Imperial College London

Dr Robert Boyle

Faculty of MedicineNational Heart & Lung Institute

Reader in Paediatric Allergy
 
 
 
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Contact

 

+44 (0)20 3312 7892r.boyle Website

 
 
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Location

 

Paediatric Research UnitQueen Elizabeth the Queen Mother Wing (QEQM)St Mary's Campus

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Summary

 

Publications

Publication Type
Year
to

375 results found

Demidova A, Drewitz KP, Kimkool P, Banjanin N, Barzylovich V, Botjes E, Capper I, Castor MAR, Comberiati P, Cook EE, Costa J, Chu DK, Epstein MM, Galvin AD, Giovannini M, Girard F, Golding MA, Greenhawt M, Ierodiakonou D, Jones CJ, Khaleva E, Knibb RC, Macit-Çelebi MS, Mack DP, Mafra I, Marchisotto MJ, Mijakoski D, Nekliudov N, Özdemir C, Patel N, Pazukhina E, Protudjer JLP, Rodríguez Del Rio P, Roomet J, Sammut P, Schoos A-MM, Schopfer AF, Schultz F, Seylanova N, Skypala I, Sørensen M, Stoleski S, Stylianou E, Upton J, van de Veen W, Genuneit J, Boyle RJ, Apfelbacher C, Munblit D, COMFA Consortiumet al., 2024, Core Outcome Set for IgE-mediated food allergy clinical trials and observational studies of interventions: International Delphi consensus study 'COMFA'., Allergy, Vol: 79, Pages: 977-989

BACKGROUND: IgE-mediated food allergy (FA) is a global health concern with substantial individual and societal implications. While diverse intervention strategies have been researched, inconsistencies in reported outcomes limit evaluations of FA treatments. To streamline evaluations and promote consistent reporting, the Core Outcome Measures for Food Allergy (COMFA) initiative aimed to establish a Core Outcome Set (COS) for FA clinical trials and observational studies of interventions. METHODS: The project involved a review of published clinical trials, trial protocols and qualitative literature. Outcomes found as a result of review were categorized and classified, informing a two-round online-modified Delphi process followed by hybrid consensus meeting to finalize the COS. RESULTS: The literature review, taxonomy mapping and iterative discussions with diverse COMFA group yielded an initial list of 39 outcomes. The iterative online and in-person meetings reduced the list to 13 outcomes for voting in the formal Delphi process. One more outcome was added based on participant suggestions after the first Delphi round. A total of 778 participants from 52 countries participated, with 442 participating in both Delphi rounds. No outcome met a priori criteria for inclusion, and one was excluded as a result of the Delphi. Thirteen outcomes were brought to the hybrid consensus meeting as a result of Delphi and two outcomes, 'allergic symptoms' and 'quality of life' achieved consensus for inclusion as 'core' outcomes. CONCLUSION: In addition to the mandatory reporting of adverse events for FA clinical trials or observational studies of interventions, allergic symptoms and quality of life should be measured as core outcomes. Future work by COMFA will define how best to measure these core outcomes.

Journal article

Perkin MR, Ussher M, Goldsmith LP, Flohr C, Roberts A, Cornelius V, Wahlich C, Willis K, Boyle RJet al., 2024, BabyBathe study protocol: A randomised controlled feasibility trial to change baby bathing practice during the first months of life., Clin Exp Allergy

Journal article

Goldsmith LP, Roberts A, Flohr C, Boyle RJ, Ussher M, Perkin MRet al., 2024, Routine infant skincare advice in the UK: A cross-sectional survey., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 54, Pages: 56-60

Journal article

Sheth S, Boyle R, 2024, Hydrolysis of infant formula for food allergy prevention, Reference Module in Food Science, Publisher: Elsevier, ISBN: 9780081005965

Book chapter

Goldsmith LP, Perkin MR, Wahlich C, Chandrasekaran L, Cornelius V, Boyle RJ, Flohr C, Roberts A, Willis K, Ussher Met al., 2024, Development of an intervention for reducing infant bathing frequency., PLoS One, Vol: 19

