N-oxide levels were increased in DR compared to ad libitum fed controls. Plasma lipids and glycerophosphocholine were also decreased in Irs1–/– mice compared to controls, as were methionine and citrate. In contrast, high density lipoproteins and glycerophosphocholine were increased in Ames dwarf mice, as were methionine and citrate. Pairwise comparisons indicated that differences existed between the metabotypes of the different long-lived mice models. Irs1–/– mice, for example, had elevated glucose, acetate, acetone, and creatine but lower methionine relative to DR mice and Ames dwarfs. Our study identified several potential candidate biomarkers directionally altered across all three models that may be predictive of longevity but also identified differences in the metabolic signatures. This comparative approach suggests that the metabolic networks underlying lifespan extension may not be exactly the same for each model of longevity and is consistent with multifactorial control of the aging process.

Journal article

Veselkov KA, Vingara LK, Masson P, Robinette SL, Want E, Li JV, Barton RH, Boursier-Neyret C, Walther B, Ebbels TM, Pelczer I, Holmes E, Lindon JC, Nicholson JKet al., 2011, Response to Comment on "Optimized Preprocessing of Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Urinary Metabolic Profiles for Improved Information Recovery", ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 83, Pages: 9721-9722, ISSN: 0003-2700

Journal article

Veselkov KA, Vingara LK, Masson P, Robinette SL, Want E, Li JV, Barton RH, Boursier-Neyret C, Walther B, Ebbels TM, Pelczer I, Holmes E, Lindon JC, Nicholson JKet al., 2011, Optimized Preprocessing of Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Urinary Metabolic Profiles for Improved Information Recovery, ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY, Vol: 83, Pages: 5864-5872, ISSN: 0003-2700

Journal article

Dawson LF, Donahue EH, Cartman ST, Barton RH, Bundy J, McNerney R, Minton NP, Wren BWet al., 2011, The analysis of para-cresol production and tolerance in Clostridium difficile 027 and 012 strains, BMC MICROBIOLOGY, Vol: 11, ISSN: 1471-2180

Journal article

Barton RH, 2011, A decade of advances in metabonomics, EXPERT OPINION ON DRUG METABOLISM & TOXICOLOGY, Vol: 7, Pages: 129-136, ISSN: 1742-5255

Journal article

Kinross J, Alkhamesi N, Barton R, Silk DB, Yap IK, Darzi A, Holmes E, Nicholson JKet al., 2011, Global metabolic phenotyping in an experimental laparotomy model of surgical trauma., Journal of Proteome Research, Vol: 1, Pages: 277-287

Surgical trauma initiates a complex series of metabolic host responses designed to maintain homeostasis and ensure survival. (1)H NMR spectroscopy was applied to intraoperative urine and plasma samples as part of a strategy to analyze the metabolic response of Wistar rats to a laparotomy model. Spectral data were analyzed by multivariate statistical analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed that surgical injury is responsible for the majority of the metabolic variability demonstrated between animals (R² Urine = 81.2% R² plasma = 80%). Further statistical analysis by orthogonal projection to latent structure discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) allowed the identification of novel urinary metabolic markers of surgical trauma. Urinary levels of taurine, glucose, urea, creatine, allantoin, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) were significantly increased after surgery whereas citrate and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG) negatively correlated with the intraoperative state as did plasma levels of betaine and tyrosine. Plasma levels of lipoproteins such as VLDL and LDL also rose with the duration of surgery. Moreover, the microbial cometabolites 3-hydroxyphenylpropionate, phenylacetylglycine, and hippurate correlated with the surgical insult, indicating that the gut microbiota are highly sensitive to the global homeostatic state of the host. Metabonomic profiling provides a global overview of surgical trauma that has the potential to provide novel biomarkers for personalized surgical optimization and outcome prediction.