BACKGROUND: Bathing babies less frequently and intensively in the first six months of life may prevent eczema, but this has not yet been definitively tested in a randomised controlled trial. Such a trial would require evidence-based support to help parents engage with a minimal bathing routine. The present study reports the development of this support. METHODS: We adopted a four-stage design process: (i) Pregnant women and their families (n = 31) were interviewed to ascertain key barriers and facilitators towards following the minimal bathing intervention. (ii) These barriers and facilitators were mapped to behaviour change techniques, focussing on the intervention types of education, persuasion and environmental restructuring, alongside appropriate modes of delivery, and prototype intervention materials were developed. (iii) We iteratively refined these materials in a workshop with multidisciplinary experts and Patient and Public Involvement and Engagement (PPIE) representatives (n = 13) and an (iv) intervention walkthrough with families (n = 5). The design process was informed by the Behaviour Change Wheel, Theoretical framework of acceptability and the Template for intervention description and replication. RESULTS: Social influences and motivational factors are likely to influence both uptake and adherence to the intervention. Anticipated emotional reward from participating in research for the benefit of others was indicated to be a strong facilitator for intervention uptake. Alternatives to bathing, having fun with the baby and the night-time routine, alongside family support, were notable facilitators suggested to aid adherence to the intervention. Barriers included hygiene concerns and anticipated negative social appraisal. Barriers and facilitators were mapped to thirty-six behaviour change techniques, focussing on the intervention types of education, persuasion and environmental restructuring, all of which were embedded into the package of support. The proto

Journal article

Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, Roberts G, 2023, Prize-winning abstracts from the BSACI 2023 meeting., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 53, Pages: 1234-1235

Journal article

Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, 2023, Management of childhood asthma and tools to evaluate asthma pathophysiology., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 53, Pages: 1138-1140

Journal article

Bugaeva P, Arkusha I, Bikaev R, Kamenskiy I, Pokrovskaya A, El-Taravi Y, Caso V, Avedisova A, Chu DK, Genuneit J, Torbahn G, Nicholson T, Baimukhambetova D, Mursalova A, Kolotilina A, Gadetskaya S, Kondrikova E, Zinchuk M, Akzhigitov R, Boyle R, Guekht A, Munblit Det al., 2023, Association of breastfeeding with mental disorders in mother and child: a systematic review and meta-analysis, BMC Medicine, Vol: 21, ISSN: 1741-7015

Background: Breastfeeding has long been associated with numerous benefits for both mothers and infants. While some observational studies have explored the relationship between breastfeeding and mental health outcomes in mothers and children, a systematic review of the available evidence is lacking. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the association between breastfeeding and mental health disorders in mothers and children.Methods: We systematically searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from inception to June 2, 2023. The inclusion criteria consisted of all studies evaluating links between breastfeeding and development of mental health disorders in children and mothers. Risk of bias was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) while grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) was used to assess the certainty of evidence. A random-effects meta-analysis was used if possible, to estimate the odds ratio for the association between breastfeeding and mental health outcomes. The Mantel-Haenszel method was utilised for pooling ORs across studies. Study heterogeneity was assessed using the I² statistic.Results: Our review identified twenty-one original study. Of these, 18 focused on the association between breastfeeding and child health, assessing depressive disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, eating disorders and borderline personality disorder. Three studies evaluated the associations between breastfeeding and maternal mental health disorders. Three studies looking at outcomes in children showed no significant association between breastfeeding and occurrence of schizophrenia later in life (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.57–1.71; I2 = 29%). For depressive disorders (5 studies) and anxiety disorders (3 studies), we found conflicting evidence with some studies showing a small protective effect while others found no effect. The GRADE certainty for all these findings was very low due to multiple limitations. Three studies loo

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Shamji MH, Skypala IJ, Garcia-Larssen Vet al., 2023, Nutrition and Allergy., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 53, Pages: 982-983

Journal article

Vazquez-Ortiz M, Argiz L, Infante S, Barni S, BIO-FPIES Net al., 2023, Recurrences in food protein-induced enterocolitis syndrome: Let's get the label right, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 11, Pages: 3282-3282, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Shamji MH, 2023, Adrenaline auto-injectors for people at risk of anaphylaxis, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 896-898, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Sach TT, Lartey S, Davies CR, Chalmers JH, Haines RE, Bradshaw LA, Montgomery AS, Thomas KJ, Brown SJ, Ridd M, Lawton SJ, Cork M, Flohr C, Mitchell E, Swinden R, Wyatt L, Tarr S, Davies-Jones S, Jay NM, Kelleher MR, Perkin MJ, Boyle RC, Williams H, BEEP STet al., 2023, Emollients for preventing atopic eczema: Cost-effectiveness analysis of the BEEP trial, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Singh S, Kirtschig G, Anchan VN, Chi C-C, Taghipour K, Boyle RJ, Murrell DFet al., 2023, Interventions for bullous pemphigoid., Cochrane Database Syst Rev, Vol: 8

BACKGROUND: Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is the most common autoimmune blistering disease. Oral steroids are the standard treatment. We have updated this review, which was first published in 2002, because several new treatments have since been tried. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of treatments for bullous pemphigoid. SEARCH METHODS: We updated searches of the following databases to November 2021: Cochrane Skin Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and Embase. We searched five trial databases to January 2022, and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs). SELECTION CRITERIA: RCTs of treatments for immunofluorescence-confirmed bullous pemphigoid. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: At least two review authors, working independently, evaluated the studies against the review's inclusion criteria and extracted data from included studies. Using GRADE methodology, we assessed the certainty of the evidence for each outcome in each comparison. Our primary outcomes were healing of skin lesions and mortality. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 14 RCTs (1442 participants). The main treatment modalities assessed were oral steroids, topical steroids, and the oral anti-inflammatory antibiotic doxycycline. Most studies reported mortality but adverse events and quality of life were not well reported. We decided to look at the primary outcomes 'disease control' and 'mortality'. Almost all studies investigated different comparisons; two studies were placebo-controlled. The results are therefore based on a single study for each comparison except azathioprine. Most studies involved only small numbers of participants. We assessed the risk of bias for all key outcomes as having 'some concerns' or high risk, due to missing data, inappropriate analysis, or insufficient information. Clobetasol propionate cream versus oral prednisone Compared to oral prednisone, clobetasol propionate cream applied over the whole body probably in

Journal article

Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, 2023, Immunotherapy and prevention of allergic diseases., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 53, Pages: 788-790

Journal article

Scarpone R, Kimkool P, Boyle RJ, 2023, Data Extraction and Handling Issues on Evidence Synthesis of Risk of Immunoglobulin E-Mediated Food Allergy-Reply, JAMA PEDIATRICS, ISSN: 2168-6203

Journal article

Allen H, Gupta A, Mundell A, Gupta N, Thakur A, Nagarajan S, Munblit D, Baker P, Boyle Ret al., 2023, Formula milk companies and allergy healthcare professionals in India, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 697-710, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Allen H, Gupta A, Mundell A, Gupta N, Thakur A, Nagarajan S, Munblit D, Baker P, Boyle Ret al., 2023, Featured Cover, Clinical & Experimental Allergy, Vol: 53, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Krishna MT, Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, 2023, Allergy in India, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 690-692, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Banerjee J, McLister A, Gourin B, McClure Z, Mariampillai K, Boyle RJ, Hanna GB, Ni MZet al., 2023, Tributyrin ester-impregnated pH strips for confirming neonatal feeding tube placement: a diagnostic test accuracy study, Archives of Disease in Childhood: Fetal and Neonatal Edition, Vol: 108, Pages: 433-434, ISSN: 1359-2998

Journal article

Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, 2023, Novel diagnostics and therapeutic approaches for allergic diseases, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 602-604, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Tomlinson E, Pardo JP, Sivesind T, Szeto MD, Laughter M, Foxlee R, Brown M, Skoetz N, Dellavalle RP, Franco JVA, Clarke M, Krentel A, Reveiz L, Saran A, Tse F, Wells GA, Boyle R, Hilgart J, Ndi EE-A, Welch V, Petkovic J, Tugwell Pet al., 2023, Prioritising Cochrane reviews to be updated with health equity focus, INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR EQUITY IN HEALTH, Vol: 22

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Shamji MH, 2023, Food anaphylaxis in older people, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 488-490, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Bradshaw LE, Wyatt LA, Brown SJ, Haines RH, Montgomery AA, Perkin MR, Lawton S, Sach TH, Chalmers JR, Ridd MJ, Flohr C, Brooks J, Swinden R, Mitchell EJ, Tarr S, Jay N, Thomas KS, Allen H, Cork MJ, Kelleher MM, Simpson EL, Lartey ST, Davies-Jones S, Boyle RJ, Williams HCet al., 2023, Emollients for prevention of atopic dermatitis: 5-year findings from the BEEP randomized trial, ALLERGY, Vol: 78, Pages: 995-1006, ISSN: 0105-4538