Journal article

Fonville JM, Richards SE, Barton RH, Boulange CL, Ebbels TMD, Nicholson JK, Holmes EC, Dumas MEet al., 2010, The Evolution of Partial Least Squares Models and Related Chemometric Approaches in Metabonomics and Metabolic Phenotyping, J. Chemometrics, Vol: 24, Pages: 636-649

Metabonomics is a key element in systems biology, and with current analytical methods, generates vast amounts ofquantitative or qualitative metabolic data. Understanding of the global function of the living organism can beachieved by integration of ‘omics’ approaches including metabonomics, genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics,increasing the complexity of the full data sets. Multivariate statistical approaches are well suited to extract thecharacterizing metabolic information associated with each level of dynamic process. In this review, we discusstechniques that have evolved from principal component analysis and partial least squares (PLS) methods with a focuson improved interpretation and modeling with respect to biomarker recovery and data visualization in the context ofmetabonomic applications. Visualization is of paramount importance to investigate complex metabolic signatures,the power and potential of which is illustrated with key papers. Recent improvements based on the removal oforthogonal variation are discussed in terms of interpretation enhancement, and are supported by relevantapplications. Flexibility of PLS methods in general and of O-PLS in particular allows implementation of derivativemethods such as O2-PLS, O-PLS-variance components, nonlinear methods, and batch modeling to improve analysis ofcomplex data sets, which facilitates extraction of information related to subtle biological processes. These approachescan be used to address issues present in complex multi-factorial data sets. Thus, we highlight the key advantages andlimitations of the different latent variable applications for top-down systems biology and assess the differencesbetween the methods available.

Journal article

Veselkov KA, Pahomov VI, Lindon JC, Volynkin VS, Crockford D, Osipenko GS, Davies DB, Barton RH, Bang J-W, Holmes E, Nicholson JKet al., 2010, A Metabolic Entropy Approach for Measurements of Systemic Metabolic Disruptions in Patho-Physiological States, JOURNAL OF PROTEOME RESEARCH, Vol: 9, Pages: 3537-3544, ISSN: 1535-3893

Journal article

Barton RH, Waterman D, Bonner FW, Holmes E, Clarke R, the PROCARDIS Consortium, Nicholson JK, Lindon JCet al., 2009, The influence of EDTA and citrate anticoagulant addition to human plasma on information recovery from NMR-based metabolic profiling studies, Molecular BioSystems

Journal article

Barton RH, 2009, Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases, AMERICAN JOURNAL OF HUMAN BIOLOGY, Vol: 21, Pages: 226-227, ISSN: 1042-0533

Journal article

Barton RH, 2009, "Molecular Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases " - Book Review, Am. J. Hum. Bio., Vol: 22, Pages: 226-227

Journal article

Kinross J, Barton R H, Hunte K D, Tuohy K M, Alkhamesi N, Goldin R, Silk D, Holmes E, Nicholson J, Darzi Aet al., 2008, Surgical Supersystems: Metabonomic Profiling of the Gut Microbiome During Surgically-Induced Ischaemia / Reperfusion Injury, 9th International Conference on Systems Biology

Conference paper

Tamaddoni-Nezhad A, Barton RH, Hitchen P, Kay E, Lesk V, Turner F, Dell A, Rawlings C, Sternberg M, Wren B, Muggleton Set al., 2008, A Logic-Based Approach for Modeling Genotype-Phenotype Relations in Campylobacter, 9th International Conference on Systems Biology

Conference paper

Barton RH, Nicholson JK, Elliott P, Holmes Eet al., 2008, High-throughput H-1 NMR-based metabolic analysis of human serum and urine for large-scale epidemiological studies: validation study, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF EPIDEMIOLOGY, Vol: 37, Pages: 31-40, ISSN: 0300-5771

Journal article

Fearnside JF, Dumas M-E, Rothwell AR, Wilder SP, Cloarec O, Toye A, Blancher C, Holmes E, Tatoud R, Barton RH, Scott J, Nicholson JK, Gauguier Det al., 2008, Phylometabonomic Patterns of Adaptation to High Fat Diet Feeding in Inbred Mice, PLOS ONE, Vol: 3, ISSN: 1932-6203

Journal article

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