Journal article

Lloyd M, Loke P, Mack DP, Sicherer SH, Perkin MR, Boyle R, Leung ASY, Lee BW, Levin M, Blumchen K, Fiocchi A, Ebisawa M, Oliveira LCLD, Tang MLKet al., 2023, Varying Approaches to Management of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy in Children Around the World, JOURNAL OF ALLERGY AND CLINICAL IMMUNOLOGY-IN PRACTICE, Vol: 11, Pages: 1010-+, ISSN: 2213-2198

Journal article

Scarpone R, Kimkool P, Ierodiakonou D, Leonardi-Bee J, Garcia-Larsen V, Perkin MR, Boyle RJet al., 2023, Timing of allergenic food introduction and risk of IgE-mediated food allergy: systematic review and meta-analysis, JAMA Pediatrics, Vol: 177, Pages: 489-497, ISSN: 1072-4710

Importance Earlier egg and peanut introduction probably reduces risk of egg and peanut allergy, respectively, but it is uncertain whether food allergy as a whole can be prevented using earlier allergenic food introduction.Objective To investigate associations between timing of allergenic food introduction to the infant diet and risk of food allergy.Data Sources In this systematic review and meta-analysis, Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL databases were searched for articles from database inception to December 29, 2022. Search terms included infant, randomized controlled trial, and terms for common allergenic foods and allergic outcomes.Study Selection Randomized clinical trials evaluating age at allergenic food introduction (milk, egg, fish, shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, and soya) during infancy and immunoglobulin E (IgE)–mediated food allergy from 1 to 5 years of age were included. Screening was conducted independently by multiple authors.Data Extraction and Synthesis The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analyses guideline was used. Data were extracted in duplicate and synthesized using a random-effects model. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation framework was used to assess certainty of evidence.Main Outcomes and Measures Primary outcomes were risk of IgE-mediated allergy to any food from 1 to 5 years of age and withdrawal from the intervention. Secondary outcomes included allergy to specific foods.Results Of 9283 titles screened, data were extracted from 23 eligible trials (56 articles, 13 794 randomized participants). There was moderate-certainty evidence from 4 trials (3295 participants) that introduction of multiple allergenic foods from 2 to 12 months of age (median age, 3-4 months) was associated with reduced risk of food allergy (risk ratio [RR], 0.49; 95% CI, 0.33-0.74; I2 = 49%). Absolute risk difference for a population with 5% incidence of food allergy was −

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Flohr C, Shamji MH, 2023, Global trends in eczema prevalence during early life, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 252-254, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

Arasi S, Nurmatov U, Dunn-Galvin A, Roberts G, Turner PJ, Shinder SB, Gupta R, Eigenmann P, Nowak-Wegrzyn A, Ansotegui IJ, Rivas MF, Petrou S, Tanno LK, Vazquez-Ortiz M, Vickery B, Wong G, Alvaro-Lozano M, Asaria M, Begin P, Bozzola M, Boyle R, Brough H, Cardona V, Chinthrajah RS, Cianferoni A, Deschildre A, Fleischer D, Gazzani F, Gerdts J, Giannetti M, Greenhawt M, Guzmán MA, Hossny E, Kauppi P, Jones C, Lucidi F, Monge Ortega OP, Munblit D, Muraro A, Pajno G, Podestà M, Rodriguez Del Rio P, Said M, Santos A, Shaker M, Szajewska H, Venter C, Warren C, Winders T, Ebisawa M, Fiocchi Aet al., 2023, WAO consensus on DEfinition of Food Allergy SEverity (DEFASE)., The World Allergy Organization Journal, Vol: 16, Pages: 1-23, ISSN: 1939-4551

BACKGROUND: While several scoring systems for the severity of anaphylactic reactions have been developed, there is a lack of consensus on definition and categorisation of severity of food allergy disease as a whole. AIM: To develop an international consensus on the severity of food allergy (DEfinition of Food Allergy Severity, DEFASE) scoring system, to be used globally. METHODS PHASE 1: We conducted a mixed-method systematic review (SR) of 11 databases for published and unpublished literature on severity of food allergy management and set up a panel of international experts. PHASE 2: Based on our findings in Phase 1, we drafted statements for a two-round modified electronic Delphi (e-Delphi) survey. A purposefully selected multidisciplinary international expert panel on food allergy (n = 60) was identified and sent a structured questionnaire, including a set of statements on different domains of food allergy severity related to symptoms, health-related quality of life, and economic impact. Participants were asked to score their agreement on each statement on a 5-point Likert scale ranging from "strongly agree" to "strongly disagree". Median scores and percentage agreements were calculated. Consensus was defined a priori as being achieved if 70% or more of panel members rated a statement as "strongly agree" to "agree" after the second round. Based on feedback, 2 additional online voting rounds were conducted. RESULTS: We received responses from 92% of Delphi panel members in round 1 and 85% in round 2. Consensus was achieved on the overall score and in all of the 5 specific key domains as essential components of the DEFASE score. CONCLUSIONS: The DEFASE score is the first comprehensive grading of food allergy severity that considers not only the severity of a single reaction, but the whole disease spectrum. An international consensus has been achieved regarding a scoring system for food allergy disease. It offers an

Journal article

Munblit D, Petrou L, Boyle R, 2023, Health and nutrition claims for infant formula: international cross sectional survey, BMJ: British Medical Journal, Vol: 380, Pages: 1-10, ISSN: 0959-535X

Objectives To review available health and nutrition claims for infant formula products in multiple countries and to evaluate the validity of the evidence used for substantiation of claims.Design International cross sectional survey.Setting Public facing and healthcare professional facing company owned or company managed formula industry websites providing information about products marketed for healthy infants delivered at full term in 15 countries: Australia, Canada, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Nigeria, Norway, Pakistan, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Spain, the United Kingdom, and the United States in 2020-22.Main outcome measures Number and type of claims made for each product and ingredient. References cited were reviewed and risk of bias was assessed for registered clinical trials using the Cochrane risk of bias tool, and for systematic reviews using the Risk Of Bias in Systematic reviews tool.Results 757 infant formula products were identified, each with a median of two claims (range from 1 (Australia) to 4 (US)), and 31 types of claims across all products. Of 608 products with ≥1 claims, the most common claim types were “helps/supports development of brain and/or eyes and/or nervous system” (323 (53%) products, 13 ingredients), “strengthens/supports a healthy immune system” (239 (39%) products, 12 ingredients), and “helps/supports growth and development” (224 (37%) products, 20 ingredients). 41 groups of ingredients were associated with ≥1claims, but many claims were made without reference to a specific ingredient (307 (50%) products). The most common groups of ingredients cited in claims were long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (278 (46%) products, 9 different claims); prebiotics, probiotics, or synbiotics (225 (37%) products, 19 claims); and hydrolysed protein (120 (20%) products, 9 claims). 161/608 (26%) products with ≥1 claims provided a scientific reference to support the claim—266 unique refer

Journal article

Shamji MH, Boyle RJ, 2023, Biological therapy practice, biomarkers of severe asthma and novel approaches for attaining immunomodulation in upper airway disease., Clin Exp Allergy, Vol: 53, Pages: 130-131

The hybrid rDer p 2231 stimulated in PBMCs isolated from atopic patients, higher levels of IL-2, IL-10, IL-15 and IFN-γ, as well as lower levels of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, TNF-α and GM-CSF. The use of hybrid molecules as a therapeutic model in D. pteronyssinus allergic mice led to the reduction of IgE production and lower eosinophilic peroxidase activity in the airways. We found increased levels of IgG antibodies, which blocked the IgE binding to the parental allergens in serum of atopic patients. Furthermore, the stimulation of splenocytes from mice treated with rDer p 2231 induced higher levels of IL-10 and IFN-γ and decreased the secretion of IL-4 and IL-5, when compared to parental allergens and D. pteronyssinus extract. (7).

Journal article

Boyle RJ, Shamji MH, 2023, What does <i>Clinical and Experimental Allergy</i> mean by Trusted Evidence in Allergy'?, CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL ALLERGY, Vol: 53, Pages: 4-6, ISSN: 0954-7894

Journal article

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